1878 – 1915

Eleazer Mighell 1878.06.01
Eleazer Mighell, died at his residence in Clinton Township June 29, 1878, aged 85 years, 4 months, and 3 days.
Deacon Mighell was born at Wallingford, VT, February 26, 1793, and removed to DeKalb County, IL, in January 1854, being one of the early settlers of Clinton Township. He was a man of sterling integrity, and was esteemed and respected by all who knew him. He was for more than 50 years, a faithful and consistent member of the Baptist Church. In 1856 he, with a few others, organized the Baptist Church of Clinton Center, which he served faithfully as deacon for 22 years. He lived the life, and died the death of a Christian. The township has lost a faithful citizen, his family a good husband and father, and the Baptist Church a devoted member. HR 7/8/1878

Boy Starrey 1878.07.01
Monday or Tuesday of last week, Mr. Daniel Starrey’s boy, a little fellow seven years old, while picking cherries on John McNish’s farm, fell from a tree and was picked up senseless. Soon after, he and another little boy were riding a horse and he fell and the horse stepped on his abdomen near the groin. His parents did not know of his being hurt, but noticed Thursday that he was feverish. The doctor was called, but nothing serious was anticipated until Sunday afternoon (July 15, 1878), when he grew worse rapidly, and at four o’clock he died. A post mortem examination showed that his bowels had been fearfully bruised rupturing several blood vessels. The funeral was conducted from the house Monday afternoon. The burial was at Pritchard’s Grove. HR 7/19/1878

John Dean 1878.09.01
John Dean, age 48 years, died September 17, 1878. Mr. Dean was born in York State. He lived a portion of each year, for several years, in and about Waterman and has won hosts of friends; to whom the news of his sudden and terrible death brought keenest sorrow. His remains were taken to Jericho Thursday, followed by a large procession. Rev. W. K. Beans, and the Rev. Mr. Paine, of Aurora, conducted the funeral services.
——————–
Mr. John Dean has had a pair of colts running in a pasture on August Leifheit’s farm. Several times lately he has attempted to catch them, but they were wild and he had been unable to do so. Last Tuesday morning he left town about nine o’clock, with a halter, a pan of oats and a three eighths inch rope, about thirty feet long. He told his brother that he was going to try to catch the colt, and would be back by ten o’clock.
The day passed away and he did not return. In the evening, becoming alarmed at his absence, Mr. E. Dean and two or three others, went to the pasture.
They found his hat and the pan, and saw that one of the colts had the rope around its neck. Lanterns were brought and sixty or seventy men joined in a systematic search of the pasture. A shoe was soon found, and at a quarter of nine, he was found, lying on his face, near the center of the pasture, almost stripped of clothing, bruised about the head and shoulders, beyond recognition, dead. As he was turned over on his back the sight was such as to make the stoutest heart quail, and strong men turned away. No marks were found to show that he had been kicked by the colt. His brother soon came with a wagon. He had feared the worst but still the shock came with intolerable severity. The body was placed in the wagon and taken to the Irving house where an inquest was held.
It was evident that he had succeeded in getting a noose over the colt’s head, and that the colt, springing away, the other end of the rope had become entangled around his left wrist, and that he had been dragged to death. He was a single man, of about forty years of age. The funeral took place Thursday morning. The burial was at Jericho. HR 9/20/1878

Lorinda Elmer Thomas 1878.11.07
Mrs. Thomas, nee Elmer, was born in LaFayetteville, Jefferson County, NY September 15, 1845, and expired at her home in Waterman, IL November 23, 1878, being in her 84th year.
She had been sufferer for several years past and although it was known to her friends that her disease was approaching its fatal termination, yet at the last, as is so often the case, death came suddenly and unexpectedly. Her husband was away from home and reached her bedsice but a few moments before she died. Her sisters, Mrs. Whitford and Mrs. Pritchard, were with her during the closing hours of her life. She leaves her husband and two children to mourn the loss of a devoted wife and loving mother.
Mrs. Thomas was a member of the Baptist Church and, we believe, a sincere Christian. HR 11/29/1878

Delia E. Curry 1878.12.02
Delia E. Curry, only daughter and child of John R. and Delia E. Curry, of Silverton, CO, and granddaughter of John M. Curry of this place, aged 16 months and one day died at Hinckley, IL December 21, 1878. HR 12/27/1878

Rebecca Jane Peterson 1879.01.09
Mrs. Rebecca Jane Peterson, wife of Mr. Christ Peterson, died in Hinckley Sunday, January 5, 1879, after a lingering illness. The deceased was born in Ohio, and was 28 years of age.
Hers was the first interment in the new Greenwood Cemetery, Hinckley, IL. HR 1/10/1879

Anna L. Wagner 1879.01.10
Mrs. Anna L. Wagner, wife of Mr. Joel Wagner, died Tuesday, January 7, 1879 and was buried Thursday. The funeral was at the Baptist Church in Blunt and was attended by a large concourse of relatives and friends. Deceased was 36 years of age, and leaves three children, one an infant, but a few days old.
HR 1/10/1879

Mary Evans 1879.01.11
Miss Mary Evans, daughter of Thomas and Mary Evans, died of diphtheria at 9 o’clock, Sunday morning (January 20, 1879), aged nineteen years and eleven days.
The funeral service was at the M. E. Church Tuesday, and was attended by a large number of the relatives and friends of the deceased, though her mother and two brothers were detained by sickness.
She has passed from the beautiful life which seemed opening before her, to the more beautiful life in the “Far away home of the soul.”
Large are the mansions in thy Father’s dwelling,
Glad are the homes that sorrows never dim,
Sweet are the harps in holy music swelling;
Soft are the tones that raise the holy hymn. WL 1/24/1879

Roy Evans 1879.02.12
Jennie Evans
Roy Evans, aged 1 year and 13 days, died of diphtheria February 19, 1879.
Jennie Evans, aged 8 years, 4 months, and one day, died of the same disease February 24, 1879.
They are the only children of Aricibald and Mary Evans.
HR 2/28/1879

Kate Wilson 1879.02.13
Mrs. Kate Wilson, aged 27 years , wife of Harrison Wilson, died in Hinckley, February 22, 1879 of consumption. The deceased leaves two young children. HR 2/28/1879

Florence E. Watson 1879.02.14
Florence E. Watson, died in Milan, Sunday, February 23, 1879 of membranous croup. She was the youngest child of John and Emily Watson, aged 3 years, 10 months and 16 days.
This little graves speaks not of gloom;
You guess full well who sleeps below,
Such tender songs, such wealth of bloom.
When softest winds are wont to blow,
Oh! Heart of mine be still and wait;
Cradled among the roses beaming,
You will not wake her from her dreaming,
She waits for you at heavens gate.
HR 3/7/1879

Stephen Carsher 1879.03.09
Monday morning (March 3, 1879) at eleven o’clock, Stephen Carsher, a young man of about 22 years of age, attempted to jump on a passing freight train, but the train was going very fast and he only got a hold with one hand, and as it jerked him from the platform, he swung against the car, and fell between the car and platform, and his left limb got across the rail, and several cars passed over, crushing it off about the knee. He was picked up and carried to Dr. Kittel’s office, and then to the Hotel where his limb was amputated by Drs. G. M. Macklin, G. W. Kittel and H. A. York. The shock to his nervous system was too much, however, and the poor boy died about five o’clock p.m.
From statistics we see that 126 deaths occur out of 230 cases where a limb is amputated; and that a greater number die, where a person has been hurt by such a shock as this. An inquest was held Tuesday, and the jury rendered the following verdict:
He had no parents here, having been brought from New York about eight years ago from an orphan asylum. He first lived with Robert Mullins, Jr. and afterwards he lived about, among the farmers as a farm hand, and was a very good one.
This is a sad warning for those of our boys and young men who have been in the habit of jumping on the trains here for pleasure. He was no worse than several others, and he was very good at it, but at last he made a mistake and behold his sad end—cut off in the prime of life. He was about to start for Colorado, but death came and took him.
This is an occasion of peculiar sadness, a funeral without a mourner; alone and in the land of strangers; yet he found willing hands and sympathizing hearts to minister to his wants and alleviate his pains. He died among us no mother to weep for her son or father to contribute to his wants, yet the people of Sandwich cared for him as one of their own. How truly it can be said, in the midst of life we are in death, and of whom may we ask for succor but of thee, O Lord, who for our sins art justly displeased, yet O Lord God most holy, and most merciful Savior, deliver us not unto the bitter pains of eternal death.
Young in years, not having attained manhood, he looked forward to a long life, and was just on the eve of going for dinner, when by a sudden stroke all his plans were changed. Man proposes and God disposes, and in this disposition, which took away from us one so sudden, we have before us a lesson which we can all take to heart. “Be ye also ready, for ye know not at what hour the son of man cometh.
“Blind unbelief is sure to err,
And scan his words in pain,
God is his own interpreter
And he will make it plain.” HR 3/7/1879

Mrs. Barto (Fuller) Van Velzor 1879.03.10
Mrs. Van Velzor, wife of Barto Van Velzor, died in Prairie Du Chein, WI Tuesday morning, March 4, 1879, age 61 years, 9 months and 12 days.
Her remains were brought here for interment. The funeral service was held in the school house Wednesday, March 5th, conducted by Rev. I. U. Hartshorn.
She has for several years past, been troubled with asthma and dropsy, but had recovered sufficiently to attend to her household duties. Her last sickness was typhoid pneumonia, and lasted about five days.
She was a daughter of the late Jacob Fuller, who came to this county with his family from New York in 1936. She was married March 4, 1841, and raised a family of ten children. She was a true companion and kind mother, always looking on the bright side and ready to cheer her husband in time of trouble. The family has the sympathy of a large circle of friends. HR 3/19/1879

Mrs. Wesley West 1879.04.03
Mrs. Wesley West died at LeMars, IA, this morning (April 18, 1879). Her remains are to be brought to Hinckley for burial and will arrive tomorrow, at 12:45 p.m. HR 4/18/1879

John Syme 1898.02.10
John Syme died at his home in Evanston February 21, 1898 of typhoid pneumonia after an illness of ten days. He was born in Edinboro in 1832, and grew to manhood in Belfast, Ireland. He came to Sycamore in 1863, and engaged in the lumber and grain business. For five years he was manager of the R. Ellwood Manufacturing Company. Mr. Syme removed with his family to Evanston in 1886. The remains were brought here for burial on Thursday, and the funeral was held from the Congregational Church under the auspices of the Knight Templars, of which he was a member. HR 3/3/1898
Beulah Morris 1899.02.14
The funeral services for little Beulah Morris, the two and one-half year old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Morris, at the Baptist Church in Hinckley last Saturday afternoon (February 17, 1899), called out a house full of interested, sympathizing relatives and friends. J. Burkhart had the funeral in charge. The casket was white as were also the flowers, which were very beautiful. The bearers were Arthur Ashton, Eddie Price, John Faxon and Ralph Evans. Rev. O. J. Price conducted the services, preaching a very appropriate and suggestive sermon. The singing was by Mr. and Mrs. Austin, Miss Sarah Slater and Mr. William Beiser of the church choir, with a selection by six little girls, namely, Stella Potter, Marjorie Postle, Fanny Heinemeier, Josie Eigle, Elva Ellsman and Ida Menk, with Mrs. C. B. Tripp at the organ. The remains of the dear little one were laid to rest in the West Big Rock Cemetery. The afflicted parents have the sympathy of their many friends and the community at large in this, their irreparable loss.
Before sin could blight or sorrow fade,
Death came with friendly care,
And the opening bud to heaven conveyed,
And bade it blossom there. HR 2/23/1899

Carrie Davis Williams 1903.12.13
Mrs. Carrie Davis Williams died of pneumonia at her home in Aurora, Tuesday last (December 1, 1903) at one o’clock p.m. She was the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Levi Davis of Big Rock and sister to our late lamented fellow citizen, Mr. T. R. Davis.
HR 12/10/1903

Mrs. John (Booth) Lewis 1905.08.20
The remains of Mrs. John Lewis, sister to our Mr. Alexander Booth, arrived in town Friday night last, and were taken to the home of Mr. and Mrs. John E. Jones. Funeral services were held at Mr. John E. Jones’ residence last Saturday afternoon at 2 o’clock. Rev. W. E. Way, of the M. E. Church officiating. The singing was by Mrs. F. E. Graves and Mrs. William Beiser with Miss Mattie Gerlach as accompanist. There was a large attendance of friends and neighbors. Mrs. Lewis died Wednesday night, August 9, 1905 at her home in West Pullman. She had been an invalid for nine years, a great sufferer, but a most patient one. She leaves to mourn her loss, besides her brother, her husband and two adopted children. The burial was at the West Big Rock Cemetery. Mr. Booth, who is one of our well known and most estimable citizens has the heartfelt sympathy of his many friends, as do the bereft husband and children. HR 8/17/1905

Cornelius Taylor 1909.11.14
The Belleville, KS Telescope, under the date of November 19, 1909, publishes a long obituary notice of Mr. Cornelius Taylor, who passed away from the effects of a sudden attack of spinal meningitis Wednesday, November 18, 1909. Mr. Taylor will be remembered by the older residents of this vicinity as he was married to Miss Emmeline Sherman in DeKalb on May 12, 1857, and the first three or four years of their married life was spent on a DeKalb County farm. He is the uncle of Zach Taylor of Hinckley and is survived by the widow, three sons and a daughter. HR 12/0/1909
Mrs. Albert (Henderson) Case 1909.11.15
Last Thursday a telegram was received by Mrs. J. L. Seyfrit announcing the death that morning (November 25, 1909) of Mrs. Albert Case at her home in Storm Lake. Mrs. Case was the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John Henderson, early settlers in Squaw Grove Township, who lived on the farm now owned by Thomas Evans. They later removed to Hinckley and built the home in which Prof. Poore now lives, and at a later date removed to Storm Lake, where they bought a farm. Mrs. Case will be remembered by many of our citizens, and had a large number of relatives and friends in this vicinity. The funeral was held at Storm Lake on Sunday last and interment was made in the cemetery at that place. HR 12/2/1909

Henry Thorel 1909.12.08
Mr. Henry Thorel died at his home Wednesday afternoon (December 8, 1909) at about 4 o’clock. The funeral will be held on Saturday at 11 o’clock at the German Church, and the burial will be in the Lamb Cemetery, north of Waterman.
While the death of Mr. Henry Thorel of Hinckley was not unexpected, the news of his passing away yesterday afternoon came as a shock to many friends who grieve over the loss of this resident. He has been suffering for several weeks and medical assistance was unable to relieve the condition only temporarily. For over twenty years he has been a resident here and in that theme has won a high place among his circle of acquaintances. As we go to press this morning, the funeral arrangements are still uncompleted, but the service will be held at the German Church in the village at 11 o’clock Saturday morning with Pastor Rathmann in charge. HR 12/2/1909

Letitia Woods Hughes 1909.12.24
The Daily Chronicle of Centralia, IL, under date of December 31, 1909, published the following article regarding the tragic passing away of Mrs. Hughes:
“Mrs. Letitia Hughes, wife of E. F. Hughes, living at the corner of King and Plum Streets, was taken suddenly ill about midnight last night and died within twenty minutes after her illness seized her. The cause of her death is not definitely known, but is believed to have been apoplexy.”
“Mr. and Mrs. Hughes retired about 10 o’clock last night. Both were awake a little before twelve. About twelve o’clock Mrs. Hughes told Mr. Hughes that she was in distress and asked that a fire be built immediately. A warm fire was built in less than five minutes. She then asked for a stimulant and expired in a few minutes.”
“With the exception of a chill which seized her about four weeks ago, Mrs. Hughes had been in good health. She was not feeling well last night however, and looked pale, but it was not thought that she was more than slightly ill.”
“Mr. and Mrs. Hughes have lived in Centralia sixteen years and in the county twenty two years. Before moving to Centralia, Mr. Hughes had a farm ten miles west of Chehalis. Later he farmed near Oakville. Mrs. Hughes was forty-eight years old. She leaves, beside her husband, two daughters and a son. The daughters are Mary, aged twenty, and Frances, aged sixteen years. The son, Leslie, is eighteen years old. She also leaves a brother, Wesley Woods who has been living with the family; and another brother, Cyrus, in Monrovia, CA, and a brother William in Waterman, IL.
Lettie Woods was born near Big Rock in 1861 and was the oldest daughter of Mr. and Mrs. David Woods. At the age of three she moved with her parents to Afton Township, coming a year later to Clinton. In 1888 she was united in marriage to E. Frank Hughes. The remains arrived in Waterman Wednesday, January 5, and a short funeral service was conducted Thursday afternoon from the Methodist Church, where Rev. E. J. Allen delivered an appropriate message. Songs were sung by Miss Hipple and Mrs. F. A. Brown with Mrs. M…………….
HR 1/13/1910

Elizabeth Darnell James 1910.01.02
Mrs. Elizabeth James died at her late home on East Church Street, this city, Sunday January 16, 1910, aged 73 years, 11 months and 12 days
Mrs. James has been in ill health the greater part of the time for the past ten or more years. On July 5, 1907 she suffered a stroke of paralysis that affected her right side. After some months she partly recovered the use of the affected parts. A second stroke came on the afternoon of July 16, 1909. Her last illness was the result of a fall on the 18th of last November, in which she suffered a fracture of the right arm and of the right leg. Up until last week she had seemed on the road to recovery; the broken bones had healed and she had for several days, been laid into her chair for a short time each day. For the week preceding her death she had seemed not quite so strong, but there was no decided change until late on Saturday afternoon when she seemed to have suffered another stroke of paralysis. She was conscious and recognized members of the family as late as 7 o’clock Saturday evening, but she gradually grew weaker until 7:50 p.m. Sunday, when the summons came.
Elizabeth Darnell, the daughter of Abram and Susan Owens Darnell, was born on February 4, 1836, in Marshall Co., IL. When she was still a child her parents removed to their late home southeast of Sandwich, in Kendall Co.
On June 27, 1855, nearly 55 years ago, she was united in marriage to Francis M. James, by Edward Walker, at her father’s home. Nine children were born of this union: William H. James, of Topeka, KS; Susan M. Cory, of Paw Paw, IL; Mary E. Weaver, who died December 30, 1885; Clara A. James of Sandwich; George E. James, who died April 9, 1881; Fannie M. Johnson, of Aurora, IL; Ella A. Quilhot, of Shabbona, IL; F. Marion James, of Aurora; Emma C. Browning, of Waterford, OH. She raised the nine children and one grandchild, Alice Weaver Spurgeon, of Coffeyville, KS, to manhood and womanhood.
There survives her, besides her husband, seven children and eleven grandchildren, besides two sisters and four brothers, these being Benjamin A. Darnell, of Plano; Enoch B. Darnell, of Hinckley; Fanny Neer, of Salem OR; James C. Darnell, of LaHarpe, KS; Alfred Darnell, of Plano; Mary Lear. of Brighton, Ontario.
When a girl she joined the Christian Church, later entering the membership of the Baptist Church at Hinckley, in which she continued her membership until she, with her family, removed to Sandwich. In 1901 she transferred her membership to the Baptist Church of Sandwich, of which she remained a faithful member, although, through ill health, she was prevented from often participating in the public worship.
To the friends and loved ones her life has been its own eulogy. It has been a life that has given meaning to the name of Christian. As daughter, sister, wife and mother she was all that those words can mean.
The funeral was held from the home at 11 o’clock Wednesday, January 19th, Rev. J. C. Dent, of Chicago, and Rev. J. F. Catlin, of Sandwich, officiating. Interment was in the family lot at Greenwood Cemetery, at Hinckley.
———————–
Mrs. F. M. James, sister of Mr. E. B. Darnell of Hinckley, passed away at her home in Sandwich Sunday night after a long illness. Mrs. James has suffered from two strokes of paralysis the past few years and it is presumed her demise was due to a third stroke.
For many years Mrs. James was a resident of Squaw Grove Township, living two miles south of Hinckley and she had many friends in this vicinity who are grieved to learn of her illness and death. The funeral was held yesterday and interment made in Greenwood Cemetery.
Mrs. Fry and Mrs. Coster went to Sandwich yesterday to furnish the music at the funeral service. HR 1/20/1910

Otto T. Stahl 1910.01.11
Otto T. Stahl died at his home near Big Rock, Sunday evening, January 9, 1910, from injuries received when a stick of dynamite exploded January 1, 1910, mention of which was made in the Free Press last week. Deceased was born in LaSalle County, IL, May 6, 1870, being 39 years, 7 months and 3 days old. Mr., Stahl was united in marriage to Miss Hattie Wallis, October 26, 1891, four children being born to this union, Lloyd, Gladys, Emory and Lois. During the year 1890 he, in partnership with John Buckardt, engaged in the butcher business in Somonauk, and continued in this capacity eleven years, when he disposed of his business here and bought a farm near Big Rock, which vocation he has followed until his death. He was a kind father and a loving husband, and to know him was to like him, as he was always of a cheerful disposition and had friends by the score here and at Big Rock, and it makes it all the sadder to think that he should be called away when just in the prime of life. After the sad accident happened, all that loving hands and medical skill could do was done for him but of no avail as the injuries he received were too severe. Besides the wife and four children, he leaves to mourn his loss two sisters, Mrs. Henry Miller and Mrs. Frank Schaeffer and one brother, John Stahl of this village.
Funeral services were held at his home at eleven o’clock Tuesday morning, conducted by Rev. Claude Boyer of Plano, and the remains were brought to the home of C. I. Wallis that afternoon. Wednesday afternoon at 12:45 short services were held at the home of Mr. Wallis, and at one o’clock at the German Lutheran Church, conducted by Rev. Suhren who paid a fitting tribute to the deceased. Interment took place in Oak Ridge Cemetery. The Modern Woodmen, of which Mr. Stahl was an honored member, met at their hall at 12:30 and went to the house and marched in a body to the church. He was also a member of the order of Mystic Workers.
————————–
Last week we chronicled the report of the accident at Catville, near Big Rock which lacerated the breast and blew off the left hand of Mr. Otto Stahl, who drew out a drawer in the corn crib, cottoning a stick of dynamite, which exploded and wrought the havoc. Sunday night, January 9, 1910 he passed away, having suffered a week from the injuries.
It will be remembered that Mr. Stahl had been using lots of dynamite lately in blowing stumps and rocks, and kept a portion of the explosive in a drawer in the corncrib.
When he closed the drawer with a sudden jar New Years day, about a half pound of the dynamite exploded. His breast was horribly lacerated, and his left hand was mangled so that the surgeons had to amputate. Other injuries added to his suffering. For a week the doctors have fought to save his life, but nature could not restore the young farmer to health after such an accident. Blood poison developed the last few days of his life, and the end was but a question of time.
Mr. Stahl was forty years old and came to Big Rock from Somonauk about eight years ago. He was one of the highly esteemed farmers of that vicinity, and had hosts of friends who grieve with the widow and four children. The eldest child is a son, sixteen years of age.
The funeral was held from the home, Tuesday morning and the remains shipped to Somonauk for burial. HR 1/13/1910

Joseph Davis 1910.01.20
Another prominent Big Rock farmer died Saturday night (January 8, 1910) at his home south of the Eagle schoolhouse, aged seventy five years. Joseph Davis was born in South Wales, January 20, 1834, and has lived in the Big Rock vicinity over thirty years. Eight children survive him—George, Mrs. David Jenkins, Benjamin, John, James, and Robert of Big Rock; Mrs. Frank Howland, of Michigan, and Joseph, Jr. of Oregon.
HR 1/13/1910

John Alexander Coster 1910.01.21
John Alexander Coster died at his home in Aurora, Sunday afternoon (January 24, 1910) at 2:30 o’clock, after an illness of only four days, which was brought on from an old would upon his hand. Deceased was born near Albany, NY, and was sixty-eight years of age. He came to Illinois fifty-five years ago and settled in Kaneville, from there moving to Hinckley where he resided sixteen years, and twenty years ago he moved to Aurora, which has since been his home.
He is survived by a widow, a son, Edgar, of Aurora, a grandson, Elbert Coster, and a sister, Mrs. John Phillips of Kaneville.
The funeral was held at the home Tuesday afternoon, and yesterday morning the remains were brought to Hinckley and brief services held at the grave in Greenwood cemetery where he was laid to rest. Pastor Lott of the Methodist Church officiating. The bearers were{ John Cole, William Williams, John Bauder, Ed. and John Phillips and Elmer Todd.
Those accompanying the remains to Hinckley were: the widow, Mrs. Coster, Edgar Coster and wife and son Elbert of Aurora; Mr. and Mrs. Frank Hampton of Paw Paw, Miss Mollie Hitchcock of Decatur, Mr. and Mrs. Elmer Todd of Aurora, John Cole of Geneva, William Williams of Aurora, Ed and John Phillips of Kaneville and Frank Potter of Aurora. HR 1/27/0910

Inga Beck Johnson 1910.01.22
The death angel was an angel of mercy when it called Mrs. Jasper A. Johnson at her home in Hinckley Saturday night (January 29, 1910) shortly after five o’clock. For a long time she has been a sufferer from cancer, and her taking away was a merciful deliverance from the agony of living.
Miss Inga Beck was born in Thisted, Denmark, sixty years ago the fifteenth of next May, and was married to Mr. Johnson in the old country. After arriving in America they first settled in Plano, then moved to Chicago, and about three years ago removed to Hinckley where the family has since made it a home. Besides the husband, five children survive her. They are: Mrs. C. C. Larson, Christ L. Johnson, John P. Johnson and Amos E. Johnson of Hinckley and Mrs. H. E. Wallace of Milwaukee, WI.
The funeral was held Tuesday afternoon from the home, in charge of Rev. Mr. Rathmann, and the pall bearers were members of the Danish Brotherhood, of which Mr. Johnson is a member. Interment was in Greenwood Cemetery. The bearers were: John P. Johnson, Hans Peterson, Christ Anderson, George Hanson, Peter Jorgenson, Nels Johnson.
Mr. Johnson and family desire to express their thanks for the kindness shown to them during this sad period. HR 2/3/1910

Bela Addison Coy 1910.01.23
After an illness of two months, Bela Addison Coy died January 30, 1910 at the home in Odebolt, IA. July 8, 1824 he was born at Pitcher, NY, where in early youth he worked in a store and in 1852 was united in marriage to Deletta Crandall, who survives. To them were born five children, two preceding the father to the great beyond and the three remaining are—John, Charles and Ned—all residents of Odebolt. The living grandchildren are fourteen.
The Coy family emigrated to Illinois in 1855, where he became interested in the mercantile business at Kaneville. Between 1875 and 1879 he conducted a business at Waterman moving from here to Cook County.
Of the eight brothers and three sisters, only two are now left, Pierce of California and Mrs. Fink of Kaneville. Mrs. Charlie Tomkins, Sr. of Waterman is a niece of Mr. Coy. The older citizens who knew Mr. Coy admired him for his strong intellect.
HR 2/10/1910

Charles Brathwaite 1910.01.24
Rev. Charles Brathwaite, formerly pastor of the Waterman Baptist Church, died January 30, 1910 on the steamer Laurentic while returning from a visit to his old home in England. He was 66 years old, and leaves four sons. The funeral was held Tuesday, February 3, at the Rogers Park Baptist Church, Chicago. It is about twenty years since Mr. Brathwaite was located here. HR 2/10/1910

Isaac Morris Hay 1910.02.10
Isaac Morris Hay was born in New York City, December 9, 1835, and had therefore passed the 74th milestone of life’s journey, departing this life at his home in Sandwich on Monday, February 21, 1910, at a few minutes before the hour of noon.
Mayor Hay was taken sick a couple of weeks ago and during later days there was a noticeable improvement in his condition. On Monday morning he seemed brighter than ever and his devoted wife and children had every reason to hope for an improvement in his condition. About eleven o’clock a change for the worse came and within a short period of less than an hour he had passed away.
His father, George P. Hay, of Scotch descent, was for many years a clothing merchant and tailor in Sandwich and departed this life February 11, 1887, at the age of 82 years. His mother, Harriet Morris Hay, of Holland Dutch descent, survived the husband and died on February 28, 1898, at the ripe old age of 96 years.
It was therefore with much concern that he viewed the fatal attack of illness in February, saying to his only surviving sister, Mrs. Harriet Paine, one day some two weeks ago, to take good care of herself during February, as it seemed to be a fatal month for the family.
His parents, seeking the broader business opportunities of the middle west, came to Illinois in the early days of 1837, when Mr. Hay was but two years of age. The family located at Yorkville, on the Fox River, and it was here that he as a boy developed in those early days in a humble home, on very meager circumstances, and where the surroundings and enjoyments were those of nature. It was this kind of sturdy pioneer life that gave the deceased his opportunity, and meager as it was, he cheerfully embraced it and started the struggle by such schooling in winter as the opportunity offered, working out in the summertime. His education was therefore one in the main of self instruction and ability to comprehend by the costly school of observation and experience.
His early enjoyments found their greatest expression in fishing, bathing and swimming which the Fox River afforded, and in later life his greatest enjoyment and recreation was a trip to the river from the farm, in which he would take the entire family for the day and in which the children would romp and play in the woods, play in the sand, or bathe in the water, while he fished to his heart’s content. It certainly was nature’s ideal way for pleasure and enjoyment. It was this practice in his farm life which broke up the monotony of it, and many of us can remember the old three seated covered carriage, which he called the “Black Maria”, with the family all in, winding its way from the farm, through Sandwich, to the river.
He began the practice of the successful life he led by “hiring out” as a farm hand at five dollars a month at a time when wages were the lowest in the history of the country and money was scarce. He worked around and in the present city of Sandwich and helped gather in the harvest from the fields where are now located some of the most beautiful homes in the city. At length he determined to invest in a farm, and on January 1, 1864, purchased what is known as the “home farm” on Section 19, of Somonauk Township, going in debt for nearly the entire purchase price, relying on his strength and courage to carry him through, borrowing the money at 10 per cent, interest. In 1867 the farm was clear of debt and he has since transformed it into one of the best farms in the county, being one of the very first to begin systematic drainage by tiling and at a time when many people believed that by such means the country would be ruined by resulting droughts. He was also a firm and steadfast believer in the value of trees in the development of the farm and it was always his aim to set out some trees each year, and he took great delight in watching their growth and development. His garden contained always the first vegetables of the season and his devotion to a well kept garden always loaded the house table with the best and freshest of vegetables. As a provider of a well furnished table, he had few equals–never wanting any one to leave unless the cravings of hunger were absolutely satisfied. He enjoyed the keeping of an apiary and his honey has always been in great demand.
On January 16, 1866 Mr. Hay was united in marriage to Miss Aurelia Latham, who survives him, and in all these long years has been his cheerful companion and helpmate. She was a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Latham, among the very early pioneer settlers of Somonauk Township and DeKalb County.
To them were born seven children, of whom five sons survive, Walter M. Hay, born November 25, 1871, now Circuit Clerk and Recorder of DeKalb County and residing at Sycamore; Archie Thomas, born February 24, 1876, and residing in Aurora; Charles P., born January 17, 1878, residing on what is known as the Paine farm, west of Sandwich; Fred L., born December 16, 1879, residing on the old homestead, and George I., born October 11, 1884, and living on what is known as the Abery farm. Two daughters await the coming of the father on the other shore, Julia Helen, born December 8, 1869, dying at the age of six months, and Hattie A., born March 23, 1894, passing away April 1, 1904, just one month after they had retired from farm life and moved to Sandwich.
Mr. Hay has figured prominently in community affairs, his worth and ability being widely known and recognized by his fellow townsmen and who have kept him almost continually in office. He was highway commissioner of Somonauk Township for twenty four years and the excellent gravel roads are due, in a great degree, to his efforts and hid progressive spirit in this connection. He served for seven years as a drainage commissioner of the Victor Township Drainage District. Before the township of Somonauk was divided, he was elected to serve his township on the county board, an office which he held for four years. As a school director he served thirty years. In 1907 he was elected Mayor of Sandwich, and again in 1909, in which capacity he served his constituents well and faithfully, always deeply concerned in the good order of the city and giving all attention necessary to the faithful discharge of his duties. At the time of his death he was president of the Oak Ridge Cemetery Association and it was his ambition to see the City of the Dead beautified with gravel drives and beds of flowers. It was under his administration that the fund for the plan of perpetual care was adopted by the Association.
He always maintained a deep interest in the success of the Republican Party, of which he has been a staunch advocate since its organization.
Mr. Hay has led a busy, active and useful life and his well directed labors have been rewarded with a goodly measure of success. When the summons came he was prepared to go.
Of a family of seven children, Mr. Hay being the second, but one, Mrs. Harriet Paine, survives.
To mourn his loss are left a nephew, George L. Hay, whom was reared to manhood in the family of Mr. and Mrs. Hay, a half brother, Mr. Ed J. Smith and one grandson, Isaac Morris Hay.
Sandwich has lost an efficient, careful, conservative executive officer, the city an honored and respected citizen, the wife and children an indulgent and considerate husband and father and all of us a true and staunch friend and advisor.
The funeral services were held Wednesday afternoon at the Congregational Church, the auditorium being filled with sorrowing relatives and friends, many coming from distant places, from Somonauk and from his old neighborhood. Two beautiful eulogies were given by Dr. J. M. Lewis and Dr. G. H. Robertson, the latter having had a close acquaintance with him for more than forty five years.
Many beautiful floral pieces and bouquets of flowers came from friends of the family and relatives, among the number being two handsome pieces from the council and fire department, members of both organizations attending the funeral services in a body.
The pall bearers were S. P. Sedgwick, F. A. Pratt, John H. Latham, George Mahan, H. A. Severy and Charles A. Patten.
Music was furnished by a quartet, Mrs. A. E. Woodward, Miss Hazel Crofoot, the latter giving a beautiful solo, and Messrs. E. E. Wallace and F. J. Newton, with Mrs. E. E. Wallace as accompanist.
———————————
Isaac M. Hay, Mayor of Sandwich, and father of DeKalb County’s Circuit Clerk, Walter M. Hay, passed away at his Sandwich home Monday morning following a severe attack of pneumonia. Mr. Hay had been confined to the bed for some time, but the last few days his condition was encouraging and it was thought he was on the road to recovery, when the relapse occurred which proved fatal. The funeral was held from the Congregational Church yesterday afternoon and was attended by a large gathering of friends and relatives.
Mayor Hay has been a central figure in city politics in Sandwich for many years, and has been the promoter of many of the best improvements to the city. He was elected the last time on the license ticket after one of the hottest fights in the political history of Sandwich, and his keen business intellect has proven him one of the most efficient mayors the city has ever elected. He has many friends in this vicinity who extend their sympathy to the bereaved family He was about seventy five years of age. HR 2/24/1910

Claude Jay 1910.02.13
Claude Jay, the Aurora youth whose legs were cut off by a train he was working on at Rochelle Saturday, died Sunday forenoon (February 6, 1910) at the St. Charles Hospital, Aurora, where he was taken after the fatal accident. This young man was born in Sandwich in 1881, and was a cousin of Howard Jay, well known to many of the young people here.
———————–
Friday night at Rochelle, Claude Jay of Aurora met with an accident that proved fatal Sunday. He will be remembered as a painter and paper hanger at Waterman three years ago, and was a brakeman the past two months. As he climbed to the top of the box cars carrying orders to the engineer, he fell with his legs across the rail and the moving train terribly crushed and mangled both members. When the engineer failed to receive the orders, he stopped his train and ran back along the track discovering the suffering man.
A wife and three children survive him. HR 2/10/1910

Raymond Parisot 1910.02.16
Raymond, the five year old son of Mr. and Mrs. John Parisot of Waterman died Wednesday, February 9, 1910 after suffering from acute appendicitis. The lad was stricken Sunday, three days previous to his death. Everything was done for him that the profession advises, and Tuesday evening as a last resort, an operation was performed at Dr. Wilkinson’s hospital, Dr. Greeley assisting. He rallied from the anesthetic only for a few hours, when death cane and claimed him. The funeral was held Saturday at the Somonauk Catholic Church HR 2/17/1910.

William Henn 1910.02.18
A message was received here last Friday conveying the sad news of the sudden death of paralysis of William Henn at his home at Eldora, IA, Thursday, February 17, 1910, at the advanced age of 82 years, 11 months and 5 days. Deceased was a resident of this vicinity about thirty five years ago and leaves a number of relatives in Somonauk and vicinity to mourn his loss.
————————
The Herald of Eldora, IA, under date of February 24, 1910, contains the following obituary data of William Heun:
William Huen was born in Rhae, Dukedom of Nassau, Germany, March 23, 1827, and died at his home in Eldora, Thursday evening (February 17, 1910) at 8:30, in the 83rd year of his age. He came to New York in 1850 and thence to Waterman in 1871. He moved to Grundy County in 1886 on a farm five miles east of Eldora. In 1903 he moved to Eldora where he remained until his death.
He was married to Margaret Betz, February 3., 1857. Nine children were born to them, of whom seven are now living, Mrs. Charlotte Ray of Shabbona, IL; Mrs. Emma Mercer of Chicago; Theodore, Arthur, Laura, Fernando and Edgar living in or around Eldora. The two deceased were Emil and Amanda.
He was a veteran of the Civil war and served in the 144th Illinois Volunteer Infantry. The funeral services were held in the Baptist Church Saturday afternoon, Rev. W. E. Stanley officiating, assisted by Pastor I. E. Carney of the Church of Christ. The preacher paid a kind and just tribute to the fine Christian character and patriotism of the deceased.
HR 3/3/1910

Mrs. John (Nehring) Schultz Spangenberg 1910.02.21
The angel of death called two residents of Hinckley during the last few days–Mrs. Spangenberg and Henry Schele. Mrs. Spangenberg was eighty three years old, an invalid, and for the past four or five years she had been making her home with her niece, Mrs. Pauline Granart in the east part of town. Deceased was a sister of William Nehring, and is survived also by a daughter. Death came to her release Friday morning (February 10, 1910) and the funeral was held Sunday, conducted by Rev. Mr. Rathmann. John Nehring was here from Aurora and Adolph Nehring from Sycamore to attend the funeral. Interment was made in Greenwood Cemetery.
Deceased was born November 18, 1826, in the Duchy of Brandenberg, Germany. Her first husband, Mr. Schultz, died and she came to America in 1869. In 1877 Mrs. Schultz was married to John Spangenberg, who died in 1904. HR 2/17/1910

Henry Schele 1910.02.22
Monday of this week (February 14, 1910) another one of the older residents of Hinckley, and a native of Germany, passed away, when Henry Schele was called to his last reward. Mr. Schele was born in the Province of Hanover, Germany, January 15, 1833, and at the age of thirty years was married to Wilhelmine Pinkernell, coming to America at once to make their new home. They came direct to this neighborhood, where his wife passed away in 1877, and not until 1906 did he marry again, when Mrs. Frederike Melhorn became his bride. They have been residents of the village since 1906 when they moved into town from the farm, and his acquaintance in this neighborhood numbers a wide circle of friends to whom his passing away is a sincere grief. One son and two daughters survive him. The funeral was held from the house and the German Church yesterday afternoon, conducted by Rev. Mr. Rathmann. A large number of friends paid their last respects.
The pall bearers were: August Weddige, Henry Anspach, Henry Weddige, August Reimensnider, William Menk and Conrad Wilkening. HR 2/17/1910

Son Biensen 1910.02.23
Mr. and Mrs. George Reimensnider were summoned to State Center, IA, last week by telegraph, called by the illness of their little grandson, son of Mr. and Mrs. George A. Biensen. Before the grandparents could arrive at State Center, the little fellow had returned to his Maker and had been interred. He was afflicted with spinal meningitis. The mother is a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Reimensnider, and friends here are extending their sympathy in this sad hour. It is the first of the grandchildren to pass away. HR 2/17/1910

Christian Larsen 1910.02.24
Suffering the past three years with occasional periods of mental trouble, and the past two weeks afflicted with a complication which gave every symptom of pneumonia, Christian Larsen was ready for the merciful visit of the death angel which released him from the agony of his condition. He was a popular man in this community, a kind friend and neighbor, and the news of his death brought sorrow to a wide circle of acquaintances.
Christian Larsen was a sturdy Dane. He was born in Denmark, in the Province of Hjorring, June 23, 1863, and came to America in 1885. In 1888 he returned to his native town and married Mess Caroline Nelsen, and after the ceremony they started for America, the couple settling in this vicinity, where they have resided ever since.
Mr. Larsen’s illness dates back about three years, and every effort has been put forth by the physicians to relieve him. He passed away Friday, February 25, 1910, at his home south of Hinckley. The funeral was held Monday, conducted by Rev. Mr. Rathmann of the St. Paul Church, who spike comforting words to the sorrowing family. Deceased was a member of the Danish Brotherhood, a large number of the members of that society attending in a body, and at the grave in Greenwood they executed the impressive burial service of the order. The bearers were members of the brotherhood;
Those surviving Mr. Larsen are the widow and six children—two daughters and four sons in this vicinity; the aged father, now about ninety years old, and two sisters in Denmark; one brother a Baptist clergyman, in Minnesota, who was unable to get here for the funeral.
The family desires to thank the kind neighbors and friends for the many acts of sympathy, and those who tendered the beautiful flowers. HR 3/3/1910

Daniel Grimm 1910.02.25
The Caldwell News of Caldwell, KS, contains the obituary notice of Mr. Daniel Grimm, an uncle of the Grimm boys of this vicinity, who passed away at the Oklahoma City Hospital February 3, 1910. Many of the older residents of Hinckley and surrounding country will remember Mr. Grimm and regret to learn of his demise.
Deceased was born in Elizabethville, PA, in 1838. And when twenty eight years of age was married to Miss Mary Shoop, They moved to Illinois which was than the “frontier” and settled near Hinckley, living here about twenty five years. They then moved to Kansas and settled six miles from Caldwell on a farm of 320 acres, which then contained no improvements, with the exception of a little house fourteen feet square. He was a veteran of the Civil war and was on the memorable march with Sherman to the sea. His wife died about seven years ago. He is survived by six children—three sons and three daughters.
HR 3/3/1910

Cyrus T. Slater 1910.03.23
The telephone message which brought the sad news to Mr. P. F. Slater of Hinckley, Saturday evening, telling of the death of his brother, Cyrus T. Slater at his home in Aurora, spread a pall over this territory where deceased numbered his friends by the hundreds, and where he had lived many years of his life. It was one of those unexpected messages which come like a bolt from a clear sky. Just a week or so before he was in Hinckley, shaking hands with his friends, mingling with old acquaintances, and spreading the sunshine which seemed to emanate from the very heart of Cyrus T. Slater. He was a congenial personage—a character with whom it is good to mingle, and his taking away Saturday night was one of the most sudden deaths recorded here in recent years.
Cyrus T. Slater was born November 28, 1848, near Sugar Grove, IL. His parents were Philo and Sallie Slater. Soon after his birth his parents moved to Squaw Grove, where he lived until six years ago when he moved to Aurora where he resided until the time when the Master called him home suddenly on Saturday evening, March 12, 1910.
On April 20, 1871 he was united in marriage to Miss Rosella J. Tanner. To them four children were born, all of whom are living: Charles H. of St. Louis, MO; Mrs. Ida V. Nichols of Chicago; Mrs. Sarah R. Beiser of Plato Center, IL, and Frank C. of Seattle, WA.
Mr. Slater was converted to God at the age of nineteen, and in 1877 with his wife he united with the Baptist church, of which he was a constant and zealous member up to the time of his death He was one of those members upon whom his pastor can always depend.
For many years Mr. Slater has been an active member of Hinckley Camp, 880, Modern Woodmen of America, which order he served in various official capacities.
Those who survive him are his wife and children, three little grandchildren, together with one brother, Fernando Slater of Hinckley, and two sisters, Mrs. Mary S. White of Gibbonsville, ID and Mrs. Eva N. Benton of LaGrange, IL.
Funeral services were held from the Galena Street Baptist Church in Aurora Tuesday afternoon, the bearers being his son–Charles H. Slater, his two sons-in-law—Will E. Nichols and Will J. Beiser—and a nephew, Albert Easterbrooks. The remains were brought to Hinckley yesterday morning where they were met by a detachment of one hundred Woodmen, and taken to Greenwood Cemetery, where the Woodman ritual was exemplified. HR 3/24/1910

Sadie Banbury Adams McWethy 1910.04.10
Mrs. Edward McWethy of Hinckley, died suddenly Tuesday afternoon (April 12, 1910) at Aurora as the result of heart failure, following ptomaine poisoning. Mrs. McWethy underwent a surgical operation at the Aurora City Hospital some months ago and recovered sufficiently to return to her home in Hinckley. Several weeks ago she became very ill with what was diagnosed as ptomaine poisoning, following the eating of infected meat, it was believed. The poison so inflamed the mucous membrane of the stomach and intestines that it was thought best to take her to the hospital that she might have the constant attention of her Aurora physician. Her heart had been weakened by the recent illness but it was believed that she was doing as well as could be hoped.
Her physician had left the hospital but a few moments when an alarming condition was noted, and despite every aid that could be given, she sank away shortly before two o’clock.
Mrs. McWethy before her marriage was Mrs. Sadie Adams of Hinckley and for many years conducted the Adams Hotel. She is survived by her husband, one son, Charles Adams of Iowa, and one sister Miss Emma Banbury, of Aurora.
——————–
Sad, indeed, was the news which flashed over the wires from Aurora Tuesday afternoon, telling of the death of Mrs. E. C. McWethy of Hinckley. Though relatives and friends had hoped against hope for many days, still the shock of the finality of all things was acute, and this locality loses one of its most striking characters, and one of the grandest of women.
Mrs. McWethy’s name will go down in the history of this village as one of those who played a great part in the establishment of the reputation of the vicinity. It was her management of the Adams House before her marriage to Mr. McWethy, which won this town up and down the entire Burlington system, the reputation of being one of the best towns in the country. Her personality—her influence—her executive ability were noted and felt, not only in the hostelry, but the influence of her characteristics effected other lines of business in town and there was a general painstaking to keep other things in keeping with the local hotel.
Mrs. McWethy has been a sufferer for many weeks. She underwent an operation at the hospital some weeks ago; recovered slightly and was brought back home; a few days ago she was again taken to the hospital, and there just when it was thought a slight change for the better had taken place, a sudden reversal of conditions brought on the end Tuesday afternoon. The funeral is being held today, and burial will be made in Aurora. She is survived by her husband, Mr. E. C. McWethy of the McWethy Brothers’ Insurance Company, and son, Charles Adams of Clear Lake, IA, and a sister, Miss Emma Banbury of Aurora. HR 4/14/1910
———————–
When the east bound morning passenger train pulled out of Hinckley Friday morning, it bore all that remains earthly of one of Hinckley’s best known women—Mrs. E. C. McWethy. A brief recount of her death was given in last week’s issue. She passed away at the Aurora Hospital Tuesday afternoon, April 12, 1910 and Thursday her remains were brought to Hinckley where the funeral services were held at the home, conducted by Rev. L. B. Lott of the Methodist Church, in which church Mrs. McWethy has for many years been an ardent and conscientious worker.
Not for may months has such a gathering of people met in this village to pay the last sad rites to a departed friend. The entire county of DeKalb was represented in those attending from a distance. Friends were here from other counties and other states, all attesting the remarkable characeristics of Mrs. McWethy as she had lived among her associates. Friday morning the body was again taken to Aurora, where it was interred in Spring Lake Cemetery. The bearers were J. B. Pogue, John H. Clark, M. J. Foster, P. F. Walter and A. J. Coster.
An excerpt from the obituary as read at the funeral briefly tells of the life and career of Mrs. McWethy.
“Mrs. Sarah McWethy was born in the town of Squaw Grove, near the farm now owned and occupied by Wm. Weiss, February 25, 1837. She spent her girlhood and younger life with a sister, Mrs. Charles Taylor, now passed away, on the farm at present occupied by Mrs. Favor, and known for many years as the Charles Taylor farm.”
“She has resided in and about Hinckley most of her life, and so was one of our best known townspeople. She was closely identified with the church and social life of this community, having rendered glad assistance in every time of need. She united with the Methodist Church in Hinckley in September 1897, during the pastorate of Bro. Fisk, and has been one of the active workers in the Aid Society.”
“She was married to Mr. E. C. McWethy February 6, 1902, and they have made their home here among us in Hinckley.”
“In January 1910, Mrs. McWethy was taken with a severe illness, but a little later seemed much improved, but when recovery was most promising, she was stricken again with a poisoned condition of the blood, and after weeks of suffering, yet weeks of patient hopefulness of recovery on her part, she passed away at the Aurora Hospital, Tuesday, April 12, 1910.”
There are left to survive her: her husband, E. C. McWethy; a son by a former marriage, Charles F. Adams of Clear Lake, IA, and a sister, Miss Emma Banbury of Aurora.”
“If measured by length of years, her life was not long; if measured from the standpoint of exceptional opportunities for education, her life was not great, but measured from the point of usefulness, helpfulness, of large-heartedness, hers was a strong personality. She was known for her kind heart, and her kindly helpfulness, her industry, and her careful frugality.”
For the present, and as long as it is possible for him to do so, Mr. McWethy will retain the pleasant home in Hinckley. Miss Gertie Kesner, who has been much with Mrs. McWethy, will have charge of the house, and Mr. McWethy will always find everything as homelike as can be made without the presence of her, who for years, was the center of the home. He wishes in these columns to express his sincere gratitude to all the friends and neighbors who performed so may kind offices during the recent bereavement, and especially to the ladies of the aid society who took entire charge of the home and filled every possible want and need.
Charles Adams and wife, he being Mrs. McWethy’s son, left here the latter part of the week for Waterman where they visited with the William Charlesworth family before returning to their home in Clear Lake, IA.
Among those present from out of town were:
Mr. and Mrs. Charles Adams, Clear Lake, IA.
Mr. and Mrs. Henry McWethy, Mrs. James McWethy, Augustus and Beth McWethy, Mrs. F. M. Nobles and daughter, Mrs. Nichols of Riverside; Mrs. and Mrs. Roy McWethy; Miss Minnie McWethy; Dean McWethy; Mrs. Frank McWethy; D. A. Nobeles; Miss Emma Banbury; John Murphy and daughter, Mrs. Moore of Aurora; Mr. and Mrs. Weber, Misses Nellie Leigh and Edith Smith, Chicago; Mrs. Welch, Oswego; Mrs. Ida Harbour, Riverside; Mrs. Emma dyer, LaGrange; Hon. And Mrs. A. C. Cliffe, Sheriff and Mrs. Dan Hohm, Sycamore; Mr. and Mrs. George Jackson, Shabbona; Mr. and Mrs. R. Boget, Mr. Hoepner, Miss Amanda Creide, Sandwich. HR 4/21/1910

Mrs. Obed Nichols 1910.04.17
Mrs. Obed Nichols died Friday evening (April 22, 1910) a little past six o’clock at the home five miles northeast of town, after a week’s illness. She was the daughter of Elmer Bushnell of this place. She leaves to mourn her loss, her husband and two children, a little boy nine years old and a babe eight months old, besides a host of friends and relatives. The funeral was held Saturday afternoon at the Baptist Church and the interment made in Greenwood Cemetery.
———————–
Lettie Bushnell Nichols
The past week chronicles the death of another of Squaw Grove Township’s old settlers—Mrs. O. C. Nichols, who passed away at her home Friday, April 22, 1910. Mrs. Nichols was one of the Bushnell family, who are counted among our oldest settlers. She had a host of friends and acquaintances who grieve with the husband and relatives who are left to mourn her loss.
Lettie Bushnell, daughter of Elmer and Pauline Bushnell, was born in Squaw Grove Township, August 2, 1868, where she lived until three years ago where, with her husband, she removed to a farm near Big Rock, where she was residing at the time of her death. She united with the Baptist Church of Hinckley in the summer of 1889, and was a loyal and faithful member. She was married to Mr. O. C. Nichols June 10, 1897.
She is survived by her husband, two sons—Elmer P. and Melvin C.—her father, a sister, Miss Lillie Bushnell, and a brother, George Bushnell, all of Hinckley, IL.
The funeral was held from the Baptist Church Sunday afternoon, conducted by the pastor of the Baptist Church at Big Rock, who spoke comforting words to the bereaved family. The bearers were Melvin Foster, Edgar Foster, William Lewis, Charles Stiefboldt, Arthur Hall and William James. Interment was in Greenwood Cemetery, Hinckley, IL. HR 4/28/1910

Wilhelmine Baie Leifheit 1910.04.19
Mrs. William Leifheit passed away at her home in Hinckley Saturday, April 2, 1910, the immediate cause of death being pneumonia. Mrs. Leifheit was taken ill about the twenty second of March, and for a week or more her life hung in the balance. She was one of the older residents of Squaw Grove and for many years has been a faithful member of the German, Evangelical Lutheran Church, of which Rev. F. Kroeger is pastor, he having charge of the services Tuesday.
Wilhelmine Baie was born September 9, 1848 at Wenzen, Braunschweig, Germany, and when about nine years of age she came to America with her parents. The first four or five years of the family’s stay in America was spent in Sandwich Township, then they moved to Squaw Grove, and she has lived in the vicinity of Hinckley ever since. She was married to William Leifheit November 22, 1869, and to them were born twelve children, two of the daughters having preceded their mother to the great beyond. Deceased was 61 years, 6 months and 24 days old at the time of her death.
The husband and ten children are left to mourn the loss of a loving wife and tender mother, there being four sons and six daughters. Thirty-two grandchildren will be without their grandmother.
The funeral was held from the home Tuesday afternoon at one o’clock, and a large gathering of friends, and relatives were present. The remains were taken from there to the church northwest of town, and interment made in the German Cemetery.
Among those from out of town to attend the funeral were:
Mr. and Mrs. William Thurow, Mr. and Mrs. Herman Dhuse, Mr. and Mrs. Fred Dhuse, Fred Henne, August Wollenweber and Ed Schur of Yorkville; Mr. and Mrs. Emmett Leifheit and Julius Fritag and daughter of Aurora; Harry Jost of Chicago; Henry Rathe and daughter, Rosa of Chicago; Rev. C. Schrader and wife of Tobias, NE, Mrs. Stirred being a daughter of the deceased; Mr. and Mrs. Henry Ilsman and daughters of DeKalb; Mr. and Mrs. Albert Dannewitz, of Somonauk; Mr. and Mrs. William Backman of Earlville; Mr. and Mrs. Herman Hartman of Sycamore; Prof. Hoffman of Aurora, who played the organ during the services.
The family desires to express their gratitude to the friends and relatives who performed many kind offices during the illness and death of the wife and mother. HR 4/7/1910

Rebecca Dunn 1910.04.20
Rebecca Dunn was found dead at the home of William Davis Monday (April 11, 1910) about noon. She had complained during the night and Mrs. Dakin, cousin of Mr. Davis, residing with him, was aroused and attended her In the morning she was able to get up but not feeling well, went again to her room where she was thought to be resting. She was fifty years of age. One sister resides in Texas and a brother at Aurora. Ethel Dunn, a niece, is at the Aurora Hospital just recovering from appendicitis; Miss Dunn had been housekeeper several years for Mr. Davis and since a serious attack of blood poisoning two years ago she had been with her sister in Texas but returned and made her home where she died. Burial will take place at the South Big Rock Cemetery. HR 4/14/1910
Alphie William Burmester 1910.04.21
Alphie Willliam Burmester, one of the twin sons of Mr. and Mrs. Fred Burmester, born February 14, 1910, died April 16, 1910, aged two months and two days. Funeral was held Monday, April 18, conducted by Rev. F. Kroeger of the Squaw Grove Lutheran Church. Interment was in the Lutheran Cemetery. The pall bearers were four small boys between the ages of ten and twelve years. HR 4/18/1910

Kenneth Davis 1910.05.15
Kenneth Davis, three year old son of Mr. and Mrs. Paul Davis, who live near Aurora, wandered away from his farm home Tuesday morning (May 3, 1910) and fell into the Blackberry Creek. His little body was not found until yesterday; it having been in the water abour twenty four hours. The little fellow was the grandson of Mr. and Mrs. Richard Michaels of Big Rock, prominent farmers out this way, and their many friends grieve with them in this sad tragedy. HR 5/5/1910

Peter Lautwein 1910.05.16
The second drowning in three years occurred at the Yorkville dam Tuesday morning, (May 3, 1910) when three men from Aurora shot into the swift current and went over the dam in a boat. One of the Aurora men, Peter Lautwein, was drowned. He was caught in the terrible suction pool just under the falls and was absolutely powerless to escape the fury of the whirling waters. His two companions were thrown free of the boat and were able to swim away from the undercurrent. HR 5/5/1910

Conrad Linn 1910.05.17
Conrad Linn, popularly known among his associates as the “Mayor of Danetown,” passed away early this morning (May 5, 1910), after complaining of being chilly. The cause of death is unknown. Deceased was seventy four years of age. He was born in Germany, and had lived in this vicinity about fifty four years.
When the news circulated about town this morning that Conrad Linn had passed away, a general expression of surprise marked the reception of the news. Last Sunday while meeting his friends, Mr. Linn remarked: “Today is my birthday. I am seventy four years old and never had the services of a doctor since I was born.”
This statement attests to the remarkable state of health during his seventy four years of life, and that he should be taken so suddenly is a surprise and sorrow to all. He was about town as usual yesterday, retiring last night at his usual hour.
It is stated by his family that between three and four o’clock this morning, Mr. Linn arose from his bed and went to the kitchen, claiming that he felt chilly. A fire was started in the stove and he moved about the house to secure a circulation of the blood. He returned to his bed, and complained of a continuance of the ill feeling. Dr. J. L. Case was summoned by phone, but before he reached the home, Mr. Linn had passed away.
Deceased leaves a widow, two sons, a daughter and a grandson to mourn his loss. A coroner’s inquest is being held to inquire into the cause of death. It is the opinion that here might have been some pulmonary congestion, which at his advanced age his system was unable to overcome. HR 5/5/1910
Boy Godell 1910.05.18
Monday afternoon of last week while Mr. and Mrs. James Godell’s two little boys were playing in their yard at Cortland, the older child, not yet five years old, struck the younger, not yet two years old, with a hoe, cutting a deep gash in the back of his head. A physician was promptly summoned, and he took several stitches in the wounds but the little one died Wednesday afternoon (May 26, 1910) HR 5/26/1910

Lucy E. Linebarger 1910.05.19
Mrs. Lucy E. Linebarger, known to many of the older residents in Hinckley, widow of the former pastor of the Hinckley Methodist Church, third white child born in the city of Milwaukee, passed away yesterday (May 25, 1910), and the Tribune this morning contains the following obituary data:
Mrs. Lucy E. Linebarger, widow of the Rev. D. I. Linebarger, died yesterday at the residence of her son, former Judge Paul Linebarger, in Milwaukee. Mrs. Linebarger was the granddaughter of Elijah Wentworth, who kept the old Wentworth Tavern at the forks of the Chicago River in 1829. She was born in 1837. She attended Beloit College where she married Dr. Linebarger in 1857. Her children are Charles E. Linebarger, Mrs. Andrew A. Conlon, Dr. I. Linebarger and former Judge Linebarger. HR 5/26/1910

Olive Carlson 1910.06.10
A most distressing accident happened at the south end of the Plano bridge over the Fox River on Saturday evening last, in which the life of a young lady was sacrificed.
Olaf Lindvall and Miss Olive Carlson had left the home of the latter’s brother on the George l. Hay farm for a ride and were going to Plano. Approaching the bridge, they met an Aurora boy, Harry Rowe, on a motorcycle, who was going at a moderate rate of speed.
From the testimony before the coroner’s jury, neither of the occupants of the buggy saw Rowe until he was directly in front of their horse. Rowe puled out to let them pass, when the horse became frightened and rearing, fell upon the buggy, overturning it and rolling down the embankment.
Miss Carlson was caught under the wrecked and tangled buggy, and when picked up was found to be unconscious. Dr. Lord, of Plano, happened that way and took the injured lady to the home of her brother, which is but a short distance away. Everything possible was done to save her life but of no avail, and she passed away early Sunday morning (June 26, 1910) without regaining consciousness, except for a few minutes and was unable to make a statement of the accident.
In rolling down the embankment, Miss Carlson struck the root of a large tree with her head, causing concussion of the brain.
Mr. Lindvall, to whom Miss Carlson was engaged, was also badly injured.
The accident happened in the dusk of the evening and when Rowe saw that he was in danger of collision, he shut off power and wheeled to one side of the road into a bad cut but not before he realized that the buggy with its occupants had plunged into a similar cut on the other side.
Rowe gathered himself together, took his machine to a camp at which he was staying with several other young men, and returned to the scene of the accident. He found that the horse, in an effort to turn, had fallen from the pike and dragged the carriage and its occupants behind him, turning the vehicle upside down.
As soon as he could extricate himself from the overturned carriage, Olaf Lindvall took her to the bridge over which they were just about to pass and attempted to revive her. Her injuries were so serious, however, that he was unsuccessful.
Evidence proved that Rowe was not to blame in the least for the accident, and was acquitted by the jury. The foundation of the evil was laid to the road over which the two parties were driving. Approaching the bridge on the side farthest from Plano, by actual measurement, the carriage road is but eight feet in width. In addition, it is flanked on either side by a 15 foot ditch, making it impossible for two teams to pass, or for one to turn out even for a bicycle without endangering the lives of those implicated. The existing conditions are blamed entirely for the catastrophe of Saturday night, and Mr. Rowe is not held responsible by Mr. Lindvall or by the coroner’s jury which heard the evidence. The funeral services were held Tuesday at half past twelve at the home of her brother, conducted by the pastor of the Swedish Church at Aurora, and were largely attended. The accident was the subject of much discussion and there are many views taken of it. The action of the coroner’s jury will doubtless hasten the commissioners of Fox Township to remedy the evil that has long existed here.
——————-
Miss Augusta Carlson, while riding with her fiancee, Olaf Lindval, to whom she was to have been married in a few days, met her death at the small bridge, south of Plano. The young couple went out for a ride Saturday evening, and were just about to cross the bridge when their horse became frightened at the head-light of an approaching motor cycle. Harry Rowe of Aurora, the motor-cyclist, slowed down his speed as soon as he saw the rig, but it was too late to avoid the tragedy. The horse and carnage, with its occupants, went rolling down the steep embankment, and Miss Carlson was pinned between the buggy and a tree. Her neck was broken and her skull crushed in the awful accident. Dr. Lord was unable to save the young life and she passed away Sunday morning (June 26, 1910). The horse broke its back and it was necessary to put it out of its agony. Mr. Lindval sustained a badly sprained leg. HR 6/30/1910

Mrs. Charles ( ) Borchers Peterson 1910.06.11
Mrs. Charles Peterson, who has been a patient sufferer with cancer for several years, passed away at her home Sunday evening, June 5, 1910. Deceased was born in Gairde, Braunschweig, Germany, May 16, 1848, and came to this country about thirty eight years ago. About ten years later, she was married to William Borchers, who has since passed away, and about fourteen years ago she became the wife of Mr. Peterson. One son, two daughters, the husband, and one brother, are left to mourn her passing away.
Funeral services were held yesterday afternoon at the Squaw Grove German Lutheran Church, Rev. Kroeger conducting the services. HR 6/9/1910

Frank Wade 1910.06.12
Hinckley and Waterman people were astounded Sunday afternoon (June 12, 1910) to hear that Frank Wade of Hinckley had dropped dead on the streets of Waterman, that afternoon from heart disease. He had been complaining for a day or two of rheumatism in the arms and shoulders, and, not feeling able to work, had gone, Saturday morning, to visit his daughter, Mrs. Henry Bergholte, at Waterman. After dinner on Sunday, he went out for a short walk around town, and returning, was about a block from the Bergholte home, when he suddenly dropped to the walk. Dr. Wilkinson was called and restoratives were used but not a spark of life remained. He had been called suddenly to his reward.
The funeral services were held at the M. E. Church in Waterman Tuesday afternoon at one o’clock, Rev. E. J. Aikin, the pastor, preaching the sermon from the text “Be ye also ready for ye know not the day nor the hour when the Son of Man cometh.” Mrs. Brown and Miss Mabel Kirkpatrick, with Miss Mertis Garner presiding at the organ, furnished the music. Messrs. Charles Boekenhauer, August Leifheit, William Ilsman, George Hall, J. E. Hardy and A. C. Kauffman were the pall bearers, and A. J. Heeg was funeral director. The casket was covered with a deep bank of beautiful flowers.
Mr. Wade and family lived in and about Waterman for a number of years, but for several years had been living at Hinckley. Mrs. Wade passed away several years ago and a daughter, Maude, has been making a home for the family since that time.
Mr. Wade was a hard worker, often working beyond his strength, and was well known in this vicinity. He was the father of ten children, all living, and ten grandchildren. He was about 63 years of age, and had seen much of the world’s hard knocks, being left an orphan in boyhood.
Hinckley and Waterman friends extend sympathy to the family in the days when father is taken away.
Mr. Wade was a member of the Methodist Church in Waterman.
Interment was at Greenwood Cemetery, Hinckley, IL.
HR 6/16/1910

Charles Inglow 1910.06.13
When the way freight pulled into Hinckley Friday evening Mr. Inglow left the train and went to the shoe store of Mayor Fred Schmidt to see about getting a pair of shoes repaired for himself and a pair for the head brakeman. When he returned to the depot he “jumped” the train, which was on the south track, switching. He rode east, hanging onto the side of the car, and doubtless forgot, or at least did not notice, the poles which support the roof of the shed over the scales at the Neola Elevator Company’s plant. The train was going at a fair rate of speed. The brakeman struck the poles, which are forty three inches from the flange of the rail, and he was virtually brushed off the side of the car. He was thrown under the wheel. His right arm, right shoulder and the ends of his right ribs were ground to a pulp. A big gash was cut in the back of his head and other bodily injuries which added their fatal effects to the tragedy.
Inglow was a man of iron constitution, a bright cheerful disposition, and a popular favorite on the road. Dr. Owings was summoned and accompanied the injured man to Aurora, where the arm was amputated and every effort made by the surgeons to save the life. He died Tuesday morning (June 28, 1910) at eight o’clock, leaving a widow and a small child. HR 6/30/1910

Lucy Eastman Fearon Little 1910.06.14
Lucy Eastman was born May 24, 1830, at Waterville, Quebec, and died June 27, 1910 in Waterman. December 21, 1851 she was united in marriage to Alfred Fearon, and to them were born two children –J. A. C. Fearon and Ida Fearon, both of this place who were at her bedside during this long final illness. Her husband lost his life by accidental drowning November 21, 1856.
Her second marriage occurred, April 26, 1867, to Obidiah Little and they moved to this county in 1875, where she has continued to reside. Mr. Little died nineteen years ago. She was a member of the Protestant Episcopal Church.
Many friends and neighbors assembled at her home Wednesday morning, where Rev. George Dunlop of the Presbyterian Church conducted a brief service. Interment was in Clinton Cemetery
The family wishes to extend thanks to the friends who assisted them during the mother’s sickness and death; to those who gave flowers; to those who sang and to all who spoke words of comfort and cheer. HR 7/7/1910

Anna Shepard 1910.07.13
Mrs. Anna Shepard, wife of Mr. James Shepard of Aurora, died at the St. Charles Hospital Tuesday night (July 12, 1910) after a brief illness. Mrs. Shepard was the sister-in-law of Mrs. J. B. Pogue, and a cousin of Mrs. U. V. Welton, who, with the Pogue family, is attending the funeral which is being held at the late home on Downer Place today.
The Shepard family is one of the old Oswego families, where they lived immediately following their marriage, and where two of their children are buried. The remains will be cremated at Graceland today, and interred tomorrow at Oswego.
Mrs. Shepard was born in Indiana April 14, 1862, and besides her husband leaves one daughter, Miss Marjory.
HR 7/14/1910

Harriet Augusta Miller Ellwood 1910.07.14
Mrs. Isaac L. Ellwood, wife of Col. Ellwood, DeKalb County’s millionaire manufacturer, passed away at the handsome Ellwood home in DeKalb shortly after noon Saturday (July 16, 1910). She had many friends and acquaintances in this part of the county, and the prominence of the Ellwood name has made her almost a personal acquaintance of all DeKalb County residents. She had suffered for years with an aggravated form of stomach trouble, but the complications which developed with her last attack were so remote and mysterious to their nature that the physicians in charge could not locate. There was some obscure infection of internal nature which was beyond their best skill and every effort to discover and overcome it was in vain.
The late Mrs. Ellwood was born about seventy three years ago this month on the Miller farm in Kingston Township, where her parents—Mr. and Mrs. William H. Miller, pioneers of the county, lived for many years, the farm still remaining in possession of the Ellwood family. She was their only daughter and was christened Harriet Augusta, the only other child being William H. Miller, Jr., who has been for many years a citizen of DeKalb.
During her girlhood the family moved to DeKalb and it was at the family home on north Seventh Street that she was married to Isaac L. Ellwood in 1860.
The young couple established their home in DeKalb, where all their children were born, their residence there being continuous until they built the present home on First Street, about thirty years ago.
Six children were born to them, William L., widely known in business circles; Mrs. Harriet Mayo; the late Mrs. Mary Lewis; Oakley, who died years ago at the age of six; Mrs. Jessie Ray and Perry E., the well known DeKalb banker.
All the surviving children were with her at the time of her death to made as easy as might be, her last hours, and to support and comfort their stricken father in his time of trial
Personally the late Mrs. Ellwood was a woman of rare worth and striking individuality. She was educated at the Rockford Seminary and at St. Xaviers in Chicago. She was bright and keen, with a merry wit all her own that appealed irresistibly to those who knew its charm. HR 7/21/1910

Ida M. Holle Merkel 1910.07.15
Mrs. Christian W. Merkel died at her home on the farm known as the Henry Hardekopf farm south of Yorkville, Thursday afternoon, July 14, 1910. She has been in poor health for a number of years, tuberculosis having made its ravages on this young wife and mother.
Ida M. Holle was born in Kendall Township, January 11, 1880, the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. William Holle. She was one of seven children, of whom four sisters and one brother still live. Her mother died in January 1897, and her father, with a part of the family, has lived in Yorkville. She was married to Christian W. Merkel in January 1902, and two children, a son and daughter are living.
The funeral was held at the German Emanuel Lutheran Church Sunday, July 17, at 2 p.m., Rev. C. J. Lange having charge of the services. The ceremony was short but well given, Mr. Lange having a way of expressing the sympathy of the friends that shows how deep is the feeling. Interment was in the cemetery adjacent to the church. The choir, under the direction of George Reingardt, Jr., sang three appropriate hymns.
Present at the funeral were the sisters and brothers of Mrs. Merkel—Mrs. Fred Merkel, Mrs. A. C. Merkel, Mrs. Herbert Dhuse and Miss Dora Holle and William Holle, Jr. A number of relatives and friends from out of town were also present, among them being Henry Leifheit and family of Naperville; Mr. and Mrs. Henry Holle of Zearing, IA; Mr. and Mr. Fred Holle of State Center, IA; Mrs. Henry Merkel of St. Ansgar, IA; Mr. and Mrs. Adolph Leifheit, Mr. and Mrs. E. W. Granart, William Hotopp and Will Leifheit of Hinckley; Misses Lillie and Alma Hardekopf and Ed and Fred Hardekopf of Chicago.
HR 7/21/1910

James Boylin 1910.08.12
Saturday morning (August 6, 1910) James Boylin made his usual trip to the Waterman Creamery, and while visiting with Henry Bergholte, he was taken suddenly sick and died almost before medical aid could reach him. He was fifty seven years old and was admired for his kind heart. For eight years he has not been well. He was an only brother of Mrs. Will Duffy Funeral services were held Saturday from the Catholic Church in DeKalb. HR 8/11/1910

Steven Powers 1910.08.13
Steven, eight year old son of Mr. and Mrs. John Powers, suffered an attack of appendicitis Saturday. Dr. Wilkinson was summoned and relieved the intense pain. Sunday he sat up in bed; slept well until 3 a.m. Monday, when the severe pain returned. An operation was performed at Dr. Wilkinson’s Hospital, where the appendix was found to be broken and the internal organs infected. The funeral service will be conducted from the Catholic Church in DeKalb and burial will be in the same city HR 8/11/1910

Samuel Peterson 1910.08.14
Samuel Peterson was born in Norway November 27, 1858, and died at his home near Carlton, August 6, 1910, from consumption. In 1882 he came to Leland, working on a farm in that vicinity. He was united in marriage to Maria Hobbet, November 19, 1887, who with an adopted daughter, Miss Sena, survive him. He was one of eight children. Three sisters are living in Norway.
The funeral services occurred Monday at his late home, Rev. George Dunlap delivering the address. Mrs. Andrews and Miss McFarlane sang with Mrs. William McFarlane at the organ.
HR 8/11/1910

Isaac L. Ellwood 1910.09.04
Colonel Isaac L. Ellwood died a his home in DeKalb at 9:20 o’clock Sunday night (September 11, 1910) from a stroke of paralysis sustained nine weeks ago and superinduced by grief over the death of his wife. He was 77 years of age.
The end had been expected and all the members of his family were present. His physicians abandoned all hope Sunday night at 7 o’clock, when he lapsed into unconsciousness.
Colonel Ellwood’s death marks the close of one of the most extraordinary careers in the commercial history of the country. He was a man who rose from poverty and humble circumstances to wealth, great dignity in his community and political power because he was possessed of a genius of salesmanship from birth.
At a time when the middle west was famous for its auctioneers, Isaac Ellwood was the most successful of them all. It was said of him in his prime he could sell anything that the buyer could carry away.
It was at the time that Ellwood was at his best as a salesman that Joseph Glidden invented the barbed wire fence. Glidden couldn’t have sold $5 gold pieces. Ellwood could not have invented a toothpick, but the two got together, Glidden as the manufacturer and Ellwood as a salesman and the result was the cris-crossing of the continent with wire of that sort and the building up of a fortune estimated in the millions. It is said that in his lifetime the Ellwood factories turned out enough of the barbed wire to girdle the world fifty times.
Ellwood was something more than a mere salesman, however. He had constructive talent and his judgment in business matters was uncanny. It is said that everyone of his investments–and he made thousands of them–paid him dividends.
Not content with making barbed wire alone, he branched out as competition, entering the field, making new wires, devising new ways with which to widen the scope of his operations, keeping well up with the times and leaving in the distance all those who tried to keep up with him.
In 1876 Mr. Glidden sold his interest in the barbed wire business to the Washburn & Moen Manufacturing Company. A short time later the corporation became I. L. Ellwood & Co., with Colonel Ellwood managing partner and later sole owner of the great manufacturing establishments at DeKalb known as the I. L. Ellwood Manufacturing Company and the Ellwood Wire and Nail Company.
In 1898 the aggressions of the steel trust brought Ellwood into a clinch with J. Pierpont Morgan and John W. Gates, and when the dust of battle cleared away, the two financiers had a respect for Ellwood that they were first to admit.
Ellwood was intelligent enough, however, to see the advantages of a great corporation controlling the wire industry and the American Steel & Wire Company, giving Ellwood a great deal of stock and the management of the wire corporation, was formed. Colonel Ellwood severed his connection with the steel industry several years ago, though still retaining his securities.
Mr. Ellwood was born in Salt Springville, Montgomery County, NY. According to tradition his ancestry may be traced directly to Thomas Ellwood, a noted Quaker who was disinherited by his father, because of his religious beliefs. It was due to these religious beliefs that the Ellwoods originally came to the United States.
The colonel’s parents were of moderate means and offered him only such educational advantages as the public schools of Montgomery County afforded. His first real job–one that paid him a stated salary–was that of mule driver on the Erie Canal. For this work he received the salary of $10 per month. This, however, was before the high cost of living had become a national question.
When gold was discovered in California he promptly decided that that was the place for him. So, in 1851, he went west. It took him four long years to decide that he “had had enough”. and he returned to the middle west.
His first business venture was the hardware store which he opened in DeKalb. After the store got so that it could run itself, with the assistance of a couple of clerks, the young hardware man then entered the then paying profession of auctioneering. It is said that his reputation became so great that the business men and farmers within a radius of 150 miles of his store would send for him to handle their auctions for them.
Colonel Ellwood was active in Republican politics in DeKalb County, and had frequently been elected as state delegate to the national conventions. It was due to his efforts at Springfield that he secured for DeKalb, the Northern Illinois State Normal School. He was appointed a member of the Railroad and Warehouse Commission June 5, 1902, in which capacity he served for four years. He was a member of the honorary staff of former Governor Yates and it was by reason of that service that he acquired the title of colonel.
The funeral services were held on Tuesday afternoon at his late home and were private.
——————–
The funeral of the late Isaac L. Ellwood, DeKalb County’s millionaire barbed wire magnate, was attended by many from this vicinity who have co-labored with him in commercial and political circles. His power at one time was felt throughout DeKalb County. He was a man with great executive ability and at the same time, one disposed to be philanthropic in all his dealings with the people. The funeral was one of the largest ever held in DeKalb County, and he was laid to rest by the side of his estimable help-mate who passed away but a few months ago.
Col. Isaac Elwood, whose foresight in founding the industry built up his adopted city of DeKalb and created for himself one of the great fortunes of the west, died Sunday night (September 11, 1910) at his DeKalb residence.
Col. Ellwood only survived nine weeks, the wife to whom he was married fifty one years ago. Mrs. Ellwood died August 15, 1910 at the age of 74.
Col. Ellwood was 77 years old. Although apparently in vigorous health at the time, Mrs. Ellwood was seized by the illness which proved fatal to her and he was prostrated by her loss, and less than a week after her funeral he suffered a paralytic seizure from a blood clot in the spinal canal. His physicians gave no hope of his recovery from the first. He was unconscious during the last thirty six hours he was alive. He died at 9:19.
Two weeks ago, Col. Ellwood prepared his last will in which he disposed of his estate which now amounts to between five and six million. The will creates a temporary trust which will settle up the estate. It will be several years before the final distribution will be made. Col. Ellwood’s fortune was, during the heyday of his leadership in the steel industry, quoted at a figure several times larger than that named in his will. He had distributed large sums among his family since his retirement.
Col. Ellwood’s surviving sons and daughters were with him when he died. They are William L. Ellwood, E. Perry Ellwood, Mrs. Harriet Mayo, and Mrs. B. F. Ray. Mrs. E. Perry Ellwood and James Ellwood, a grandson, also were present. Mrs. William L. Ellwood and their two daughters, Miss Jean and Miss Elsie Ellwood, are in Europe. Edward F. Mayo and I. L. Ellwood, Jr., the year-old son of E. Perry Ellwood, make up the list of Col. Ellwood’s living descendants.
To Col. Ellwood is due the prosperity of DeKalb, known as “Barb City,” from the industry to which it owes its growth. In the reorganization of the steel company, Col. Ellwood insisted the fence mills remain in DeKalb. Chiefly to his efforts was due the location of the Northern Illinois State Normal School at DeKalb. Col. Ellwood has maintained his residence in DeKalb for fifty-five years. Instead of moving away from the city of his adoption as his fortune increased, he built larger and larger residences there. Today the row of mansions occupied by I. L. Ellwood and his sons on North First Street is the show place of the town. HR 9/15/1910

Achsa Hemenway 1910.09.12
The Rochelle Herald gives the following obituary of Miss Achsa Hemenway who was known and beloved by many people in this vicinity:
Achsa Hemenway, daughter of William E. and Cynthia Dewey Hemenway, was born near Hinckley, IL, January 31, 1872. In 1875 she moved with her parents to Alto Township, where she has since resided. For a number of years she was a faithful and efficient teacher in the public schools and won the esteem and love of those who came under her instruction. When the dread disease which took her life showed itself, she faced the condition heroically and during the summer made a strong fight for life, but in vain. She passed away September 30, 1910.
She was modest, retiring and reserved but beneath her reserve was a depth of feeling. She was a loving daughter and sister and devoted to her friends.
The funeral services were held in the Methodist Church at Steward on Monday afternoon conducted by Rev; F. W. Nazarene. The large attendance and the beautiful floral offering testified to the high esteem in which she was held.
Her father and mother, a sister, Mrs. Morris Cook; and a brother, L. D. Hemenway, survive her and fondly cherish her memory. Among the number of out-of-town people who attended the services were A. J. Hemenway, Miss Flora Hemenway, Mr. and Mrs. Edgar Foster, Mr. and Mrs. Neal McInnis and Mr. and Mrs. Fred Hengesbaugh of Hinckley; Mrs. Walter Foster, Plano; Mrs. Minnie Brown, Aurora; Mr. and Mrs. Fell, Thomasboro, IL. HR 10/5/1910

William Wilson Huff 1910.10.05
Saturday evening, October 1, 1910, while William Wilson Huff was preparing for the night’s rest, he passed peacefully and suddenly into that home where rest is eternal. He was born January 9, 1826, at Loborough, Ontario, Canada, and was married to Harriet Buck, of Battersea, Canada, June 8, 1859, and in 1864 they moved to Illinois, living the past two score years on the homestead where he died. To this union nine children were born, two dying in infancy and the remaining seven are Mrs. Luman Whitford, Mrs. Crelien Miller, Albert, Edwin and Orval, of this place; Mrs. Warren Gibbons, Steelville, MO; and William of Sandwich who, with his wife mourn his departure. Mr. Huff was strictly honest in every dealing. His funeral occurred Tuesday from the house, Rev. E. J. Aikin delivering the address. Misses Ethel Reynolds and Myrtle Keene with Frank and Jonas Sawyer sang, with Miss Edith Keene accompanying on the organ. Interment was at Johnson Grove Cemetery. The particularly sad feature of Mr. Huff’s passing is that they were partially moved into their home in town–which they bought of G. W. Lambing. –Waterman Leader.
—————–
Friends and relatives were shocked at the sudden death of Wilson Huff, which occurred at 7:30 p.m., October 1, 1910, while preparing for his night’s rest.
The past few years, being in failing health, he had retired from business and last spring rented the farm to his son while he and his wife were partially moved into their new home in Waterman. Saturday he was feeling in better health than usual, having had visitors and callers during the day. During the supper hour he was joking and visiting and at half past seven he retired. His wife called to him, and not receiving any answer, found, on going to his room, that he had passed away. He was always thoughtful of others, his greatest happiness being in making others happy. His life and character were such that the thought would be, he was prepared to go.
William Wilson Huff was born January 9, 1835 at Loborough, Ontario, Canada, and there, near the city of Kingston, grew to manhood. On June 9, 1859, he was married to Miss Harriet Back of Battersea Ontario. In 1864 they moved to Illinois , living the past forty years on the homestead where he died. To them nine children were born, two dying in infancy; the remaining left are Mrs. Luman Whitford, Mrs. Crenshaw, Albert, Edwin and Orval of Waterman, Mrs. Warren Gibbons of Steelville, MO, and William of Sandwich, who, with his wife, are left to mourn his departure.
The funeral was held Tuesday, October 4 at 1:30 o’clock at his home, Rev. E. J. Aiken delivering the address, assisted by Rev. George Dunlap. The large attendance and beautiful floral offerings testified to the high esteem in which he was held. Interment was at Johnson Grove Cemetery.
HR 10/13/1910

Charles Fox Mighells 1910.10.15
The remains of Charles Fox Mighells, son of James Lewis and Amanda Mighells, arrived here Sunday on the limited express, accompanied by his sister, Mrs. E. P. Taylor and family. Monday morning, October 3, 1910, while resuming his usual days work at the Rosedale Gold Mine in New Mexico, he accidentally met his death. For two years his health has been impaired by heart disease and supposition prevails that he suffered an attack and fell down the shaft, where his lifeless body was found six hours later.
While a young man he taught school in this vicinity, then embarked in the grain business managing an elevator at Lake City, IA. During the past twenty years he has been mining in the south and west.
He was born at the homestead in 1852, and if he had lived until January 17, 1911, he would have reached his 59th birthday. Interment was at Clinton Cemetery, Rev. George Dunlap officiating.
The brothers and sisters left to mourn his loss are Nathan Mighells, Mary J. Wakefield of Waterman; Thaddeus S. of Holstein, Montraville P. of Storm Lake, Lewis of Lake City and Minnie Taylor of Chicago. By his passing away the first link has been broken in this pioneer family. HR 10/13/1910

Cordelia A Robinson 1910.10.16
Miss Cordelia A. Robinson was born November 29, 1825, at Hume, Allegheny County, NY, and died October 9, 1910 at the home of her sister, Mrs. Isaac Potter, where she has lived since 1867. Early in life she affiliated with the Baptist Church. The funeral occurred Tuesday afternoon from the late home, Rev. George Dunlap delivering the address. Mesdames Humphry Roberts, and F. A. Brown sang. Interment was at Clinton Cemetery. Two sisters remain to mourn; Mrs. Spencer of Wyoming County, NY, and Mrs. Potter, who gave every part of her home for her use. Those attending from away were Mr. and Mrs. Lewis Paul of Aurora, Mrs. Hattie Rollins and Miss Lizzie Potter of DeKalb.
To the friends who assisted us during my sister’s sickness and death, to those who gave flowers, to those who sang, and to all who spoke words of comfort, we extend sincere thanks.
Mrs. Isaac Potter and family HR 10/13/1910

Minnie Papenberg Southoff 1910.10.17
Mrs. Minnie Papenberg Southoff, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Henry Papenberg, passed away at her home in DeKalb at the age of 25 years and 6 months, and the funeral was held from the Squaw Grove Lutheran Church Friday (October 11, 1910). Rev Parge of Sycamore preached in German and Rev. F. Kroeger preached in English. Interment was in the Lutheran Cemetery. The pall bearers were Eli Boekenhauer, Martin Rissman, William Weilert, William A. Leifheit, Charles Leifheit and Ernest Baie.
Besides her husband, Robert Southoff, deceased leaves an infant daughter, father, seven brothers and one sister.
HR 10/27/1910

Deletta R. Crandall Coy 1910.10.18
Deletta R. Crandall was born December 2, 1850, in the village of Smithville, NY, where her girlhood was spent, and died October 15, 1910, at Odebolt, IA, after lying hopelessly ill many weeks, which illness became acute a few days prior to her passing. July 29, 1852 she was united in marriage to Bela Addison Coy, who’s death occurred January 30, 1910. They made their first start westward in 1855 and located near Kaneville, moving to Waterman in 1875 where they lived for nine years, leaving in 1884 for Odebolt, where she has been an esteemed neighbor and friend ever since. Three sons, John F., Charles C., and Ned, with four brothers and sisters, thirteen grandchildren and six great grandchildren mourn her departure. Deceased was an aunt of Mrs. Charles Tompkins of this place, who with many friends mourn her passing. HR 11/10/1910

George McEachron 1910.11.04
George McEachron, a prominent farmer of Clinton Township, living three and one half miles southwest of Waterman, passed away suddenly on Tuesday afternoon (November 1, 1910) shortly after eating his dinner with his family.
Mr. McEachron had been to Waterman in the forenoon. For several weeks he had been noticing sharp pains across his chest, but there was no suspicion that it was anything of a serious nature. While in Waterman he visited with his many friends and acquaintances on the street and called at Dr. Wilkinson’s Hospital to explain his slight trouble and to secure something for his relief. He and the doctor had a long talk together and he left the hospital in his pleasant usual mood. He returned home at once with his team.
At the dinner table it is reported he was unusually bright and cheerful, but soon after eating he left the table and retired to a sleeping room to take a little rest before resuming his work about the farm. In a brief instant he had answered the final summons–going peacefully and quietly into that great beyond.
The funeral was held from his late home Thursday afternoon, beginning at two o’clock, with Pastor John Acheson, of the United Presbyterian Church in charge. Interment was in Oak Mound Cemetery.
Mr. McEachron was sixty two years old. He was born in Washington County, NY, and came to Illinois when a small boy and settled on what is now the old homestead farm, where the deceased passed away.
The pall bearers were his nephews Verne and Ross Graham, of Waterman, Walter Graham, of Sugar Grove, Tom Graham, of Waterman, Frank Johnson, of Waterman, and Duncan McDougal, of Aurora. The music was rendered by a mixed quartet consisting of Jean and Mary Howison, Ralph Howison and Bryce Ferguson. The deceased is mourned by his wife and an adopted son, Reed McEachron. HR 10/27/1910

William Edward Ward 1910.11.15
Relatives and friends in Hinckley were shocked to hear of the accident and death of William E. Ward, popularly known here as Ed Ward, at Miller, SD, death being the result of a broken neck, which was caused by a hay rack overturning and falling on him. –Sandwich Argus November 18, 1910.
——————
Relatives and friends in Hinckley were shocked to hear of the accident and death of William Edward Ward, popularly known here as Ed Ward,, at Miller, SD, death being the result of a broken neck, which was caused by a hay rack overturning and falling on him. In speaking of the death the Beacon says:
“William Edward Ward, thirty two years old, graduate of the West Aurora Schools and for several years employed in the Burlington general offices in Chicago, was killed at Miller, SD, when a hay rack which he was unloading fell on top of him. He was a son of W. H. Ward, well known Burlington Conductor, and resided in Aurora until about two years ago.
The accident comes as a shock to his parents. They had been visiting with him at Miller and had been at home but a few hours when they received a telegram telling of his death. They left at once for Miller.
After leaving the general offices of the Burlington in Chicago he embarked in the hotel business in Forreston. Farm life appealed to him and his father established him on a farm at Miller. He leaves a wife and two children.”
The body was shipped here yesterday morning and the funeral was held from the Methodist Church at one o’clock, Rev. W. W. Diehl preaching a splendid sermon. Interment was in Greenwood Cemetery.
Among those present from out of town were many relatives, including the grieved father and mother of deceased, Mr. and Mrs. Robert Baker and Mrs. Sadie Scott of Rochester, NE, Mr. and Mrs. Edward Blakely of Chicago. There were also ten relatives and friends from Forreston. Miss Lutie Van Aeistyn presided at the piano, and Mrs. Coster and Mrs. Canfield sang. Many friends here extend their sincere sympathy to the sorrowing widow and two children and the parents.
The bearers were John Schmidt, A. J. Coster, Oscar Fay, James Clark, E. E. Keith and Arthur Wiebke. HR 11/17/1911

Adam Haish 1910.11.17
Concerning the death of the late Adam Haish of DeKalb, the Chronicle says:
Adam Haish Was Born in Bonddish, Germany August 12, 1830, and when he was about two years of age, came with his parents to the United States. They located in Pennsylvania where Mr. Haish’s mother passed away and later the family resided on a farm in Crawford County, OH. In 1850 the family moved to DeKalb County, settling on a farm in Pierce Township. Mr. Haish remained on the home farm until 1856. He was successful in his work and only a few years ago retired to move to DeKalb to the home on North Second Street.
Mr. Haish’s death is mourned by a faithful wife and four children, Will of Hinckley; Jacob of Pierce; Mrs. Lucy Ann Leish of Troxel and Henry of Pierce.
Funeral services were held at 11:30 a.m. at the home Thursday (November 11, 1910), conducted by Dr. A. T. Horn and the remains were taken to Pierce where services were held in the afternoon at the Evangelical Church, Rev. Messner, a former pastor officiated.
HR 11/17/1910

Christian Erhart 1910.11.18
One of Pierce Township’s oldest and best known pioneers, Mr. Christian Erhart, was suddenly called by death last Thursday night (November 3, 1910) after but a day’s illness, following two years of health which surpassed anything he had enjoyed for a long time. Another of the founders of this county has gone. Another one of the grand old men, who as father, friend and neighbor held the esteem of all his acquaintances.
Mr. Erhart was born in Germany–the birth place of so many of our rugged pioneers. June 20, 1821 he first saw the light of day, and in 1843 he was married to Miss Marie Nesslie in their home town–Stuttgart, Wurtenberg, Germany. They sailed for the land of promise—the land of opportunity—the land of freedom, where they could start for themselves and enjoy the results of their accumulations. The first three years of their life in America were spent at Rome, NY, and then they moved to the farm in Pierce Township where Mr. Erhart passed away. They lived on the farm about fifty five years.
The children who survive him are Mrs. Caroline Klein, mother of The Review foreman, in Hinckley; George and Henry Erhart of Aurora, and Mary Erhart of Pierce. The grandchildren are Mrs. W. R. Haish, Mrs. Ida Harbour, Mrs. C. M. Dyer, Miss Carrie Klein, Theodore Klein and Frank Klein. Three great grandchildren also survive—Miss Vernie Haish and Theodore Haish of Hinckley and Alice Culp of Aurora.
Sunday the funeral was held from the late home and from the Pierce German Evangelical, Church of which Rev. Mr. Swingel is pastor. He preached a splendid sermon. Mr. Erhart has been a member of this denomination since he was a boy of fourteen years, and has remained faithful all these years. He was buried in the East Pierce Cemetery beside his wife who passed away about three years ago. The pall bearers were Thomas Gallagher, Michael Organ, William Schule, August Kaus, George Reimsnider and Albert Klotz. Among the immediate relatives attending were Mr. and Mrs. Henry Erhart, Mr. and Mrs. George Erhart, Mahlon Culp and daughter Alice, of Aurora; Mrs. Caroline Klein of Hinckley; Mr. and Mrs. Charles Dyer and Mrs. Ida Harbour of LaGrange; Miss Carrie Klein of Aurora; William Haish, Miss Vernie Haish, Theodore Haish, Theodore and Frank Klein of Hinckley, besides a host of friends from the surrounding towns and cities. HR 11/10/1910

Fred C. Dhuse 1910.11.19
Many friends from this vicinity drove across country Sunday to attend the funeral of Fred C. Dhuse, who died in the St. Charles Hospital at Aurora Friday morning (November 25, 1910) after a lingering illness.
Among those who went from here were:
Mr. and Mrs. Dolph Leifheit and Will; H. H. Leifheit, Mr. and Mrs. Charles Leifheit, George Hage of Hinckley, Mr. and Mrs. Dolph Schultz, Mr. and Mrs. August Leifheit, Mr. and Mrs. Louis Graneirt, Mr. and Mrs. Herman Von Ohlen of Waterman.
Mr. Dhuse was about fifty one years of age and leaves a widow and two daughters to mourn his loss. The funeral was held from the German Lutheran Cross Church, Pastor John Rabe taking charge of the services. HR 12/1/1910

Baby Woods 1910.12.02
One of the saddest deaths in this vicinity the past year is the passing away of the little five weeks old baby of Mr. and Mrs. George Woods, the mother of the babe being a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Ed Stahl.
The baby had slept during the night by the side of its mother, comfortable couched on a folded blanket, raising it on a soft little bed above the parents. In the morning, Monday, (December 5, 1910), when the parents arose, the babe was apparently sleeping and was not disturbed, until several hours later, when the sad state of death became apparent. Dr. Owings was called but life had been extinct long before he was summoned.
Coroner Morris, of Kirkland, was called Monday and in the evening he arrived with Dr. Owings, of Hinckley to pass on the tragic death. It is the belief of the coroner and the physician that the baby died in a spasm, as it was noticeably frothed about the mouth when first discovered.
The parents have the sincere sympathy of a wide circle of friends. HR 12/8/1910

Christian Leifheit 1910.12.03
Mr. Christian Leifheit died at his home Thursday morning (December 6, 1910) of heart failure at the age of 75 years. The funeral services were held on Friday at the Hartman Church.
———————
In the passing away of Christian Leifheit at his humble but happy home in Hinckley, Tuesday morning (November 29, 1910), another one of this vicinity’s venerable and useful German-American citizens has answered the final summons. Of Christian Leifheit it may be said that he sacrificed the best years of his life to the hard work of section labor on the railroad. For many years after coming to Hinckley he plodded the section in all kinds of weather, in his rugged manhood sustaining the cold of winter and the stifling heat of midsummer with little thought of the ruinous effects it would have on his constitution in later years. He was a faithful employee, a conscientious, good-hearted German laborer and the weekly trips about town with his sorrowing widow will be missed by the residents here who have known them for so many years.
Christian Leifheit was born in Hanover, Germany; he was married in the old country, and with his wife came to America soon after. He first settled in Kendall County, where he worked several years for the late John Dunn, at one time supervisor of Kendall Township. Then he came to Hinckley and worked in the tile factory several years before taking up his railroad work. He leaves a widow, one son, Louis of Hinckley, and a daughter, Mrs. William Meyers of Oneal, NE, who is here with her husband. His brother, August Leifheit of Kansas, is unable to attend the funeral. Four sisters—Mrs. Christ Dieders, Mrs. Gus Monkemeier, Mrs. Christ Kahle and Mrs. George Reingardt, all of Yorkville, also survive him. Mr. Leifheit also has another brother, Henry, in Germany.
The funeral will be held from the house at twelve o’clock, noon, tomorrow, Friday, thence from the Squaw Grove German Lutheran Church, where he will be interred in the cemetery.
HR 12/1/1910
——————
The funeral of Christ Leifheit, Hinckley’s oldest section workman, was held from the home Friday noon, and thence from the Squaw Grove German Lutheran church, Pastor Kroeger having charge of the services. Many relatives were here from a distance, and many of the townspeople turned out to honor him who worked here so many years.
Among those here from out of town were: Mrs. August Monkemeier, Misses Lily and Lena Monkemeier, Mrs. Mary Nolta, Will and Fred Monkemeier, Chris Kahle, George Kahle, Misses Minnie and Caroline Kahle, Mrs. Chris Deiders, Mrs. Lena Hanson, Henry Borneman, of Yorkville, Mr. and Mrs. William Meyers of Oneal, NE.
The pall bearers were William Hartman, William Wielert, August Borchers, Mr. Seyfrit, William Leifheit of Hinckley, and Charles Boekenhauer of Waterman.
The services at the church were made doubly consoling by the splendid music furnished by the school children under the direction of Prof. C;. H. Heine. HR 12/8/1910

Joshua Rhodes 1910.12.11
The death of Joshua Rhodes, that occurred Monday morning (December 19, 1910) at eleven o’clock, at Aurora, comes as a shock to his friends and acquaintances. Mr. Rhodes had been ill for the past several days with an attack of la grippe, but for the past twenty four hours his condition had been alarming, and although not unexpected by the members of the family, news of his death will be received by his acquaintances in Hinckley and Sandwich. Mr. Rhodes was well known in Sandwich, for during his residence in Hinckley, he made frequent tips to this city and always attended the meeting of the stockholders of the Northern Illinois telephone Company, in which he was a heavy investor.
Joshua Rhodes was born in Massachusetts in 1837 and came west settling in Big Rock when a young man. In the early days, Mr. Rhodes served in the capacity of postmaster in Big Rock, which position he held for years. He accumulated a comfortable fortune and at the time of his death owned a couple of large farms in Big Rock Township.
Several years go Mr. and Mrs. Rhodes moved to California and upon their return to Aurora nine years ago he built their present home where they have since lived.
Mr. Rhodes was identified with the First Methodist Church and was one of its most active workers. He leaves a widow, who was Miss Adelaide Severance, an adopted daughter, Miss Martha Rhodes, twelve years old, three sisters, and one brother, Mrs. Aggie Harris, Mrs. Anna Milgate, Miss Alice Rhodes, John F. Rhodes and Mrs. John Meredith, all of Aurora.
———————-
Many Hinckley friends were grieved to hear of the death of Joshua Rhodes at his home in Aurora Monday morning (December 19, 1910). Deceased was at one time a prominent resident of Big Rock, where he was postmaster and conducted a store. Later he lived in Hinckley, and here he was an active worker in the Methodist Church. He spent some time in California, then returned to Aurora. Mr. Rhodes was a brother-in-law of Mrs. William Von Ohlen of Hinckley and had often visited here since his removal to Aurora. HR 1/12/1911

Edward Weber 1910.12.20
Accompanied by an escort of fifty Masonic Brothers, the last mortal remains of Edward Weber, son of Mr. F. Weber, were borne to Greenwood Cemetery Monday afternoon, where the cortège rested to deposit the lambskin and acacia in the silent tomb according the ceremonial rites of the profession. It was a sad hour in this village. A popular member of the rising generation had been called. A useful life had been severed by the scythe of time and gathered to the land where his fathers had gone before him.
Edward Weber was born in Sandwich June 19, 1875. Moving with his father’s family early in life to the farm in Squaw Grove, he has since made that his home. He has been in business in Hinckley with his brothers Robert and Otto, as well as serving many years as a painter and decorator. His illness, pernicious anemia, which developed into cirrhosis of the liver, has extended over a period of two years, during which time he has had the assistance of the best specialists in the country, in a vain endeavor to restore his health. During all this time he maintained that quiet modesty the uncomplaining cheerfulness which have been the great virtues of his life. He endeared himself to all with whom he came in contact, and on every hand a deep feeling of esteem is felt for the young man who was called so early in life. He passed away Saturday morning (December 10, 1910), about 5:30 o’clock.
The funeral was held from the home Monday afternoon, the remains being escorted to the Methodist Church in Hinckley by a guard of Masonic Brothers in funeral regalia—Abe Hemenway, A. R. Dewey, Dr. A. B. Simpkins, Harry Walker, Clarence L. Hastie and R. D. Chappell. At the Masonic Hall the cortege was joined by the Hinckley chapter of the Eastern Star.
Rev. W. M. Ewing of Plainfield, former pastor of the Hinckley Methodist Church, was here to take charge of the services, and he was assisted by Pastor Diehl. Mr. Ewing preached a splendid sermon, drawing a potent lesson from the passing away of this popular young man. Mrs. Coster and Mrs. Fry, accompanied by Miss Lutie Van Aelstyn, sang several beautiful hymns, and their splendid efforts must surely assist in assuaging the deep sorrow of the family. The church was filled with friends and acquaintances of the deceased, and although it was a cold, winter day, many followed the remains to the cemetery.
Right Worshipful Brother James McCreedie of Aurora, was here to take charge of the burial rites at the grave, and his impressive manner in delivering the beautiful service won for him many friends.
Those who mourn his loss are his father, Mr. F. Weber, and six brothers and four sisters—Matilda, Elizabeth, Bertha of Chicago; Minnie, who is at home; William of Chicago, Otto, Ferdinand and Herman of Hinckley, Henry of Sandwich and Robert of Seattle, WA. All were present at the funeral with the exception of Robert, who was unable to get here. The mother died ten years ago the twenty eighth of this month.
The exuberance of the floral offerings was a mute testimonial to the large circle of friends held by Ed Weber during his life. The big gathering at the church further accentuated the loss this community feels in his passing away, and the silent tread of many feet which have traveled the same journey as his through the mysteries of the east, bore witness that a brother in the best sense of the word had been called to a reward by the great artificer of the universe. HR 12/15/1911

Andrew Hempfling 1910.12.21
Another one of the older German settlers was called Friday, December 15, 1910, when Mr. Andrew Hempfling passed away at the home of his son, George Hempfling, in Hinckley. He was born in Germany June 27, 1834; was married at his old home in Bavaria, and came to America in 1881 settling at once in Squaw Grove Township, living for two years on the old Leifheit homestead. Shortly after that he bought the small farm, where he resided up to two years ago, when he came to Hinckley to make his home with his son, where he passed away. Mrs. Hempfling preceded her husband seven years ago.
Rev. Mr. Rathmann, former pastor of the German Churches in Hinckley and Pierce, came to Hinckley Monday morning to take charge of the funeral services. The bearers were Conrad Wilkening, Fred Wedkemper, Henry Weddige, W. H. Menk, August Reimsnider and William Baie. Deceased is mourned by his son George Hempfling of Hinckley. HR 1/12/1911

Mrs. George W. Lee 1910.12.22
The funeral of Mrs. Lee at the Methodist Church, Tuesday afternoon, was a gathering of sorrowing friends and relatives whose presence attested the grief that is felt in her death. For many years Mrs. Lee was an active, working Christian woman, the Methodist Church and her home being her heart’s world. Pastor Diehl had charge of the services. Her life will long be a pleasant memory in the minds of her friends, as they realize that Mrs. Lee will be one of those called to the higher reward.
Mrs. George W. Lee was born in New Hartford, NY, November 10, 1833 and died in Hinckley, IL, December 17, 1910.
In 1843 she came west with her parents and settled in Squaw Grove Township. Here she spent, with the exception of a few years, the major part of her long life.
January 1, 1856 she was married to George W. Lee; to this union one child was born, Mrs. William Cheney of Hinckley.
In 1879, under the pastorate of N. M. Stokes, she joined the Methodist Episcopal Church, remaining a consistent member up to the time of her death.
She leaves to mourn her loss, her husband, George W. Lee; one sister, Mrs. Elizabeth Eastabrooks; one daughter, Mrs. William Cheney and three grandchildren, Bert, Grace and Paul Cheney. Interment was in the Miller Cemetery. HR 1/12/1911

William Henry Keene 1911.01.08
William Henry Keene was born in the village of Esperance, Shoharrie County, NY, on March 4, 1820. He died at his home in Victor Township, DeKalb County, IL, on January 9, 1911, at the age of 90 years, 10 months and 5 days.
In 1844 he came to the state of Illinois, bringing with him his father, step-mother, a brother and a sister, and a grandmother, ninety years of age.
He first settled on a rented farm, on the Fox River, at North Aurora, where he lived until the spring of 1849.
At that time he moved to Victor Township, having purchased 40 acres of the farm on which he resided until his death, almost 61 years.
In 1848 he was united in marriage to Emily Pulver, of Plattville, Kendall County, this state, who passed away in June 1897. To them were born eight children, four sons and four daughters. Two sons, Marcus and Lewis died in infancy. The eldest daughter, Mrs. Julia Brewer, died in Kansas in 1888. George M., the oldest son, died in October 1905. One son and three daughters survive. They are Louis Adelbert, living on the home farm; Miss Mattie Keene, with whom he lived, and who cared for him during the latter years of his life; Mrs. Nancy M. Davis, living an a farm adjoining the home farm, and Mrs. Laura B. Clifford of Leland. All were with him in his last brief illness.
Besides these there survived him, 20 grandchildren and 10 great grandchildren.
The funeral was held on Thursday at 11 o’clock. Rev. E. J. Aiken, of Waterman had charge of the funeral services, with Mr. Heeg, the efficient undertaker, of Waterman, in charge of the burial. Choice selections of music were rendered by Miss Mabel Hipple, and Mrs. Fred Brown, of Waterman. The remains were laid to rest in the family lot in Wesson Cemetery.
Sketch of W. H. Keene from Sandwich Argus January 1, 1880
It is difficult for the young to see that they must lay the foundations of future fortunes in industrious, frugal habits in early life. As we look into the lives of those who stand as our successful men, and review their early struggles against poverty and hardships, to get a “start in life,” all are impressed with the belief that poverty is not an unmitigated evil, for most to of the wealthy men of the great west got their foothold in early privations where they learned the value of money, and the necessity of economy. Mr. Keene is no exception to this rule. Born in the village of Esperance, Schohare County, NY in the year 1820, his father a toll gate keeper on the Cherry Valley Turnpike for over 18 years, but who had purchased a small farm under one of the old patent leases of that day, but found himself after years of struggle, by the death of the owner of the lease, unable to perfect his title without paying over the whole amount, and deciding that it would be easier to make a home, through the offer of A. C. Gibson, of Schnectady, to take charge of a farm he owned on the Fox River, in Illinois, between Batavia and Aurora, and hence removing with his whole family in 1844, the family consisting of the parents, a grandmother 90 years old, two sons and one daughter.
Upon this decision, the father and mother started from Esperance in a covered wagon, with a set of bob sleighs hanging between the axles and crossed into Canada, driving west through that province–through he state of Michigan, part of Indiana, and up into the state of Illinois, starting with $100, traveling 7 weeks, and arriving at their destination with $3. On this journey they started with two horses, one 18 and the other 20 years old, both arriving in good condition, and one of them working on the farm for several years after.
This son, upon whom the burden of the family had fallen, spent the winter working for his instruction (boarding himself) in shoemaking, and the next spring he started on this journey westward with the balance of the family, by lake and canal, and when all had gathered at their new home in the west they had, all told, $15 left, $5 of which was paid for some pigs, $5 for a cow and $5 for a plow, this being only half of the cost. Here the grandmother and one brother died.
Here Mr. Keene worked on the farm by day and worked at his trade nights, until he got quite a start, sufficient to warrant the purchase of 46 acres of land, for which he traded cattle and $500 in cash. Onto this he moved in 1850, his father dying the same summer, aged 67 years. About the same time he claimed 160 acres. Struggling along in this way, each year gaining a little until he has now 280 acres of valuable land, for some parts of which he paid $18 per acre. To build on this farm he hauled logs to Snyder’s Mill, paying for the sawing in shoemaking, at which he frequently worked until midnight.
In 1848 Mr. Keene married Miss Emaline Pulver, of Kendall County, and as the fruits of this union they have six living children; the oldest is Mrs. A. L Brewer, how living in Ottawa, KS. Mr. Keene pays especial attention to fine stock, especially Durham cattle, Poland China hogs and Lester sheep. He aims to feed on the farm all raised on it, and by so doing keeps his land in first class condition. Mr. Keene is one of the best of our successful farmers, a fair specimen of the thrifty men who have made the state of Illinois to be the third state of the Union.
——————–
William H. Keene died at his home in Victor Township Mondah, January 9, 1911, being ten months and five days over ninety years. He was born in Esperance, NY, March 4, 1820 and came to Illinois in 1844 with his parents and a grandmother, who at that time was over 90 years of age.
The funeral is being held from the late home today, Thursday. Obituary next week. HR 1/12/1911
——————-
William Henry Keene was born in the village of Esperance, Schoharie County, NY, March 4, 1820. He died at his home in Victor Township, DeKalb County, January 9, 1911, at ninety years, ten months and five days.
In 1844 he came to Illinois, bringing with him, father, stepmother, a brother, a sister, and a grandmother who was ninety years of age. He first settled on a rented farm on the fox River at North Aurora where he lived until 1849, when he purchased 40 acres of the farm on which he lived ever since. In 1848 he was married to Emily Pulver, of Plattville, Kendall County, IL. To them were born eight children—four sons and four daughters. Left to mourn his loss are three daughters and one son, Miss Mattie Keene, who has cared for her father for a number of years; Mrs. Nancy M. Davis, living on a farm adjoining the old home; L. A. Keene, living on the home farm, and Mrs. Laura B. Clifford of Leland; All were present during his last illness. Besides these there remain twenty grandchildren.
Coming to this country at such an early date, to him was given the privilege of witnessing the wonderful transformation of the almost uninhabited prairies of northern Illinois into one of the most prosperous sections of any country.
On Sunday morning, the 8th, he seemed in his usual health, eating a hearty meal and walking over to his son’s house to see his little baby granddaughter, of whom he was particularly fond. Returning to the house he sat in his chair while his daughter prepared the noonday meal. Failing to get a response when the meal was ready, she went to him and found him apparently in a stupor from which she failed to arouse him. Dr. Greeley of Waterman was summoned, and he pronounced it a slight stroke of paralysis. Mrs. Keene remained in a semi-conscious condition until about nine o’clock Monday evening, when he passed peacefully away.
The funeral was held at his old home on Thursday the 12th, at 11 a.m., Rev., E. J. Aiken of Waterman officiating.
Selections were rendered by Miss Mable Hipple and Mrs. Fred Brown of Waterman.
Those from a distance attending the funeral were: Mrs. Mary Shearer, a granddaughter, and her husband from Lane, KS; Harry Brewer, a grandson, from Aurora; Mrs. Lothera Lundberg, a niece from Joliet. Many friends and old acquaintances from Waterman, Leland and Sandwich were also in attendance.
Entitled to special mention, perhaps, was the presence of Mr. Post of Shabbona, a friend and acquaintance of more than fifty years, himself eighty five years of age. HR 1/19/1911

Eunice Apthorp Hubbard 1911.01.22
When death summoned Mrs. C.A. Hubbard last Friday, January 13, 1911, a spirit of grief seemed to permeate this entire vicinity. One of the oldest residents—one of the best of women—one of the greatest church workers in the community—wife of a faithful supervisor—mother of a splendid family–had been called to her reward which has surely been richly earned.
A few excerpts from the obituary data as read at the funeral Monday will convey to the outside world the noble characteristics possessed by Mrs. Hubbard, and serves to freshen in the minds of her acquaintances in this county the splendid attributes for which she was noted through life.
Eunice Apthorp was born in Hinsdale, MA, June 4, 1830, and died in Hinckley, IL, January 13, 1911. She was married to Charles A. Hubbard of Pittsfield, MA, May 1, 1850.
In October 1852, she came with her husband to DeKalb County and located in Pierce Township. Later they moved to Cortland, an thence to Aurora for the purpose of giving their children better educational advantages. In the fall of 1884 they came to Hinckley where they have since made their home. Her husband died February 28, 1909. This brought to a close a most happy married life, which covered a period of nearly sixty years.
Her activities in the church covered nearly all phases of Christian service. For years she was a most conscientious and efficient Sunday School teacher. In the Ladies Aid Society, she was ever an able and faithful worker. For twenty five years she was the devoted and inspiring secretary of the W.F.M.S.
For a period of forty years through rain or sunshine, she was a faithful attendant upon the regular services of the church. Then when broken health prevented her meeting in the house of God for worship, she established in her own home at the regular hour for church service, her own church service.
Six children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Hubbard—Albert, James, George, Elmer, Marietta, and Charles. All are living except Charles, who died at the age of fourteen years.
The funeral was held from the Methodist Church Monday, Rev. L. B. Lott being called from Earlville to participate with Pastor Diehl in the services. Mrs. Frye and Mrs. Graves sang, and Mrs. Kennedy presided at the piano. The bearers were all church men—M. H. Beitel, Hoyt Wilcox, David Hobbs, E. P Gardiner, Jerry Seyfrit and William Cheney. HR 1/19/1911

Mary E. Hinsdale Ainsworth 1911.02.16
Mrs. Mary E. Ainsworth, 71, a native of Massachusetts and resident of Pasadena for eighteen years, died yesterday (February 22, 1911) at her home, 589 North Lake avenue. Funeral services will be held at two o’clock Friday, from the residence, burial following in Mountain View Cemetery.
The above is taken from one of the California papers. Deceased was Miss Mary E. Hinsdale when she was a Squaw Grove girl, and after her marriage to Ainsworth, moved to Sandwich. She leaves many old friends and acquaintances in Hinckley. HR 2/23/1911

Lena VonOhlen Boller 1911.02.17
Lena VonOhlen was born in Wenser, Brunswick, Germany, October 23, 1849. She came to America at six years of age, living with her parents in Victor Township, DeKalb County, IL.
She married Anton Boller January 30, 1873, living with him in Clinton Township until his death, November 2, 1883. Since then Hinckley has been her home.
She had been complaining of a cold for several weeks, which later developed into pneumonia. She died February 22, 1911 at 6:30 p.m., at the age of 61 years, 3 months and 29 days.
She leaves to mourn her loss one daughter, Ida Amelia Boller, and one son Arvie Frederick Boller. She also leaves two sisters, Mrs. C. H. Baie and Mrs. Johanna Thorel of Hinckley, and three brothers, Christian VonOhlen of Leland, Henry VonOhlen of Somonauk, and William VonOhlen of Hinckley.
She united with the church at the age of 14 years and was a member of this parish for 25 years.
The funeral was held at St. Paul’s Evangelical Church, Saturday, at 12:30, conducted by Rev. J. A. Hoefer. Music was furnished by Miss Hilda Morsch and Miss Stella Wedkemper, with Mrs. Mollie Clark at the organ. The bearers were Fred Wedkemper, B. F. Walther, Dudley Loptien, W. H. Menk, Henry Weddige and Conrad Wilkening.
She was laid to rest in the North Clinton Cemetery, near Waterman.
The out of town relatives and friends were Mrs. Alvina VonOhlen, Mrs. Ida Oleson, Emil VonOhlen, Edward VonOhlen, Anna VonOhlen, Ernest VonOhlen and Julia VonOhlen of Leland; Mrs. Alvina Arnold of Sandwich; Mrs. Alice VonOhlen of Somonauk; Mrs. C. N. Hoffman of Aurora, Mrs. Frank Irving of Plano, Mrs. A. R. Wolenweber and Mr. and Mrs. Frank Challand of Waterman. HR 3/2/1911

W. H. Tibbles 1911.02.18
The life of W. H. Tibbles, which has been hanging by a thread for the past month and has been so carefully guarded by loving hands and faithfully watched by relatives and friends, took its flight to portals beyond the sky Sunday morning (February 25, 1911) at 10:30.
Probably there is not a person residing in our city who was not acquainted with this grand old man and all honored and respected him and his taking away leaves a void in their hearts for one they held dear.
Rev. William Harvey Tibbles, A. M. has spent a along and active life in preaching the gospel of Jesus Christ. At the age of sixteen he joined the Methodist Episcopal Church, but was large enough to rejoice in the prosperity of all Christian institution’s. He was born in Athena County, OH, May 28, 1829. His parents, with their nine children, moved to Illinois in 1841. Mr. Tibbles yielded to the gold fever of ’49 and went west seeking his fortune. That venture proving unsuccessful, and providential that it did, he returned to Ohio with only fifty cents in his pocket, entered the Ohio Wesleyan University, from which he graduated in 1855.
He then joined the Pittsburgh Conference. In the spring of 1862 he was selected Captain of Co. L, 14th Pennsylvania Cavalry. After eight months service he resigned to accept the commission of Colonel of the 2nd Ohio Infantry. Six months later, at the expiration of his term of service, he began recruiting men for the war and leading them to the front.
He was a member of the Rochelle Post G. A. R. and took an active part in keeping up the interests in the organization. He has filled nearly every office in the post during his membership and the order has lost a most valuable member. His old army comrades attended the funeral in a body and performed their last sad rites of their order at the grave.
In the Pittsburgh Conference he served the following charges: Paris, New Somerset, Richmond, Enon Valley, Freedom, Worthington, Butler and Millerstown; In 1876 he transferred to the Rock River Conference and was pastor of the following appointments: 1867 Prairie Center; 1869 Mt. Carroll; 1871 Lanark; 1873-1877 presiding elder of the Freeport District; 1877 Plano; 1879 Steward; 1882 Paw Paw; 1885 Steward Circuit; 1890 Kings; 1892 Hinckley. Soon after finishing his labors at Hinckley, he moved to Rochelle with his family where he has since lived. In 1895 he retired from the regular duties and responsibilities of the effective ministry.
During all these years he kept every ministerial appointment. His mind was active to the end, but body vigorous, and his spirit kind but firm. Up to within the last few weeks, he attended regularly all the church gatherings. So pleased were the members of the local Methodist church over his successful pulpit work of last summer that he had been invited to look after the same work again next season during the absence of the pastor.
Through good business managementm he acquired some valuable farm property both in this state and Missouri, and with his other savings he was in comfortable circumstances and free from financial trials during the latter years of his life. He refused to accept a compensation from the Conference, although entitled to one.
As to his home life, which is such an important feature of every minister’s career, he married, March 24, 1857, Ruth E. Hall of Richmond, OH. To them were born six children; Martha, Samuel, Mary K. wife of W. H. Emmett, and Fannie who has gone before. Dilla of Rochelle and William of Perry, MO, remain to cheer and comfort the saintly widowed mother. Seven children called him “grandpa.” He also leaves in the broken circle, two brothers: Charles E. of Englewood Chicago, and T. H. Tibbles of Lincoln, NE, and one sister, Mrs. Laura A. Hunter of Macomb, IL.
The funeral services were held Tuesday afternoon at the home and church. Rev. Albertus Perry, Rev. Claude S. Moore, Rev. Glover C. Clark, Rev. W. J. Libberton and Rev. M. E. Cady assisted in the services.
Six ministers acted as bearers: Revs. Stone, Horn, Otjen, Farmiloe, Nazarien and Carpenter; the members of the G. A. R. acting as honorary bearers.
After a most impressive service at the church, the friends followed all that remains of the great preacher to the family lot at Lawnridge. There the ritual was read, the firing squad fired a volley and the bugler called taps.
Those attending the funeral from here were: P. F. Slater, E. B. Darnell and E. P. Gardiner. HR 3/2/1911

Dorothy Johanna Strem 1911.02.19
Dorothy Johanna, four and one half months old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Charles Strem, died February 23, 1911. Her brief life was like a waxy blossom and after twenty four hours of suffering she was taken to rest. Rev. George Dunlop had charge of the funeral service and she was laid to rest in Rose Hill Cemetery. HR 5/9/1911

Robert N. Newton 1911.02.20
Just as we had completed the run on last week’s issue of the paper, the news came that the body of Robert N. Newton, noted banker, turfman and business man, who jumped off the bridge at Ottawa February 1, 1911, had been taken from the waters, twenty five miles below Ottawa. For nearly three months he has been in the water, and of course the features were unrecognizable The identification was completed by washing out the overcoat, and by the fact that he was carrying his son’s watch, which had the name Arthur Newton, engraved in it. The watch was a present from the parents at the time the young man graduated in Yorkville.
The remains were sent to Yorkville Friday, and the funeral held Saturday morning, from the home of the deceased’s brother, W. R. Newton, president of the Yorkville National Bank. At the grave, the Masonic fraternity had charge of the services, and hundreds of fraternity men from all over the state were present. Among the many who came to pay their last respects to the memory of the popular horseman, were several well known owners from Chicago and other large cities.
Interment was made at Yorkville. The widow was not notified of the finding and burial of the body until after the funeral. About two weeks ago, Mrs. Newton and the two sons returned to Billings, MT, where Arthur is assistant city engineer, and it was not deemed advisable to bring the grief and pain of the funeral on them. HR 4/27/1911

Harriet M. Shonts Swift 1911.03.22
Mrs. S. M. Swift died suddenly Saturday, March 4, 1911 at D. C. Swift’s, after suffering a stroke of paralysis. She was one of the oldest pioneer settlers in Clinton Township. She possessed an admirable character, was a good neighbor and loyal to her family and home.
Harriett M. Shonts was born November 16, 1819, at Saratoga, NY. In 1844 she came to Kendall County and was united in marriage to Samuel Morton Swift, April 7, 1891. Eight years of their married life was spent near Bristol, when they bought the home place where, for fifty seven years she has lived, with the exception of the few years she resided in Waterman. To them were born seven children—two daughters dying early in life; the five remaining are Drew C. of this place; Eber M., Allen, NE; A. K., Sterling; Ernest, DeKalb, and Ellsworth of Birmingham, AL. Also to mourn her departure are eighteen grandchildren and six great grandchildren. Mr. Swift preceded her in death fourteen years ago. The funeral service was held Tuesday morning at the M. E. Church, Rev. J. E. Morris, the Baptist Pastor from Ashley, IL, formerly of this place, delivering the address. HR 3/9/1911

Emma Buerer Darling 1911.03.23
The passing away of Mrs. Lee darling, following the birth of twin boys, proved a shock to the entire community. Emma Buerer was born in Filmore County, NE. twenty seven years ago and her death occurred Thursday, March 2, 1911. When eleven years old, she moved with her parents to Hinckley, where she lived for thirteen years.
February 11, 1909, she was married to Lee Darling, who is left with her parents, also two sisters and two brothers, to mourn her departure. She was an ideal wife; her home was her haven. Saturday at two o’clock the funeral service was conducted from the M. E. Church, Rev. E. J. Aikin, who united these hands in wedlock, delivering the address. The tribute of flowers showed the esteem her many associates held for her. Mrs. F. A. Brown and Miss Hipple sang, while Mertis Garner accompanied at the organ. The pall bearers were Will Hipple, L. G. Fuller, Fred and Orvie Stryker, John and Charles Woods. Interment was at the Clinton Cemetery. Among those attending were Samuel Buerer, Mr. and Mrs. Will Buerer, Mr. and Mrs. George Kuter, Mr. and Mrs. Alvin Kuter, Mrs. Oscar Ramer, of Hinckley; Mr. and Mrs. George Buerer, Mr. and Mrs. Will Becker of Genoa; Mr. and Mrs. Will Darling, Goldfield, IA; Mr. and Mrs. Joe Willert, DeKalb; Mr. and Mrs. Nathan Grimm, Mrs. Will Buerer, of Pierce; Mrs. Ida Gramley, Kaneville, and Miss Minnie Price and Miss Lang of Sugar Grove. HR 3/9/1911

H. D. Judson 1911.03.24
The news flashed over the wire Saturday morning (March 14, 1911) and received at Hinckley by Agent Welton, telling of the death of Superintendent H. D. Judson at Rockville, TX, where he and Mrs. Judson had stopped for a few days while enroute in their private car to California for a few weeks of rest. The news struck home to every employee of the Burlington here, as all the employees seemed to know him and admire him personally.
His start in the late railroad career was at Mt. Morris, IL, where he went to work as a telegraph student for the Chicago & Iowa Railroad, now a part of the Burlington. He later was made train dispatcher of the same company at Rochelle.
In 1885 he was appointed general superintendent of the C. & I., holding that position until 1890, when the railroad was consolidated by the C. B. & Q. Railroad. He was then transferred to Aurora as superintendent of the Chicago Division of the C. B. & Q, now the Aurora Division and of which the C. & I. was a part.
After several years’ service as superintendent of the Chicago Division, he was promoted to superintendent of Illinois Lines, with headquarters at Galesburg. Later he was made general superintendent of the Illinois District with headquarters in Chicago. The headquarters were transferred to Galesburg about one year ago
The funeral train, bearing employees of the company, went through Hinckley and Waterman yesterday about noon, bound for Rochelle, where the funeral was held.
Among those from Hinckley who attended were Mr. H. D. Wagner and Mr. and Mrs. U. V. Welton. Mr. Wagner is a heavy stockholder in the company and a close personal friend of the late Mr. Judson. Mr. Judson was expected through here in a few days on an inspection trip, when he doubtless would have stopped off to visit with Mr. Wagner, as was his usual custom. Mr. Wagner has taken many inspection trips with the late superintendent.
Mr. Welton is agent at the Hinckley station and has been with the company at different points for many years.
HR 3/16/1911

Mr. Cass 1911.03.25
Dr. J. L. Cass was summoned to his old home in Pawnee, IL, by a telegram announcing the death of his father. The doctor did not know that his parent had been ill, and the attack was so sudden and conclusive there was no time to inform the Hinckley physician until the end had come Dr. Cass remained at the old home several days, helping with the settlement of matters following the sudden bereavement, and his friends here extend their sympathy. HR 3/30/1911

Isaac Potter 1911.03.26
Isaac Potter was born May 7, 1831, in Duchess County, NY, and his death occurred March 24, 1911 at his home near Waterman. He was the fifth of a family of six children. The only one remaining is Mrs. Fanny Burr, 86 years old, of DeKalb. Mr. Potter was united in marriage May 30, 1865 to Miss Mary Robinson. The following two years they lived in Wyoming County, NY, when they journeyed west, and for nine years lived near Aurora. To them one daughter was born, Mrs. Flora Bridge, who, with his wife, mourn his death. Thirty four years ago he bought the fine farm where he passed the declining years of life. In 1887 Mr. and Mrs. Potter moved to DeKalb where for ten years he took an active interest in educational and civic affairs, being a member of the school board. He was a member of the Masonic fraternity.
Thirty years he served as Justice of the Peace and a term of years as ………, besides holding many other offices. The funeral was held Sunday afternoon at his late home with Rev. George Dunlap delivering an appropriate address. Miss Andrews accompanied the quartet—T. H. Graham and H. E. Davis and Misses Sarah McFarlane and Florence Ro… as they sang. Mr. and Mrs. Potter returned from DeKalb to their farm that they might be near their daughter who has a beautiful farm and home across the road. Interment was at Johnson Grove Cemetery. Those attending from away were, Mrs. Fanny Burr and son, George Burr, Mrs. Hattie Rollins and Miss Lizzie Potter of DeKalb, Mr. and Mrs. Lewis Paulis and Mr. and Mrs. Will Rich and Miss Genevieve Johnson of Aurora. HR 3/30/1911

Orrin Breeding 1911.03.27
Gala Breeding
A bereavement doubly sad, occurred Saturday (March 25, 1911), at Davis Breeding’s, when Master Orrin Breeding, three years old, and only son, passed away. On the same day one week previous (March 18, 1911), Gala, an older sister, was taken. Both died of pneumonia following measles. Each was the picture of health and possessed unusual attractiveness. Their taking away has been so sudden it can scarcely be realized.
The funeral was held Monday at the Presbyterian Church, Rev. George Dunlap officiating. Misses Ivy Fearon and Georgia Davenport sang, with Miss Ruth Andrews accompanying. Burial was at Johnson Grove Cemetery. Irene, the nine months old baby has been sick, but seems much better, and it is sincerely hoped she may not contract the disease that has proved fatal to Orrin and Gala. HR 3/30/1911

Thomas Bennett 1911.03.28
Many friends were grieved to hear of the death of Thomas Bennett, who lived northeast of Waterman. Deceased had hosts of friends here. He was born in Ireland and has been a good citizen of the United States. He leaves a wife and six children. Funeral was Friday at 10 o’clock a.m. at DeKalb.
HR 3/30/1911
——————
Thomas Bennett was born in Marshallstown, Ireland, March 4, 1857. He had three brothers and three sisters. When he was eighteen years old, his father died. After his father’s death, he worked at the carpenter trade in Dublin and later in London. In October 1881, he and his sister Mary came to America. For two years he worked in New York and Philadelphia. In 1863 he came to Chicago and soon after came to Hinckley and for a number of years worked in this vicinity. March 17, 1890, he married Mrs. Carrie Hartman. With the exception of one year in Aurora, he has lived in the southeastern part of Afton Township, on the farm, which was known as the August Hartman estate, for twenty one years.
The funeral was held a St. Mary’s Catholic Church, DeKalb, Father Solon reading high mass. Interment was at the Catholic Cemetery. The floral offering were profuse and beautiful, the Modern Woodman of America presenting a handsome throw of calla lilies and carnations, and his children a blanket of American beauties.
He leaves a wife and five children, Mary, Myrtle, Thomas, George and Herbert.
Those from a distance who were present were:
Albert Hartman, Calhan, CO, Mr. and Mrs. George Tegtmann, Belvidere, Mr. and Mrs. Fred George, Aurora, Mr. and Mrs. Herman Hartman, Sycamore, Mr. Arthur Hartman, Genoa, Mr. Louis Hartman, Hampshire, Mr. and Mrs. Charles Hackman, Paw Paw. HR 4/6/1911

Mary Jenkins Murphy 1911.03.29
Mary Jenkins Murphy was born March 21, 1857; died March 30, 1911, after an illness of a rheumatic nature of about two months. The funeral was held from the M. E. Church Sunday. In July 1870, she went to Iowa, where she was married to Mr. Murphy April 22, 1884, after whose death in 1895, she again returned to Kaneville. Five children were born to them, all residents of this vicinity—William, Joseph, Thomas, Lina and Thirza Mrs. Murphy was the presiding officer of the local lodge of Mystic Workers, the members of which held her in high esteem. HR 4/13/1911

Ella E. Hanson Johnson 1911.04.13
Ella E. Hanson was born at Ottawa, IL, August 16, 1885 and died at her home one mile south of Waterman, April 18, 1911. She was the oldest daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Maynard Hanson. She was united in marriage to William Johnson, at Leland, February 19, 1903. She leaves to mourn her loss, a husband and three children, Russell LaVerne, aged 7, Sarah Juanita, aged 5, and Wilma Ella, just three weeks old, one sister, Ida Hanson, of Sandwich, four brothers, William of Ottawa, Harry and Albert of Seneca and Francis, of Minnesota. The funeral was held last Friday at the house, Rev. Dunlap, of Waterman, officiating, and was largely attended. Interment was in the Leland Cemetery. The family have the sympathy of many friends in this sad bereavement.
——————-
Mrs. W. N. Johnson, who has been afflicted with pulmonary trouble during the past four years, died Tuesday, April 18, 1911 at her home south of Waterman. Five months ago, symptoms were much worse and since then she has been continually under a nurse’s care and everything was done that medical aid advised.
Ella E. Hanson, oldest daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Maynard Hanson, was born August 16, 1885 at Ottawa, where she spent her girlhood until death claimed her parents. She was united in marriage to Will N. Johnson February 19, 1903, at Leland, who, with three children, Russell Laverne, age 7; Sarah Wyneta, age 5; and Wilma Ella, 3 weeks old, deeply mourn her demise. After living four years in the vicinity of Leland, Mr. and Mrs. Johnson moved south of Waterman, where they successfully farmed.
The funeral occurred Friday at her home where a large company of friends assembled. Rev George Dunlap of the Presbyterian Church delivered a thoughtful address. Misses Georgia Davenport, Mildred Whitford and Ruth Beiler sang, with Miss Andrews accompanying on the piano. The tribute of flowers showed plainly the place this young life was held in the hearts of relatives and friends. Mrs. Johnson was buried in Leland, where the service was continued. A quartet sang and the remains were viewed by many who were unable to attend the funeral at her home. She leaves one sister, Miss Ada Hanson of Sandwich, and four brothers—Will of Ottawa, Harry and Albert of Seneca, and Francis in Minnesota. Among the relatives attending from away were two aunts—Mrs. Leiset of Ottawa, and Mrs. Peterson and two daughters of Chicago.
HR 4/27/1911

Mrs. William (Roth) George 1911.04.16
Mrs. William George of Somonauk died at her home between one and two o’clock yesterday morning (April 19, 1911). Mrs. George was a sister of Mrs. H. H. Baie of Hinckley and Mr. and Mrs. Baie have spent several days at the bedside of their sick sister. The funeral will be held in Somonauk Friday afternoon. HR 4/20/1911
————————
Mrs. William George of Somonauk, sister of Mrs. H. H. Baie of Hinckley, died at her home in Somonauk, Wednesday morning, April 19, 1911 after an illness dating back to Thanksgiving day.
As she showed no signs of improvement she was taken to the
West Side hospital in Chicago, with the hopes that an operation would bring a return of her health. She submitted to an operation March 7 and returned to Somonauk March 21, says the Reveille.
Mrs. George was born at Hessan, Darmstoldt, Germany, December 8, 1846. She came to America at the age of three years with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Henry Roth, who located at Cottage Hill, near Chicago. A few years later they moved to a farm north of Hinckley.
She was united in marriage November 14, 1864 at Ottawa, to William George. The couple commenced housekeeping on Mr. George’s father’s farm south of Somonauk, and the following year they moved onto a farm which Mr. George bought north of Hinckley. After a residence of two years, they returned to Mr. George’s father’s farm, which he purchased. They made their home there until the spring of 1896 when they moved to Somonauk to enjoy the fruits of their labors.
Seven children were born to Mr. and Mrs. George: Mary Melhorn, Willows, CA; Ida Baie, Adrian, MO; Amelia Dumont, Earlville; Louise Sampson, Somonauk; Hattie Baie, Waterman; W. L. George, who lived with his parents; and Erwin Ludwig, all of whom, with the exception of the latter, who died in infancy, are left to share the sorrows of the grieved husband. She also leaves 14 grandchildren, two sisters, Mrs. Katherine Dellenback, Chicago, and Mrs. Minnie Baie of Hinckley.
Among those from Hinckley who attended the funeral were: Supervisor William Von Ohlen, Mr. and Mrs. H. H. Baie, Mr. and Mrs. Arvid Von Ohlen, Mrs. Amelia Ramer, Mr. and Mrs. Charles Darnell, Mr. and Mrs. William Haish, Mrs. Caroline Klein, Miss Mary Erhart, Mr. and Mrs. Louis George, Mr. and Mrs. Peter Bastian, Mr. and Mrs. Charles Bastian, Mr. and Mrs. Henry Morsch, Mr. and Mrs. Charles Reimsnider, Mrs. C H. Baie, Mr. and Mrs. Fred Reimsnider, Mrs. Palmer, Mrs. Henry Wahlgren, Mr. and Mrs. Troeger, Miss Nora Baie and August Reimsnider. HR 4/27/1911

Kathrina Mootz Anspach 1911.04.17
This community was shocked Friday afternoon (April 16, 1911) when the news of the death of Mrs. Henry Anspach was reported. For many years Mrs. Anspach has lived in Pierce and in the village of Hinckley, moving to town with the family about ten years ago. She had been ill but a few days. Dr. Owings of Hinckley, Dr. Brennecke of Aurora and Dr. Lord of Plano were called—an operation was performed, but the death angel could not be avoided. Friday, about a quarter to twelve, Mrs. Anspach passed to her final reward.
Kathrina Mootz was born June 28, 1852, near Wheaton, IL. When she was a girl of but four or five years, she moved , with her parents, to Pierce Township, where the greater part of her life was spent on the farm. In 1868 she was married to Henry Anspach who has the sympathy of the entire community in this sad bereavement. They had one son and one daughter—George, who died in infancy, and Maria, who is now the wife of Mr. Albert Reimsnyder, now living on the old home farm.
The funeral was held from the late home in Hinckley Monday afternoon at one o’clock. Pastor Hoefer of the Hinckley German Church having charge of the services. Rev. Rathmann, who holds a warm place in the hearts of the German people of this church, and who was especially a favorite with Mrs. Henry Anspach, was here from Chicago to assist in the last rites. The bearers were –Elihu Ramer, Ed. Bloom, Charles Leifheit, Oscar Ramer, Clarence Stryker, August Baie, Arvid Von Ohlen and John Geiger. Many beautiful floral offerings attested the esteem in which she was held by her friends.
It was one of the largest funerals held in Hinckley for a long time, and many people were here from other towns. Among those present from away were—Mrs. Mary Haener and the Schule boys of Pierce; Mrs. John Weiss of Aurora; Mr. and Mrs. Ed Dannewitz, Mr. and Mrs. Phillip Dannewitz, and Mr. and Mrs. Dolph Betz of Somonauk. HR 4/22/1911

Johannah Haley Ramer 1911.04.18
Many friends were grieved to hear of the death of Mrs. George Ramer, who passed away at the home of her daughter, Mrs. D. E. Orcutt in Aurora, Saturday, April 29, 1911. Mrs. Ramer had been suffering for some time, and while all held out the hope that she might recover, the end was inevitable, and the numerous family an many friends mourn her demise.
The funeral was held Tuesday at the Pierce Evangelical Church, Rev. C. K. Stockhowe, a former pastor of the church, was here to take charge of the services. The bearers were Jacob Blufelter, John Plapp, Fred Lentz, Albert Klotz, Will Kuhens and George Kuter.
Johannah Ramer, nee Haley, was born November 15, 1847, in Ireland. She came to this country when only nine years old. She was married to George Ramer, January 8, 1863, and to this union seven children were born—three boys and four girls, all of whom are living and were present at the funeral.
Mr. and Mrs. Ramer moved to Hinckley seven years ago. About two months ago, pernicious anemia set in and her life was forfeited last Saturday (April 30, 1911). She leaves to mourn, a husband and seven children, six grandchildren, one great grandchild, and one sister in Boston, MA. The children are Oscar, Robert and Ivan of Hinckley; Mrs. Henry Harter, Mrs. S. G. Sollenberger and Mrs. D. E. Orcutt of Aurora, and Mrs. A. E. Tipple of Prescott, IA. HR 5/4/1911

Adelia Moenkemeier 1911.04.19
A bright young life was taken Friday morning (April 28, 1911) at seven o’clock, when Miss Adelia Moenkemeier, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Charles Moenkemeier, passed away at her home, afflicted with spinal meningitis. Miss Adelia was born in Yorkville seven years ago the first of July. When a tiny baby she moved, with her parents, to this vicinity and has made her home here since.
The funeral was held from the home and from the Squaw Grove German Lutheran Church Monday afternoon, Pastor Kroeger taking charge of the services. One of the touching incidents of the last rites was the attendance of the young girl’s class in the Hinckley school, accompanied by their teacher, Miss Morrison. Many beautiful flowers attested the popularity of the young life that was called just in its budding beauty.
The bearers were young companions of the deceased—Ernest Rissman, Theodore Greise, Albert Leifheit and Herbert Leifheit. HR 5/4/1911

Robert Poille 1911.05.05
Word was received here this morning (May 4, 1911) of the death of Robert Poille at Kimball, MN. Mr. Poille only left here a week ago for a visit at that place. He was the father of Mrs. Thomas Darnell and well known here and was a member of the local GAR Post. The interment took place at Hinckley.
—————–
The body of Robert W. Poile was shipped to Hinckley Friday morning (May 5, 1911) from Kimball, MN, where Mr. Poile passed away at the home of his son Alfred T. Poile, at the age of 79 years, 2 months and 11 days.
Mr. Poile went to Minnesota a week or ten days ago, surprising his son and family on his arrival, and was just beginning to enjoy his visit when he was taken ill. The illness was brief, believed to be a development of asthma, with which he had been a sufferer several years. The end came within a day or so, and the remains were returned to Hinckley for the last sad rites and interment. His son Alfred, accompanied the remains of his father.
Saturday afternoon the funeral was held from the Rudolph Biehl home, Rev. W. W. Diehl of the Methodist Church having charge of the services. Burial was in the family lot at Greenwood Cemetery.
Deceased leaves two sons and a daughter—Henry and Alfred T. and Mrs. Thomas Darnell of Sandwich. He was the grandfather of the Poile Brothers, who formerly operated the Leifheit meat market in Hinckley. HR 5/11/1911

Gilbert H. Robertson 1911.05.06
Early last Wednesday morning death called one of our oldest and best known citizens in the person of Dr. Gilbert H. Robertson, whose demise comes after a short illness of a little over a week.
Dr. Robertson had been in poor health for a number of months, but much of the time was able to be about the house and make daily trips down town. The tragic death of his son, William, by drowning, was a severe shock to him and from that time a noticeable change in him was noted by his friends.
Dr. Robertson was born in Washington County, NY, November 28, 1831, and died at his home in this city on Wednesday morning, May 10, 1911, aged 79 years, 5 months and 12 days.
Dr. Robertson was reared on a farm and after receiving his primary education in the public schools, entered Union College, Schenectady, NY, from which he graduated in 1849. He later entered the Theological Seminary of the Associate Presbyterian Church at Cannonsburg, PA, from which he graduated in 1855. Leaving the Seminary he went out as missionary through New York and Pennsylvania, and in 1858 the Associate and Associate Reformed Presbyterian Churches having united, he was ordained, being the first minister ordained in the United Presbyterian Church. He then filled the pulpit at Hebron, NY, for two years.
In the spring of 1860 he accepted a call to the Park Presbyterian Church at Troy, NY, where he remained nearly five years, resigning because of failing health from disease incurred while serving the Christian Commission during the famous battles of the Wilderness and Spotsylvania.
In the spring of 1865 he came to Sandwich to accept a call from the Presbyterian Church.
Dr. Robertson reached Sandwich on Thursday, April 13, 1865, the day before President Lincoln was assassinated and his first sermon here was on Sunday night following, a memorial one to the martyred president. The preaching of this sermon was a Herculean task. The hall was filled to overflowing, and every expectation was at his height. Much was expected of the new minister. The attention was all that could be desired and he enthused the audience to such an extent that their expectations were more than realized. The meeting and that address were frequently spoken of for months and years.
After remaining in Sandwich for about two years, he went to Springfield, IL, as pastor of the Second Presbyterian Church and was there for four years. In the summer of 1870, Dr. Robertson received and accepted a unanimous call from the Chestnut Street Presbyterian Church of Louisville, KY, one of the largest and wealthiest ones in the state. During his pastorate in that city, he received the honorary degree of Doctor of Divinity from Danville College, Danville, KY. In the winter of 1872-73 he became editor of the Louisville Daily and Weekly Commercial, the leading Republican paper of the state of which General John M. Harlan, later one of the justices of the supreme court of the United States, was the leading stockholder.
In 1874 Dr. Robertson returned to Sandwich and purchased the Sandwich Gazette, making it one of the most popular papers in this section. For nearly seventeen years he was its editor and publisher. After turning over the management to his son, Harry, he was appointed deputy revenue collector with headquarters in Chicago. He had charge of the butterine department.
He was appointed postmaster of Sandwich by President Arthur with whom he was a schoolmate at Union College, and served in that capacity nearly five years, well into President Cleveland’s term. He was elected Mayor of Sandwich in 1899 on the no license ticket, serving two years.
While conducting the Gazette in Sandwich he also filled the pulpit of the Protestant Methodist Church at Somonauk from April 16, 1878 to April 18, 1885, during which time he made many staunch friends in that town and vicinity.
Dr. Robertson was married May 30,1859 to Miss Mary L. Beveridge, daughter of Rev. Thomas Beveridge, DD, who for many years was the leading professor of the Theological Seminary of the Associate and afterwards of the United Presbyterian Church.
To them were born three children, of whom but one survives, Mrs. S. P. Sedgwick. William H. was drowned in the Kankakee River near north Judson, IN, May 30, 1908, and Harry H., who died at Delavan, WI February 4, 1910.
In the death of Dr. Robertson Sandwich loses one of its best known citizens. Until forced into retirement by the infirmities of age, he was always much in demand as a public speaker, at the last sad services of friends to be laid away and performed many wedding ceremonies. In the pulpit or on the platform he had few equals and many have said no superiors as a minister or speaker.
The funeral services will be held tomorrow afternoon at two o’clock from the home of Mr. and Mrs. S. P. Sedgwick, conducted by Rev. D. M. Ogilvie, of the Presbyterian Church. The interment will be at Oak Ridge Cemetery.
——————-
One of DeKalb County’s most prominent men, in ministerial, editorial and political circles, passed away at Sandwich last week, when Dr. G. H. Robertson was called. His has been a long and active life, and in speaking of his many attainments, the Sandwich Free Press says:
DR Robertson reached Sandwich Thursday, April 13, 1865, the day before President Lincoln was assassinated, and his first sermon here was on Sunday night following a memorial one to the martyred president. The preaching of this sermon was a Herculean task. The hall was filled to overflowing, and every expectation was at its height. Much was expected of the new minister. The attention was all that could be desired and he enthused the audience to such an extent that their expectations were more than realized. The meeting and that address were frequently spoken of for months and years.
After remaining in Sandwich for about two years, he went to Springfield, IL, as pastor of the Second Presbyterian Church and was there for four years. In the summer of 1870 Dr. Robertson received and accepted a unanimous call from the Chestnut Presbyterian Church of Louisville, KY, one of the largest and wealthiest ones in the state. During his pastorate in that city he received the honorary degree of Doctor of Divinity from Danville College, Danville, KY. In the winter of 1872-73 he became editor of the Louisville Daily and Weekly Commercial, the leading Republican paper of the state of which General John M. Harlan, later one of the justices of the Supreme Court of the United States, was the leading stockholder.
In 1874 Dr. Robertson returned to Sandwich and purchased the Sandwich Gazette, making it one of the most popular papers in this section. For nearly seventeen years he was its editor and publisher. After turning over its management to his son Harry, he was appointed Deputy Revenue Collector with headquarters in Chicago. He had charge of the butterine department.
He was appointed Postmaster of Sandwich by President Arthur, with whom he was a schoolmate at Union College, and served in that capacity nearly five years, well into President Cleveland’s term. He was elected Mayor of Sandwich in 1899 on the no-license ticket, serving two years.
While conducting the Gazette in Sandwich he also filled the pulpit of the Protestant Methodist Church at Somonauk from April 16, 1878 to April 18, 1885, during which time he made many staunch friends in that town and vicinity. HR 5/18/1911

Mary ( ) Halloway Wood 1911.05.16
On Monday afternoon (May 8, 1911) at the Presbyterian Church, the funeral service of Mrs. Mary Wood occurred, Rev. George Dunlap delivering the address. Misses Ivy Fearon and Georgia Davenport sang with Miss Andrews accompanying at the organ. N. F. Davenport, Will Nelson, John Harvey and Walter Drake were the bearers. Interment was at the Clinton Cemetery. Mrs. Woods was born in Ireland and died of old age and heart disease. Her age is not known. For twenty six years she lived in this village. She was twice married—James Halloway being her first husband, and eleven years ago she was married to Jackson Wood, and since his death, three years ago, she has lived alone. The sad feature of this service was that not a kinsman was present. HR 5/11/1911

Fred Lemar Charles 1911.05.17
The news dispatches of Monday morning (May 8, 1911) contained the following tragic story:
“I have made a failure of life. Please look over what I have done.”
This message, addressed to his widow, was found beside the body of Prof. Fred Lemar Charles of the University of Illinois when colleagues broke open the door of his room last night.
Prof. Charles had choked himself to death and the method of suicide was such that the teacher must have used almost superhuman power to accomplish his purpose. He had buckled an ordinary book strap around his neck and then pulled it until he succeeded in shutting off his windpipe.
So torturing was the method that the instructor must have possessed an iron will, say his faculty associates. Many minutes were required before the strap did the work.
Prof. Charles had been in his room for several hours, but Mrs. Charles had not disturbed him, as he had told her he intended to sleep. For six weeks he had been afflicted with insomnia which undoubtedly preyed upon his mind. In the last five years he had two attacks of nervous prostration and only recently had returned from a long rest.
He was 38 years old and left a widow and two children. He was a graduate of Northwestern University, and came to the University of Illinois from the Illinois Normal School at DeKalb two years ago.
The widow of the late instructor was a Kendall County girl, graduating at the Yorkville High School. It was while specializing at DeKalb under the professor that she first became acquainted with him. The cause of his death, other than melancholia, is not understood by his friends, as all who knew him thought he was prospering in his work. HR 5/11/1911

Sherman Dunkelberger 1911.05.18
Sherman Dunkelberger passed away Sunday night (May 10, 1911) at the East Side Hospital. He was born forty seven years ago in Pennsylvania and had been a resident of Illinois for seventeen years. He leaves a wife and four children—two daughters and two sons. The oldest, thirteen years, Lewis, was stricken with the same disease at the hospital since Friday. For many years Mr. Dunkelberger has farmed the Brouthton place near Carlton, and during his past illness the neighbors showed their loyalty by turning out and keeping up his farm work. The funeral was held Tuesday afternoon at the Afton Church where a large company of friends assembled, Rev. George Dunlap delivering the address. In his passing not only has the family been deprived of a leader, but the entire community will miss a good man. HR 5/18/1911

Mrs. Frank Winslow 1911.05.19
Many of our people went to Big Rock Monday morning (May 22, 1911) to attend the funeral of Mrs. Frank Winslow, who had relatives and many friends in Hinckley, where she was born and raised. Mrs. Winslow was the wife of a former operator of the Burlington Railroad at Hinckley and lived here for many years, forming those ties of friendship and affiliation which time even cannot sever. The people of this neighborhood were shocked to hear of her demise, although she had been an invalid for a long time.
The remains were brought to Big Rock on the westbound morning passenger and the service held from the Big Rock Church. HR 5/25/1911

Daughter Smith 1911.06.03
Youngest daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Frank Smith was born November 20, 1909, at Big Rock, Kane County, IL, and died at the home of her parents in Plano, June 1, 1911, after a four week’s illness of complicated diseases.
Besides her parents she leaves to mourn her loss, one sister, Pearle E., her grandparents, Mrs. Charles Biehl, of Hinckley, IL, Mr. and Mrs. Frank Smith, of Sandwich, and a great grandfather, Charles Biehl, of Naperville, IL, three aunts, four uncles, and one cousin.
After a short funeral service, held at the family home in Plano Saturday afternoon, the baby was taken to the home of her grandmother, Mrs. Biehl, in Hinckley, where the final service was held Sunday at 3 o’clock, with Rev. Clyde S. Boyer, of Plano, officiating at both services. She was laid to rest in Greenwood Cemetery. –Plano News.
——————
The nineteen month old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Harry Smith of Plano was buried at Hinckley Sunday. The little girl’s mother was Miss Lizzie Biehl before her marriage and she lived in Hinckley nearly all her life. Many relatives and friends here extend their sincere sympathy to the parents in this taking away of such a young and promising life. HR 6/5/1911

Emma Brechbiel Reiminsnider 1911.06.05
Emma Brechbiel, wife of William Reiminsnider, was born January 11, 1887, in Victor Township, and departed this life June 12, 1911, at three o’clock, the cause of her death being acute Bright’s disease. She was 34 years, 5 months and 1 day old. She began to fail in health a little over a year ago, and was practically under medical care ever since. After a poor spell of two weeks, she was taken to the St. Charles Hospital in Aurora, four weeks ago, but she began to fail gradually and in accordance of her own request she was brought home last Friday morning, and although everything possible was done, the best of care and medical attention, her sickness progressed rapidly and on Monday morning she quietly passed away. She leaves to mourn her loss, her husband, Mr. William Reiminsnider, her daughter, Eva, her parents, Mr. and Mrs. John Brechbiel, six sisters, Mrs. A. Rompf, Mrs. Ed. Menk, Mrs. John Shales, Mrs. G. Shales, Mrs. August Menk, Miss Rose Brechbiel, two brothers, George and John Brechbiel. Mrs. Reiminsnider was a quiet going and home loving woman, who traveled her particular path of life with patience and forgiving. The funeral was held at one o’clock Wednesday at the house and at 1:30 at the Lutheran Church and the remains were laid to their last resting place in Oak Ridge Cemetery. Rev. F. Suhren conducted the services.
——————
The Somonauk Reveille prints the following obituary of Mrs. William Riminsnider of that place, whose funeral was attended by several relatives from Hinckley:
Mrs. William Riminsnider departed this life at the home of her parents, Mr. and Mrs. John Brechbiel at three o’clock Monday morning, June 12, 1911, aged 34 years 5 months and 1 day. She was taken sick about a year and a half ago, since which time she was in poor health. About six weeks ago there was a turn for the worse and two weeks ago she was taken to the St. Charles Hospital at Aurora, where she spent three weeks without improvement. She was brought to the home of her parents last Friday morning in accordance with her own request. Notwithstanding the best of care and medical aid she continued to fail until she entered upon her last sleep Monday morning (June 18, 1911).
Mrs. Riminsnider was born January 11, 1877 in Victor Township, where she was reared to womanhood. She was united in marriage to William Riminsnider May 19, 1897. To this union was born one child, Eva.
There are left to mourn her death: her husband and daughter, Eva; parents, Mr. and Mrs. John Brechbiel; six sisters, Mrs. A. Rompf, Mrs. E. Menk, Mrs. J. Shales, Mrs. A. Menk, Mrs. Rose Brechbiel; and two brothers, George and John Brechbiel.
The funeral was held at the Lutheran Church at 1:30 Wednesday afternoon, services being conducted by Rev. F. Suhren. Interment took place at Oak Ridge Cemetery.
The following from out of town were present at the funeral: John Brechbiel, Chicago; G. Shales and family, Sandwich; August Riminsnider and family and George Riminsnider and family, Hinckley; Joseph Cox and family, Shabbona.
HR 6/22/1911

Herman Shultz 1911.06.07
Mr. and Mrs. George Hazemann went to Waterman on Monday to attend the funeral services of his cousin, Herman Shultz, a well known farmer, living a mile and a half southwest of Waterman, and very widely known in this city, who was fatally injured in a terrible accident which happened on Thursday afternoon at his farm.
The breaking of a rope which was used in hauling him to the top of a well in which he had been working caused him to fall a distance of 38 feet and he was impaled on a large plank which was standing upright in the bottom of the well. The plank ran almost through his body and injuries were inflicted from which he died on Saturday (June 17, 1911).
It seems that Mr. Shultz was cleaning out an old well on his place and was 38 feet from the surface working. He had several planks which he used to board up the side of the well. For some reason he went to the top, the job being about finished.
Just as the top was reached and the young man stepped from the bucket to the ground, the rope broke and he fell from the top of the excavation the entire distance to the bottom of the well. When he struck the bottom, the plank struck him in the side and the force of the impact drove it nearly through his body. He was brought to the surface and Dr. Greeley was summoned and the victim taken to the Greeley Hospital. The plank was driven far into his body.
Mrs. Shultz was in DeKalb at the time of the accident and when the news was conveyed to her that her husband was hurt, John Cook’s auto was pressed into service and a wonderfully fast ride was made to the home. Then another trip was made to the city for Dr. Everett. On this trip Mr. Cook made the 12 miles in a little over 20 minutes. The injured man’s sufferings were terrible.
Mr. Shultz was about 36 years of age and leaves a wife and two children.
——————
Never in the history of Clinton Township was a more horrible accident than that of Friday afternoon (June 17, 1911) when Herman Schultz fell into a 38 foot well, striking a four inch board that impaled him and passed almost through his body. Mr. Schultz had completed the work and upon reaching the top of the pit, the rope broke and the terrible accident occurred. Dr. Greeley was on the scene in a short time and carried the injured man to his hospital. Dr. Pratt of Chicago was summoned, but no human aid could help the injured man—and death relieved his suffering within twenty four hours.
The funeral occurred Monday at his home, Rev. E.J. Aikin officiating, and Miss Mabel Hipple and Mrs. F. A. Brown sang. Interment was near Shabbona. The tribute of flowers was the largest ever seen at any service here.
Herman Schultz was born 38 years ago last November at Somonauk. Fourteen years ago he was united in marriage to Cynthia Cox of Shabbona, who, with one daughter, Ethel, 13 years old, and one son, Raymond, 10 years, old, mourn his death. Those present at the service from away were: Mrs. Zaina Soldow, his mother, and Mr. and Mrs. Harry Fraser, Gilmore City, IA; Mr. and Mrs. Rudolph Schultz, Moulton, IA; Mrs. Jeanie Haley, Otto and Bert Soldow, Humbolt, IA; Mrs. Vina Von Ohlen and family; Mr. and Mrs. Charles Olson, Mr. and Mrs. Isaac Arnold, Mr. and Mrs. Joe Arnold of Leland; Mr. and Mrs. Ben Arnold, Mr. and Mrs. Alfred Arnold, Mrs. Goodmanson and Mr. and Mrs. Felix Dolder, Somonauk; Mrs. Charles Dolder, Mr. and Mrs. Ed Dolder, Sheridan; Mrs. Amelia Leifheit and Miss Myrtle of DeKalb; Mr. and Mrs. George Hageman, Mr. and Mrs. Ed Hageman, Sandwich; Mr. and Mrs. Herman Von Ohlen, Hinckley. HR 6/23/1911

Dewitt Greenfield 1911.06.10
The funeral of Dewitt Greenfield occurred Monday (June 5, 1911) from the home of his sister, Mrs. Charlie Johnson, near Shabbona Grove. Rev. George Dunlop delivered the address. Misses Iva Fearon and Frances Andrews and George Hall sang and Mrs. McFarlane accompanied on the piano. Mr. Greenfield’S death occurred after complications following measles. He was 41 years old and leaves one brother and two sisters. HR 6/8/1911

Lorenzo Tabor 1911.06.11
The funeral of Lorenzo Tabor occurred Friday morning at the Waterman Methodist Church, Rev. E. J. Aikin delivering the address. Mr. Tabor was born September 22, 1856, in Nassau County, NY, and died June 20, 1911 at Elgin. When he first came to Illinois he located at Paw Paw and thirty seven years ago moved to Waterman. He was united in marriage to Emma Wiltse, Mrs. Sarah Wiltse’s oldest daughter, but she preceded him in death thirteen years ago. Mr. and Mrs. Tabor lived in Aurora twenty five years, where he served in the fire department and for several years was captain of No. 3 Hose Company. During his visits at this place since his wife’s death, he formed many friendships who regret his taking away. He leaves two sisters and three brothers. Those from away who attended the service were Mr. and Mrs. Will Cruthe of Webster City, IA; Mr. and Mrs. Will Tabor and daughter of Chicago; Mr. and Mrs. Dell Tabor, Yorkville; William Tabor and son, Vern, Paw Paw; and Mr. and Mrs. George Demminy, Paw Paw. HR 6/29/1911

Helen Voss Cherry 1911.07.05
Returning home from a social function Saturday evening, Mrs. Helen Voss Cherry seemed in good health and spirits. Shortly after, she complained of feeling badly and in a short time she was dead. Learning the sad news early Sunday morning, the many friends in Yorkville, Oswego and vicinity could not realize the truth of the report and waited hopefully for some word to come that it was an error. But Monday brought the confirmation and the community is in deep sympathy with the bereaved parents and husband. Mrs. Cherry had been complaining of the heat, but was seemingly in her usual health when she returned home on Saturday. When she complained of feeling ill, doctors were summoned but by the time they arrived it was beyond any human power to save her life.
This death is a particularly sad one. Helen Voss was the only daughter of Mr. and Mrs. L. P. Voss, of Oswego and was one of the brightest and most popular young ladies of that town. She was born in that village May 11, 1887, and received her education in the schools there. She was married to Clifford A. Cherry, only son of Charles T. Cherry, about a year ago Christmas, and they have made their home in Aurora. About a month ago they moved into their new home on Downer place, and the future had nothing but brightness for them. The death of his wife, following the death of his mother a few years ago, makes life seem hard to Mr. Cherry.
The funeral was held from the Galena Street Methodist Church Tuesday afternoon with the services in charge of the Rev. J. W. Heiland. Interment was in the family lot at the Oswego Cemetery. –Yorkville Record
——————-
The sudden death of Mrs. Helen Voss Cherry, who died at the new home she and her husband had occupied but two weeks in Aurora, saddened many people in Hinckley. Mrs. Cherry was the only child of Dr. and Mrs. L. P. Voss of Oswego, and the Voss families are known to many people here. Her uncle, Gus H. Voss was a former sheriff of Kendall County.
Her husband, Clifford Cherry, also comes from one of the old Kendall County families, the Cherry family being in Na-au-say Township, near the homestead of the Wheelers, formerly of Hinckley. Mr. Cherry’s father, Hon. C. T. Cherry, has his winter home adjoining Mr. Coster’s property in Daytona, FL.
Mrs. Cherry had been out to a reception Saturday afternoon (July 8, 1911) and was sitting on the veranda of her home with her husband in the evening. She complained of being faint, and a stimulant was administered. She did not regain consciousness and before the physicians could arrive she had passed away. She was married to Mr. Cherry a year ago last Christmas. Mrs. Cherry was a beautiful girl of twenty five years, and her genial companionship will be sadly missed by a host of friends.
HR 7/13/1911

Edward Elmer Davis 1911.07.11
Word was received here Sunday (July 23, 1911) of the death of Eddie Davis, at Waukesha, WI. He, with his family went there a few weeks ago on account of his health, but he was taken worse and died. The remains were brought to Hinckley Monday night and the funeral was held Monday afternoon, Rev. Diehl officiating, and the burial was in the West Big Rock Cemetery.
——————
Eddie Davis as he was so popularly known in this neighborhood, died at Waukesha, WI, Sunday, July 23, 1911. He had been at the watering place for several weeks in search of better health, but it seemed that nothing helped him. His remains were brought home Monday and the funeral was held at the house Wednesday afternoon, Rev. W. W. Diehl of the Hinckley Methodist Church officiating. A male quartet from Big Rock sang. The bearers were A. J. Miller, John Williams, Gus Bastian, Ed. Ashton, Thomas Hughes and Christ Skau.
Edwin Elmer Davis was born in Big Rock, December 18, 1861. He was the son of Evan and Amelia Davis. He was married at Woodstock, November 15, 1905 to Miss Beatrice Mander, and they had two children—Rachel, 5 years old and the little baby boy, Evan, who is but thirteen months old.
No one in this locality had more friends, nor truer friends, than Eddie Davis. The great concourse of people at his funeral yesterday bore mute witness to the high regard in which he was held by all. Even after the earth received its kind, there was a strong inclination on the part of friends to linger about the last resting place. He was a true and honest man—the kind of men needed in the world today—and his taking away just in the prime of life seems an inopportune occurrence.
The wife and children are receiving the sincere sympathy of hosts of friends and the sentiment must aid in a small way to assuage the grief of his death. Other relatives surviving are Mrs. Thomas Morris, a sister, and John James and Mrs. Alvin Kuter, cousins who were reared in the same home with Mr. Davis.
HR 7/27/1911

Minnie Moenkemeier 1911.07.13
The Record of Yorkville of Wednesday night says:
“Mrs. Minnie Moenkemeier died early this morning (July 5, 1911) at the home of her daughter, Mrs. William Henne, after an illness lasting some four years. She was ninety five years of age February 10, last and was one of the oldest settlers of Kendall County. She has four daughters and a son living near Yorkville—Mrs. William Wollenweber, Mrs. George Leifheit, Mrs. George Heeg, Mrs. William Henne and August Moenkemeier. The funeral will be held from the home of Mr. Henne Friday at noon and at the German Lutheran Cross Church later. Services in charge of Rev. J. H. Rabe.”
Many people in this neighborhood knew Mrs. Moenkemeier, and she has several relatives and descendants living near Hinckley. Doubtless a good number from here will attend the funeral. HR 7/6/1911

Beatrice Taylor Norris 1911.07.14
A dispatch to J. J. Flanders the latter part of the week brought the news of the sad death of Mrs. Beatrice Tayor-Norris at Cosnovia, MI. The information saddened many hearts in Hinckley, where the Taylor family are old time residents.
Just a year or so ago, Mrs. Norris visited in Hinckley, prior to her marriage to Mr. Norris, and the young ladies held several receptions and pleasant functions in her honor. She was a general favorite with the Hinckley people. From Hinckley the Taylor family moved to Aurora, and after her marriage she made her home in Cosnovia, MI.
Death came Friday morning (July 7, 1911) and the little twin boys are thus left without the tender care of a mother. Mr. and Mrs. J. J. Flanders and Mr. and Mrs. Lyle Flanders left Hinckley Saturday night and attended the funeral, which was held from the late home Sunday. HR 7/13/1911

Chris Fagan 1911.08.04
Chris Fagan, a well known farmer living on the Wiltberger farm south of Afton, was instantly killed Monday evening (August 7, 1911) by being thrown from his buggy through the friskiness of his horse. Mr. Fagan was a farmer of about fifty years of age and leaves no family except two brothers, James, of Afton and John, who lives on South Second St., DeKalb.
The accident happened about six o’clock. Mr. Fagan came to town to meet a friend who was coming to visit him and to stay some time. He met his friend and then in company with a neighbor, started for his farm home. The three men were quite a load for the narrow buggy, but the drive was made all right until they were within a short distance of the home of Mr. Fagan. Then in some manner the horse became frightened and started to run away. Mr. Fagan was thrown when the animal made a short turn, and instantly killed.
His neighbor thought he was only stunned and ran to a neighboring house to get aid, but upon his return found that the aged farmer was dead and that the friend had become frightened and ran away leaving the body alone.
Coroner Morris, of Kirkland, was summoned and an inquest was held to decide upon the facts of the case. Mr. Fagan was an old and respected resident of this section and had hosts of friends in DeKalb and vicinity, who will mourn his death. The funeral was held from St. Mary’s Church..–DeKalb Chronicle
—————–
Chris Fagan, who made his home with his brother, James on the William Wiltberger farm north of Waterman, was instantly killed Tuesday evening (August 8, 1911) by being thrown from a buggy. Chris and a neighbor went to DeKalb to meet a friend. The three men were crowded in the one seat vehicle and proved a good load for the one horse But while near home about six p.m., the beast got frightened and ran away. Chris was thrown out and his neck was broken. The funeral was held at the Catholic Church in DeKalb. HR 8/10/1911

Mrs. Jacob F. Plapp 1911.08.15
The Sycamore Republican says:
Mrs. Jacob F. Plapp, a resident of Pierce Township since 1848, died at the Sycamore Hospital last Friday night (August 11, 1911 at the advanced age of 91 years. She had been at the hospital for about a month. Her death was due to the infirmities incident to her great age.
Mrs. Plapp was born September 25, 1820, in Wurtenberg, Germany, but became a resident of this country when she was a girl. She was married in 1850 to Jacob F. Plapp. He was also a native of Wurtenberg. In 1838 he set out on a sailing vessel for the Western Continent, and after a passage of 42 days, landed at Baltimore. He worked on a farm and made his way, mostly on foot, to Kane County, IL, where he was employed, until he came to DeKalb County and began farming in 1848. When he fixed his residence in Pierce, he was obliged to go to Geneva, sixteen miles distant, for grist-mill privileges, an was obliged to take his crops to Chicago with an ox team, which required four days because of the bad trails and unbridged sloughs. Mr. Plapp departed this life at his home in Pierce January 25, 1885.
Mr. and Mrs. Plapp were the parents of nine children, who are surviving and well known citizens of the county, several being residents of Pierce and Malta townships. They are Jacob, Mrs. Mary Beiser, Phillip, David, Aaron, Jonathan, Mrs. Joseph Sitzer, Johanna and Mrs. Cassie Wallsworth.
Mrs. Plapp was the mother of Jacob, father of Aaron Plapp of Hinckley, the implement dealer. She was a mighty and esteemed pioneer of this vicinity and nearly everyone in this community knew her.
She had seventy one grandchildren and great grandchildren, and a majority of them were in attendance at the funeral Monday. Mr. and Mrs. Plapp of Hinckley were also present.
HR 8/17/1911

Amelia Abrnes Hage 1911.08.16
Quite a number of our people went to Yorkville Sunday (August 20, 1911) where they attended the funeral of Mrs. Amelia Abrnes Hage, wife of Herman Hage, a brother of George Hage of Hinckley. The young wife had been ill for several years, and her passing away, while sad to her wide circle of relatives and friends, is a merciful deliverance to her. Among those who went from here were Mr. and Mrs. George Hage and children, Mary and Lester; Mr. and Mrs. August Baie; Dolph Leifheit and family, Mrs. Granart and Mrs. Fred Wedkemper, Miss Alma Hage, who had been visiting in Yorkville several days, returned home with her parents. It was a large funeral, attended by many friends and relatives, and the floral tributes indicated the high esteem in which they young wife was held by all who knew her. HR 8/24/1911

Helen Rose 1911.08.17
Thursday forenoon at the home of J. A. Tallman occurred the funeral service of Mrs. Helen Rose, whose remains were sent here from Cleveland, OH. Rev. E. J. Aikin delivered the address. Hymns were sung by Miss Mabel Hipple and Mrs. Cynthia Roberts.
Helen Rose was born March 28, 1838 in Washington County, NY, and died at the home of her grandson, Eber Rose, August 21, 1911, in Cleveland. During the two years she has been staying at this home, she has been extremely feeble and unable to care for herself. In 1853 she moved with her parents to Illinois and the following year she was married to Edwin Rose. To them were born three children—two, with the father, have preceded Mrs. Rose into death’s valley. The remaining daughter, Mrs. Timothy Matlock, resides at Grand Junction, CO. There is one brother living at Angel Camp, CA, and one sister, Mrs. Flora Tallman, of this place, and three grandchildren who cherish her admirable character. Practically, Waterman has always been Mr. Rose’s home. She possessed a quiet disposition. Although in poor health for many years, she bore the burden uncomplaingly. She was a sister in mercy in every way possible and her many friends will long revere her name.
HR 8/31/1911

William J. Foster 1911.09.04
Will Foster left Plano last week for the St. Joseph Hospital with a lot of courage and faith that an operation would give him relief from cancer, but it proved the other way. After the operation, Dr. Sherman gave no hope and he gradually sank away until death came as a relief Monday (September 4, 1911).
The funeral services will be held tomorrow in charge of Rev. C. E. Boyer and the Mystic Workers Lodge, of which he is a member, 1:30 from the house and 2:00 o’clock from the Baptist Church. All Mystic Workers are requested to be out and at the hall at 1 p.m. sharp.
——————–
The sad news of the death of William J. Foster was received here Tuesday night (September 5, 1911), and many fiends regret his demise. For many years he was in the Dean Market, and as this was his home for many years, all our people knew him well. He died following an operation at the St. Joseph Hospital, aged fifty eight years. Mr. Foster was born in the east but had spent the greater portion of his life in Plano and Hinckley He leaves to mourn his loss, a wife and three sons—Manuel of Oklahoma, Frank and Melvin of Plano; Mrs. William Boley of Plano, and Mrs. Emma Carr of Wichita, KS, sisters; and Charles Foster of Aurora. The funeral will be held from his late home in Plano this afternoon at two o’clock. Burial will take place at Plano.
HR 9/7/1911

George Ramer 1911.09.10
Mr. George Ramer died very suddenly at his home on Lincoln Avenue (Hinckley), Friday morning (September 22, 1911) of heart trouble. The funeral was held Sunday afternoon at the East Pierce Church and burial was in the East Pierce Cemetery.
—————–
George Ramer passed away at his home in Hinckley Friday noon (September 22, 1911), death coming suddenly from heart disease. He had been sitting on his porch, and was greeted by many friends during the noon hour as people were going to the noonday meal. In just a few moments later he passed away.
Mr. Ramer was born in Dauphin County, OH, April 27, 1844, the youngest of ten children, all of whom, with the exception of one brother, have passed away. He came to Illinois when a small boy, and was married to Miss Hanna Haley January 28, 1863. To them were born four daughters and three sons, all of whom were present at the funeral.
About five months ago, Mrs. Ramer passed away, and since her death the venerable man has gradually failed, until life closed its portals last Friday afternoon.
Seven children, six grandchildren, and one great grandchild, one brother and many warm friends mourn his loss. During his illness and failing health, they have been a source of constant help and comfort to him, and the friends who have visited him so often, with Mr. Peter Bish calling every day of the week, life had been made as pleasant as possible under the circumstances.
The funeral was held Sunday from the home and from the church in Pierce, Rev. Stockhowe of Streator, a former pastor, officiating. The bearers from the home were S. V. Howell, Ed Bloom, Fred Witteman, August Borchers, E. P. Gardiner and George Kuter. At the church the bearers were Albert Klotz, George Kuter, Fred Lentz, Will Junes, Jacob Pflugfelder and John Plapp. Music was furnished by Mrs. Elmer Schumacher, Miss Maude Lentz, Albert and Elmer Schumacher, with Mrs. Albert Stomacher at the piano. HR 9/28/1911

Erastus Dean 1911.09.12
Erastus Dean was born at Red Mills, Putnam County, NY, July 18, 1831, and died at his home in Waterman, IL, September 28, 1911, of cancer of the stomach, which ran a rapid course. In 1846, with his parents, he moved to Big Rock, IL. He was united in marriage to Charlotte L. Pearl, October 12, 1859 in Afton Township. The celebrating of their fiftieth wedding anniversary nearly two years ago, at their son’s home proved one of the greatest social events ever attended in the village. To this union eleven children were born, eight boys and three girls. The eldest three are dead and the remaining eight are all married and maintaining homes of their own–Charles O., of Hinckley, William E. and Elbert P., of this place, Cornelius C., living at Somonauk, Mrs. Jennie Clark, of Hinckley, Mrs. Lyle Price, residing on the home farm, John W., of Sandwich and Fred J., of Mt. Morris. The boys are equally divided, three are butchers and three are druggists, all established in business for themselves. Others to mourn his passing are an invalid wife and fifteen grandchildren, five boys and ten girls, also one brother, Lewis A. Dean, of Big Rock, and one sister, Mrs. Marian King, of Aurora.
Mr. Dean carried on the butcher business at Shabbona Grove for six years and when Waterman was platted, thirty seven years ago, he opened the first meat market in this place and for a quarter of a century carried on this line of business.
The funeral service occurred Saturday afternoon from his late home and friends were in attendance from all over the county. The tribute of flowers, silent tokens of esteem, was immense, huge banks were arranged over and under the casket. Rev. Dunlap, pastor of the Presbyterian Church assisted Rev. Aikin, of the M. E. Church with the service. Sacred hymns were sung by Miss Hipple and Mrs. F. A. Brown. The six sons were pall bearers. Interment was at Afton Center Cemetery.
In the passing of Mr. Dean, the family has lost a counselor, the town an esteemed citizen, the friends, a person loyal to the name. Although at the four score mile stone, he never grew old–he was one of nature’s sons and reveled in her beauty.
–Shabbona Express
—————–
Erastus Dean was born at Red Mills, Putnam County, NY, July 18, 1831. He came to Big Rock, IL, with his parents in 1846 and was the oldest of seven children. At the age of 18, Mr. Dean lost his father. In 1857 he came to Afton Township, where he was married to Charlotte L. Pearl, October 12, 1859. This worthy couple celebrated their golden wedding two years ago here in Waterman at the home of their son, William E. Dean.
Mr. and Mrs. Dean moved to Shabbona Grove in 1867 and from there to Waterman six years later and have resided here until his death last Thursday (September 28, 1911).
Eleven children were born to this union—eight boys and three girls. The three oldest are dead.
He leaves to mourn his loss-one brother, Lewis A. Dean of Big Rock, a sister, Mrs. Marion King of Aurora; his aged wife and the following children: Charles O. Dean of Hinckley, William E. Dean and Elbert P. Dean, of Waterman, Cornelius C. Dean of Somonauk, Mrs. Jennie Dean Clark of Hinckley, Mrs. Lurla Dean Price of Afton, John W. Dean of Sandwich and Fred J. Dean of Mount Morris. There are fifteen grandchildren—five boys and ten girls.
Mr. Dean was a strong business man and lived to see all his sons established in business for themselves. When one of the sons said he would come again soon to see him, he replied: “Do not neglect your business for me.” He was of a cheerful disposition and the home gatherings of this family have been many and comforting to this aged couple.
Mr. Dean was conscious up to the last. His desire was to have all of his children present to bid them good-bye, and by an almost superhuman effort he held himself for the coming of the one absent son. All were present at his death. After bidding them all farewell he refused any further aid and said he was ready to go.
The funeral service occurred Saturday afternoon at the late home and was largely attended. Rev. E. J. Aikin of the Methodist Church delivered the address with Rev. George Dunlap of the Presbyterian Church assisting. Hymns were sung by Miss Hipple and Mrs. F. A. Brown. The casket was one huge bank of flowers. The six sons were pall bearers, and interment was in Afton Center Cemetery.
He was one of nature’s sons and reveled in all its beauty. Although past the four-score milestone, he never seemed to grow old. Mrs. Dean has been an invalid for years, and by the taking away of her helpmate and husband, she has suffered a severe shock.
Among those attending from away were—Mrs. Mariam King, Mr. and Mrs. A. D. King, Miss Minnie King, Mrs. Frank Hewett and Alfred Rogers, Aurora; Mr. and Mrs. H. A. Dean, Mr. and Mrs. Elmer Dean Smith, Cleveland and Mr. and Mrs. John McDaiarmid, Big Rock; Mr. and Mrs. Robert Gibson of Chana; Mr. and Mrs. R. A. Reynolds and Mr. and Mrs. W. D. Reynolds, Morrison; Mrs. Delia Robinson, Fred Ferguson, Belvidere; Mr. and Mrs. Albert Greenacre, H. D. Wagner, J. A. Fahs, George Taylor, Dr. and Mrs. George Fry, Hinckley; Will Fulton and Charles Flanders, Sycamore; Mr. and Mrs. C. N. Pritchard, DeKalb; Michael Gilmore, Rockford; Mr. and Mrs. Hugh Price, Sandwich; J. N. Antoine, C. H. White, H. C. Hupp, Professor Hubbard, Dr. Chamberlain, Leonard Thorpe, Somonauk; and Mr. and Mrs. Bert Bowers, West Pullman.
HR 10/5/1911

Oscar Wahlgren 1911.09.16
Oscar Wahlgren, aged 46 years, of Cortland, committed suicide Monday morning (September 18, 1911) by swallowing a quantity of carbolic acid. The unfortunate man rose about five o’clock and emptied a vial of the acid down his throat.
His wife was immediately aroused and tried to use such remedies as she knew, but the victim refused to take any of them and died some time afterwards. He was conscious until death approached but persisted in refusing to give any reason for the suicide and the cause of the act is considerable of a mystery.
Mr. Wahlgren has been in poor health for some time past, but so far as is known had nothing else to cause him unhappiness as his domestic relations were pleasant and he was prosperous in his business affairs.
He has been employed for a long time in the Cortland Creamery and was well known to Hinckley people.
Deceased is survived by a wife and three children as well as sisters and brothers. HR 9/21/1911

Eugene Anderson 1911.09.17
Last Friday morning (September 15, 1911) the residents of Yorkville were shocked by the news that Master Eugene Anderson, a youngster from West Pullman, visiting his grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. Eugene Regan, at Yorkville, had fallen into the old Blackberry mill race, and drowned. The young boy had started home from the mill to do an errand for his father, who was visiting with the manager. On the way home the boy had to cross the creek, and in doing so, he slipped and fell in. The water was let out of the race dam, and the little fellow’s body was found on the bottom. HR 9/21/1911

William A. Garrett 1911.09.18
William A. Garrett died in Aurora Tuesday morning (September 19, 1911) following a lingering illness. He leaves to mourn his loss, a wife and three daughters—Mrs. G. J. Krause of Aurora, Mrs. W. S. Smith of Chicago, Mrs. A. C. Moorehouse of Chicago and two brothers—Oliver Kramer of Chicago and John Powers of Hinckley and three sisters—Mrs. Anna Kelley of Aurora, Mrs. Vernie Walters of Aurora and Mrs. Cora Miller of Chicago. The funeral will be held Thursday morning at 8:30 o’clock from the house on Fifth Street and the burial in Hinckley where his first wife and daughter are buried.
Mr. Garrett was a well known contractor and builder in Hinckley for many years and he did a great deal of high class work in this vicinity. Many friends regret to hear of his passing away. HR 9/21/1911

Henry George 1911.09.19
Tuesday night, September 26, 1911, Henry George passed away at the home of his daughter, Mrs. Thomas Bennett, where he has lived for several years. A sturdy German immigrant, progenitor of a numerous and prosperous family, a good farmer and citizen and neighbor has been taken in this visitation of death.
Henry George was born in Germany in 1833 and came to America in 1850, settling first near Somonauk. Then he moved to Pierce and with the exception of a year or so in Chicago, he has lived in this vicinity ever since.
His illness dates back three or four months. He spent some time in a hospital in Chicago in an effort to secure relief, but the end was staved off but a few months. Eight children survive him—Mrs. Thomas Bennett, Waterman; Fred George, Aurora; Henry George, Aurora; Mrs. George Pegman, Belvidere; Mrs. Herman Hartman, Sycamore; Mrs. Charles Hackman, Paw Paw; Albert George, Belvidere; and Louis George, Hinckley.
The funeral will be held from the home of Mrs. Bennett tomorrow, Friday, at noon, and from there the cortege will move to the Pierce Evangelical Lutheran Church, of which Rev. Hoefer of Hinckley is pastor. Interment will be in Greenwood Cemetery, at Hinckley. HR 9/28/1911

Mrs. Merritt Potter 1911.09.20
The sad news was received in Hinckley this morning telling of the death by tuberculosis of Mrs. Merritt Potter of New York, who passed away at her late home yesterday (September 27, 1911).
Mr. Potter is a son of Mr. and Mrs. Frank Potter of Aurora, former residents of Hinckley, and many warm friends here sympathize with him in this sad loss. They had been married but a few years, and since their marriage the dread disease has made its fatal inroads on the young wife’s health. Details as yet are meager, as the news must necessarily come by wire, but the funeral will doubtless be held Saturday, with interment in New York.
Mr. Frank Potter of Aurora, father of the bereaved husband, left Aurora yesterday for New York, where he will be with his son in the hour of affliction. HR 9/28/1911

Nellie Leonie McPherson Lugo 1911.09.21
The remains of Mrs. Joe Lugo were brought here Thursday. The service was held at the Methodist Church and Rev. E. J. Aikin officiated. Miss Hipple and Mrs. F. A. Brown sang and interment was at Clinton Cemetery.
Nellie Leonie McPherson was born June 2, 1884, and died at Springfield September 26, 1911, after an operation. When four years old, she was adopted into the home of Mr. and Mrs. Alonzo Satterlee. November 29, 1900, she was married to George Joseph Lugo. Four children were born to them, two dying in infancy; George, age 10, and Loretta, age 3, survive her. Mr. and Mrs. Lugo recently lived in Aurora, but since June, Mrs. Lugo has been with her parents in Springfield.
HR 10/5/1911

Sarah Williamson Graham 1911.10.08
Mrs. Sarah Graham, aged ninety eight years, probably the oldest person in DeKalb County and a resident of this section since 1849, passed away at the old homestead near Sandwich, where she has lived for sixty two years, last Friday (October 27, 1911).
There was no sickness and no pain attendant upon her death. She merely fell asleep at night as usual at the close of a day of some activity about her home, never to awaken in life again. Mrs. Graham retained her faculties practically unimpaired until the last. Two years ago her hearing became somewhat defective, but that was all.
Mrs. Graham was the mother of five children, four of whom are living. They are Andrew Graham, who resided upon a farm near Aurora, Rev. Russell Graham, who was a pastor for 12 years in the United Presbyterian Church and who for the past twenty five years has been a professor in Monmouth College, at Monmouth, IL, Mrs. Margaret McCleery, who lived on a farm near her mother, and the youngest child, James Graham, with whom the mother lived upon the old homestead. A daughter, Mrs. Mary Ann McAllister died ten years ago.
Of Mrs. Graham’s direct descendants there were five children, and she leaves thirty grandchildren and five great grand children, and five great great grandchildren. The five great grandchildren are the children of Mrs. Susie Souder and their names are Grace, Mary, Ralph and Ruth. In 1904 a reunion was held on the old home farm and three fourths of the family were present numbering more than fifty. Practically all of Mrs. Graham’s descendants are living in DeKalb County, only a few of them reside in Texas and others in Kansas.
For several years Mrs. Graham had the pleasure of seeing five generations gathered at home.
Sarah Williamson Graham was born in Washington County, NY, on the shore of Lake George, June 5, 1813. Her father, Daniel Williamson was a native of Scotland, and her mother, Margaret Rea, was born in County Down, Ireland.
The deceased spent her girlhood days at her birthplace and on March 20, 1834 she married Robert Graham. They spent three years in that neighborhood and then came to Columbus, OH, where they remained twelve years. In 1849 they decided to come west and started out with their family, the youngest child only an infant in arms, in a covered wagon.
Arriving near Sandwich, Mr. Graham purchased land from the government and they established a farm home seven miles northwest of this place. The husband died twenty years ago. He was a strong man and had never been sick. One day, however, he injured his foot and a short time later gangrene set in. For fifteen months he endured great pain, and only death relieved his sufferings.
When only four weeks old, Mrs. Graham was baptized and has been a member of the church ever since. She was one of the founders of the United Presbyterian Church near her home.
The funeral was held Saturday at 2 o’clock at the home, Rev. Acheson in charge, and interment was in the family lot in Oak Mound Cemetery.
——————
Sarah Williamson Graham was born in a log house in Putnam Township, Washington County, NY, June 18, 1813, and died Friday October 27, 1911. She was 98 years old last June and was one of DeKalb County’s oldest settlers.
Daniel Williamson, her father, a native of Cromaty, Eastern Scotland, came to New York when a young man. Her mother, Margaret Ray, came to the same state from County Down, Ireland. “Aunt Sarah” was the fourth child of this union.
March 20, 1834, she was united in marriage to Robert Graham, Rev. Alexander Gordon reading the service in a United Presbyterian Church, and for fifty seven years they walked hand in hand down life’s broad way. Mr. Graham left the east in 1837, via the Erie Canal to Buffalo, and by steamboat to Cleveland and again by canal boat to Hebron, near where they located and lived for over twelve years. In the fall of 1849 again they embarked by boat to Chicago and by stage to Somonauk, where they selected the prairie homestead. This chosen quarter section has been Mrs. Graham’s home for over 61 years. Many social gatherings have been arranged in her honor. Their golden wedding was celebrated in 1884; in 1904 on her ninety first birthday, was one of the greatest events ever held in this vicinity.
Mr. Graham died in 1891 and was 86 years old. Mrs. Margaret McCleery is her only living daughter. The three sons are Andrew of Aurora, Russell of Monmouth and James with whom Aunt Sarah made her home during her declining years. The family now living number over 80. One son and one grandson are ministers; one grandson a physician. There are twenty nine grandchildren, thirty four great grandchildren, four great great grandchildren and every one lives in accordance to the cold water pledge. A. R. Robertson of Aurora is her only nephew in this state. The funeral service was conducted Saturday afternoon from her late home, Rev. John Atchenson, Pastor of the United Presbyterian Church delivering the address. Interment was at Oak Mound Cemetery. HR 11/2/1911

Catherine Shoop Gerlach 1911.11.13
This afternoon at one o’clock in the Methodist Church, the funeral of Mrs. S. D. Gerlach was held, and there was a big company of sorrowing friends present to attest their high esteem of this good woman, who, after being an invalid for nearly three years, has passed on to her great and final reward.
Mrs. Gerlach passed away at her home in Hinckley early Tuesday morning (November 7, 1911). For many weeks she had been confined to her bed. She bore her affliction patiently. She was surrounded by all the tender care of husband and children, and her last hours were as homelike as could be.
When a little girl, Mrs. Gerlach came to Pierce Township from Ohio, with her parents. In the neighboring township she lived—was raised, educated and married—and then, in 1893 she moved to Hinckley with her husband. A wide circle of friends in this part of the county will feel the grief that comes with mortality; a great many intimate acquaintances who have known her since the early days, will realize that one more of the elderly people has gone to a well deserved reward. HR 11/9/1911
—————
Catherine Shoop was born in Brokenswood, Crawford County, OH, February 18, 1839, and died at her home in Hinckley November 7, 1911. She came with her parents to Pierce Township when but a child. July 23, 1857, she was married to S. D. Gerlach, and in 1893 they moved to their Hinckley home, which has been saddened by her departure.
Mr. and Mrs. S. D. Gerlach were blessed with seven children, two or whom have passed away. The other five children, her husband, one sister, one brother, twelve grandchildren and four great grandchildren remain to mourn her loss.
Mrs. Gerlach was a member of the Pierce Evangelical Church from 1857 to the time of her removal to Hinckley and since then she has been a member of the local Methodist Church, from whence the funeral was held Thursday afternoon, Pastor Diehl officiating. HR 11/16/1911

George R. Herold 1911.11.14
After meeting friends “down town” in Aurora last week for the first time in two months, George R. Herold returned to his home one afternoon, where he remained but a couple of days, then passed suddenly away, leaving a place in the hearts of his friends that no other will be able to fill.
Physically handicapped as he was since his severe sickness when a small boy, still he was always patient and enduring, cheerful, and true to his large circle of friends. He never complained of his condition, accepting it as a portion of his life with such cheerful philosophy that caused perfect men to wonder why they themselves found so much fault with this earthly existence.
George R. Herold was born in New York state, February 16, 1859, and came to Illinois when a small boy with his parents. He lived on the farm west of Hinckley for many years, then moved to town, about nine or ten years ago he moved to Aurora, where he passed away at his home with the Illsmans. A funeral service was held in Aurora Sunday afternoon (November 19, 1911), and several friends and relatives from here attended. Monday morning the remains were brought to Hinckley, and the services continued at the St. Paul’s Church in town, Pastor Hoeffer officiating, with the Aurora pastor assisting. Burial was in Greenwood Cemetery. The bearers were Fred Wedkemper, Barney Walthers, Ed Bloom, Albert Molitor, Dudley Loptien and Ernest Peckamn, all old time friends of the deceased.
HR 11/23/1911
Charles Frederick Feazel 1911.12.01
Maude Hughes Feazel
“There will be no Merry Christmas at our house tomorrow.” Little did the one suspect that instead of a happy Christmas, a fearful tragedy would be enacted near her home so soon after she heard those fateful words.
With all the evidences of Christmas time about her, gifts for those near and dear to her laid away, awaiting the time when the wrappers were to be broken and the joy to come to her as the presents were accepted, Mrs. Fred Feazel fired one shot that made her husband lifeless and in a very few seconds fired another that felled her at the feet of him with whom so many happy days had been spent.
The announcement of the tragedy spread a pall over the entire city, taking away much of the happy, joyous Christmas spirit.
There was no one in the house to witness the terrible act of a demented woman, save the little blue eyed baby boy in its cradle, but a few feet away.
The inference is that Mr. and Mrs. Feazel had just finished the morning meal and the appearance of the table was that Mrs. Feazel had eaten nothing. What occurred at that time is hidden in the grave. Mr. Feazel had left the table and gone into the room where his baby was, and evidently was followed by his wife. He doubtless kissed the baby and then turned to go out of the room to get his hat, which lay on the table and his coat, and go down town. As he was about to pass through the double doors between the dining room and the bedroom and with his back to Mrs. Feazel, she drew from her clothes an Iver Johnson 32 caliber revolver, and at close range fired the death dealing bullet into the head of her husband, the ball taking effect at the base of the brain. Without a word or a moan he fell forward upon his face, with his hands underneath him. Blood spurted from the wound and dyed the carpet about him. Stepping around the prostrate form of her husband, she stepped to the back door and called for Mrs. John Francis to come over as quickly as possible. Returning to the bedroom and before a glass, she placed the muzzle of the gun at her right temple and pulled the trigger. The first cartridge failed to explode and she again pulled the trigger of the gun, which was a self acting one, and this time with more success. The bullet passed entirely through her head and was found flattened out upon the carpet. A fourth bullet was exploded and the theory is that as she fell she again pulled the trigger. While there is no evidence that she attempted the life of her baby, yet some believe that one of the shots was intended for the little one.
The ball from the fourth cartridge was found embedded in the side of the book case. As it entered the woodwork with a glancing blow, tending upwards, substantiates the theory that she pulled the trigger as she fell, and that she did not wish to take the life of her baby boy.
Mrs. Feazel fell with her feet at those of her husband, with the revolver but a few inches away from her hand. Never has a town been so thoroughly shocked as at the news of this fearful tragedy. Our people stood aghast, hardly believing that Mrs. Feazel could commit such a deed.
That she was deranged, there is not the slightest question.
The time of Mrs. Feazel’s trouble dated back to about ten days after the birth of her little boy, which was September 1, 1911. Up to that time she was getting along nicely. On the tenth or eleventh day after the baby’s coming, she became excited and nervous from some cause or other, and from that time to her death, save only at short intervals, was never herself. All that a loving and indulgent husband could do in care and medical assistance was done for her, but she failed to rally, and was always brooding over the condition of her health, and that of her baby. It was always uppermost in her thought and despite the efforts of her husband, relatives and friends, this despondency could not be shaken off. And it was this continued brooding that brought her mind to such a state that the killing of herself and husband resulted. While known to be demented at times, no one, not even her husband, relatives or attending physician believed she would do such a deed.
On several occasions she said to friends that she would never be well again and that her death was only a short time away, and when it came she did not want to leave her husband and baby alone. Before the coming of the baby, she took all the interest possible to be taken by an expectant mother. The most beautiful of clothes she made for it and to her intimate friends told of the plans she had. It was with great joy that she awaited its coming, and during the few days after its birth gave it all the attention a fond mother could. But in the subsequent days, this mother’s love was turned almost to hate and only at intervals would she have anything to do with its care and attention.
That she had carefully planned the taking of the life of her husband and of herself for some time, there seems little doubt. Friends can now see from words she spoke and the things she did that that was her intention. The meaning of little things she did the day and night before, regarding plans for Christmas day and of gifts to her relatives, became too well known after she had taken the life of her husband and herself and made her boy an orphan.
The funeral services of Mr. and Mrs. Feazel were held jointly at the now desolate home on Wednesday afternoon, conducted by Dr. J. M. Lewis and Rev. D. M. Ogilvie, both delivering beautiful eulogies of this young couple.
The pallbearers were selected from a social club, of which both were members. For Fred there was Harry McKee, Nels Peterson, Ed. Diller, Fred Whitson, Clarence Bark, and D. M. Losee. For Mrs. Feazel, W. H. Menk, Leroy Sawyer, Fred Stein, Emory Stockham, Harry Stolp, and Leslie Whitfield.
Charles Frederick Feazel was born in Northville Township, January 11, 1879, and was a son of Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Feazel, of this city. When three months of age, his parents moved to Iowa, where his early childhood was spent, returning with them in 1893 to Sandwich, which has since been his home. His boyhood days were of more than ordinary activity and promise, and while attending school he began working as a clerk in the store owned by Charles Corlinsky, and when his school days were over, devoted his entire time to his chosen work. Fred at once took a great interest in the store and his pleasing personality, close application to business, his capabilities and trustworthiness made him the selection of Mr. Corlinsky for manager of the store when he chose to retire. How well Fred managed the store is seen in the fine trade that has come to it under his regime. Fred was one of the very best young men Sandwich has ever produced. He was just in the prime of life with many years of usefulness ahead, and at that he should be so ruthlessly cut down, is deplored by all.
He was married to Miss Maude Hughes, April 16, 1903, and no couple ever started out under brighter skies than they.
He is survived by his little son, Raymond Hughes Feazel, not yet four months old, his parents, two sisters, Misses Mattie and Nellie Feazel, and one brother, Joseph Feazel, Jr.
Mrs. Feazel was born in Sandwich January 23, 1880, and is a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. David Hughes. Her entire life has been spent in this city. Of a happy and cheerful disposition, she won for herself a large circle of acquaintances.
Her baby is bereft of a mother’s care; and a father and mother, one sister, Mrs. Dan Dickinson, and one brother, David Hughes, Jr., are left to mourn her sad death.
Rev. Ogilvie, in his eulogy, said in part: “There are but four dates that stand out distinctly in the brief story of Mrs. Maude Feazel. Her birth, January 27, 1880, her marriage on April 16, 1903, the birth of her baby on the first of last September, and her death last Sabbath morning. The time that lies between the first and the last of these dates was practically all spent in this community, and much of it spent in such a way, first in the store of her father, and later in that managed by her husband, as to bring her into direct contact with the public. In these circumstances, it would be foolish for me to stand here and try to tell you what she was. As a member of this community, as a dutiful daughter, as a living and beloved wife, who was in all things her husband’s helpmate, most of you know her better than I, and need no testimony of mine as to her character and worth. But as we stand today by these two lifeless forms, the age long question as has bewildered the brain and wrung the heart of humanity in all the centuries; the question that concerns the whence and the why of sin, and sorrow comes home to our hearts with tenfold power.
Why would every woman who would attain to motherhood, the very blossom and crown of womanhood, drink deeply of the cup of anguish and go down into the valley of the shadow of death, accepting the possibility that she may return no more to the land of the living, or return perchance with broken body or shattered mind? As we are confronted by such a question, we are constrained to say: Now we see as in a mirror darkly, and yet looming out of the darkness we may catch glimpses of a divinely beneficent purpose, to bless the race by permitting none but heroines to be its mother. Also it may be that the sacred thing we call mother love, which so sweetly shields and shelters the little pilgrim on the shores of time can be distilled only from the hopes and fears, the travail pains and birth pangs that are the prelude to motherhood. One thing we must not forget. She who comes into the estate of motherhood with clouded brain or shattered mind is no more blamable for the illusions that fill the days with anguish and the nights with fear, than is her sister, for the physical pains or weaknesses that remind her of the Gethjsemane through which she has come. It was this last Sabbath morning, that led our sister to take not only her own life, but a life dearer than her own. We stand before such a tragedy dumb with grief and wonderment. We may be ready to admit the place of sorrow in God’s plan of blessing for the race but we cannot understand why the bitter cup should be put into our hands, and why we should perforce drink it to its dregs. We can but say: Now we know in part, then shall we know even as we have been known. For so surely as God is love, the day is coming, when the goodness and the love that was mingled with our cup of sorrow shall be clearly recognized.”
Both caskets were of the same design and were nearly hidden from view by the wealth of flowers sent by relatives and friends, testifying in their mute way the high esteem in which both were held. At Oak Ridge both caskets were lowered to their last resting place together in one grave. The caskets were encased in cement vaults. They were together in life and death has not separated them.
On Monday morning Deputy Coroner Jacob Burkhart impaneled the jury, who after viewing the lifeless remains of Mr. and Mrs. Feazel, as they lay in their once happy home, adjourned to meet at the city hall on Tuesday evening to continue the inquest, when Coroner J. D. Morris would arrive and take charge of the same.
Mrs. John Francis was the first witness called. She said Mrs. Feazel called for her to come over as quickly as possible. Mrs. Francis at first supposed the baby was sick and went into the house. As she opened the door, she saw Mrs. Feazel fall to the floor. Catching the baby from its little crib she returned to her own home after calling Mr. and Mrs. Louis Reihm, who lived nearby. She also telephoned to the home of Joseph Feazel, Sr.
In answer to the question of Mrs. Feazel’s health, Mrs. Francis stated that since the coming of the baby, Mrs. Feazel was despondent and melancholic, an often spoke of there being no help for her and that she would never be well again. Her condition was even worse when the baby would have times of sickness, so common among children of its age. Mrs. Francis would try to cheer her up, and at times Mrs. Feazel would seem to be herself again, and take great interest in her home and baby. On Saturday, Mrs. Feazel was at the Francis home and she seemed to be much depressed. As she was about to leave, Mrs. Feazel threw her arms around Mrs. Francis’ neck and sobbed. When she went out of the door, Mrs. Francis wished her a Merry Christmas, to which Mrs. Feazel replied, “Thirazh, (Mrs. Francis’ given name) there will be no Merry Christmas at our house.” These words came back to Mrs. Francis with awful force on the morning following, when she learned of the terrible deed. Mrs. Francis said that up to about ten days after the baby was born, the home life of Mr. and Mrs. Feazel was one of the happiest and most pleasant. Mrs. Feazel often spoke of her home and husband and said she had everything to live for, that all the kindness and attention possible was shown her by her husband and his people.
She testified as to seeing the body of Mr. Feazel lying upon his face in a pool of blood in the doorway.
It was between sobs and with great difficulty that Mrs. Francis replied to the questions asked by the coroner.
Mrs. Louis Reihm was then called and corroborated the testimony of Mrs. Francis as to the finding of the bodies, as did also Mr. Reihm.
Joseph Feazel, Jr., a brother of the deceased, was then called. He stated that he saw Mrs. Feazel in the store on Saturday evening and had at that time noticed she was very nervous and not herself. He saw his brother last alive about eleven o’clock when the store was closed and both went to their homes. His testimony regarding Mrs. Feazel was about the same as that given by Mrs. Francis. He knew of Mr. Feazel having a revolver, but did not know where he kept it, had seen it some time ago but did not think he could identify it. He stated that up to within a few weeks after the baby was born, the relations of his brother and wife were the most happy and they enjoyed one another’s company.
David Hughes, Jr., a brother of Mrs. Feazel, was called to the stand. He stated that his sister had been taken to a nerve specialist in Chicago, who diagnosed her case as melancholia in a mild form and that she could do more for herself than any physician and that her complete recovery was only a matter of a short time. He also stated that he had noticed at various times the condition of his sister and the look in her eyes.
Dr. Wormley was called. He stated he was called to the house on Sunday morning with Dr. G. S. Culver, and that life in both bodies was extinct, when they examined them. He stated that the wounds in the back of the head of Mr. Feazel and in the temple of Mrs. Feazel were fatal and the death resulted instantly in both cases. As to who died first could only be obtained by an autopsy. Though never having been called as a physician at the home, he had seen Mrs. Feazel upon the streets and believed she was suffering from an attach of melancholia, He also stated that people becoming violent from this form of melancholia and doing such deeds were very rare.
Dr. Turner, who was her physician, and attended her during confinement, stated that Mrs. Feazel was suffering from melancholia, dating back from a few days after her baby came, That she was in his office on Saturday evening, consulting him about the health of her baby. At that time she appeared in about the same condition as she had for some time past. He stated that in very rare cases melancholia would follow childbirth, but it was in very rare cases that the afflicted would resort to deeds of violence. He corroborated the testimony of Mr. Hughes of her consulting a specialist in Chicago.
Jacob Burkhart, Jr., was called and testified as to the finding of the bodies of Mr. and Mrs. Feazel upon the floor and also the revolver.
The jury, composed of C. G. Faxon, H. A. Severy, C. L. Stinson, Will Seeber, Fred Whitson and Clarence Bark returned the following verdict.
Charles Frederick Feazel
Find that he came to his death by a gun shot wound, inflicted by his wife, Maude Feazel, while temporarily insane, said wound being at the base of the brain.
Mrs. Maude Feazel
Find that she came to her death by a gunshot wound inflicted by her own hand, while temporarily insane, said wound being in the right temple.
Among those who attended the funeral services from out of town were Alexander Shaw and wife, of Elgin, D. A. Hughes and wife, of Chicago, Mr. and Mrs. August Drillion, of Chillicothe, IL, George Bernard, of Columbus, OH, Mrs. Paul Schneider, of Pound, WI, Joseph Antoine and two daughters, of Leland, Charles Corlinsky and wife, of Chicago, Mr. and Mrs. Will Barnes, of Plano.
——————-
Early Sunday morning the city of Sandwich was shocked by one of the most terrible and most pitiable tragedies that ever occurred in DeKalb County, when the citizens heard that Mrs. Fred Feazel had shot and killed her husband, shot at her four months old baby, then turned the gun on herself and committed suicide. Mr. Feazel was manager of the Corliinsky Store in Sandwich, and his wife was the daughter of David Hughes, a well known retired business man.
The young couple led an ideal home life. They were extremely devoted to each other. About four months ago a little baby came into their home, and since the birth of the baby, Mrs. Feazel has been in poor health, her condition affecting her mind at times. It was while in one of these despondent moods that she committed the terrible deed.
The young husband had stepped into the bedroom to kiss his sleeping child. Then he went to the sitting room door, where his wife was waiting for him, and started for town to get some of he Christmas packages that had been left over the night before. He kissed his wife, and turned to go out the door, when she pulled up the gun and shot him in the back of the head. He fell dead in the doorway. She rushed out of doors and called to the neighbors. Reentering, she fired one shot at the baby’s crib, then shot and killed herself.
When the neighbors arrived they were shocked by finding the two dead bodies.
The tragedy has put the entire city of Sandwich in an extremely sad mood, as both young people were very popular, well known, and among the best citizens of the city. They were well known in Hinckley and Waterman, and many friends here are grieved over the occurrence. HR 12/28/1911

Angeline Ream Schumacher 1911.12.16
One of the most tragic deaths that has visited this community for many years was that of Mr. S. J. Schumacher, who was stricken with a failure of the heart while talking with her husband in their home Tuesday morning (December 5, 1911).
She fell forward, her head resting on the table, just as she was in the middle of a sentence. From that time on she had passed into the hands of her Maker, as she never regained consciousness, death being almost instantaneous.
The funeral will be held Friday afternoon at one o’clock at the house and two o’clock at the East Pierce Church. Rev. Mr. Tobias of Rockford will be the clergyman in charge of the last sad rites.
Friday afternoon Mr. and Mrs. Schumacher were in Hinckley—she to call on her doctor—Dr. Owings—and he to transact business errands. They were a kindly couple—good, honest church folks, known and beloved by almost everybody in this vicinity. Mr. Schumacher called at the Review office and visited here for several minutes, expressing the sentiment he felt at this season of the year—all the good things that we have to be thankful for, the efforts we should put forth to make others happy. They returned to their farm home later in the afternoon, and during Tuesday, Mrs. Schumacher was about the house as usual, doing her home duties, and noting no change for the worse in her condition. While talking with her husband she was called—called suddenly, and a wide circle of friends grieve with Mr. Schumacher in loss of this good woman. HR 12/7/1911
—————-
The funeral of Mrs. S. J. Schumacher , who died so suddenly last week Tuesday, was held from the East Pierce Church Friday afternoon, and there was a large attendance of relatives and friends to pay their respects to the memory of this good woman.
She was born in Hampshire, IL, January 22, 1858, and in 1884 she was married to Mr. Schumacher. They were a happy couple and their home life has always been ideal, and the husband greatly misses the comforting presence of his life-long helpmate.
Mrs. Schumacher is survived by her husband, her aged father, two sisters and one brother. HR 12/14/1911
——————
Mrs. Angeline Schumacher, daughter of brother and sister Ephriem Ream, born in Hampshire, Kane County, IL, January 22, 1858, went home to be with the Lord December 5, 1911, age 53 years, 9 months and 13 days, She was married February 27, 1884, to Serennes J. Schumacher, with whom she lived an honest and true life nearly 28 years. She became a Christian about 24 years ago, under the ministry of Rev. J. H. Johnson and united with the Evangelical Association at the time of her conversion, and remained a member of the same until nearly 9 years ago when she removed to Odebolt, IA, to take care of her invalid mother. She remained a true Christian and was always willing to support the cause of Christ.
The father, husband, brothers and sisters wish to return their thanks to the many helping and comforting friends.
HR 12/14/1911

Fred J. Wiltsie 1911.12.17
Relatives and friends were shocked Sunday to learn of the sudden death of Fred J. Wiltsie at Aurora. For eighteen years he has been identified with the Automatic, and for eight years has been foreman in the hub assembling department. He did his usual day’s work Saturday (December 9, 1911), ate a hearty supper and sat down to read, when he complained of feeling sick. Almost immediately he suffered a stroke of apoplexy. Two doctors were called, who stayed with him until the inevitable was over.
He was born October 7, 1861, in Oswego County, NY, for forty years he has resided in Illinois, many years having been spent in this vicinity. He leaves to mourn his departure a widow, an aged mother and one brother, George. The last two reside in Waterman. The funeral service was held Tuesday at his home in Aurora. The remains were brought to Waterman Wednesday and burial was in the Clinton Cemetery. HR 12/14/1911

James Hubbard 1911.12.18
Word was received in Hinckley Friday night (December 8, 1911) telling of the sudden death of James Hubbard, at his home in LeMars, IA, where he had made his home for a number of years. He was a member of the prominent Hubbard family of DeKalb County, and had a wide circle of acquaintances, who mourn with the surviving relatives in the grief of his death.
Mr. Hubbard was born in Pierce Township January 10, 1853, and in 1874 he was married to Miss Phoebe Cone of Sycamore. Soon after the birth of the youngest daughter, Mrs. Hubbard passed away, and Mr. Hubbard made his home in Hinckley for some time following. Later he moved to LeMars, IA, where he had his home up to the time of his death.
The remains were brought to Hinckley on one of the fast trains Monday morning, and the funeral services held Tuesday afternoon, Rev. W. W. Diehl having charge of the services. The bearers were Elias Meyers, Fred C. Schmidt, Arch Evans, William Cheney, James Hastie and H. J. Wilcox.
Deceased leaves to mourn his departure, three daughters—Mrs. Russell McClellan, Mrs. Edgar Foster and Mrs. John Brode; three brothers—Albert, George and Elmer Hubbard, and one sister, Miss Marrietta Hubbard. HR 12/14/1911

Alice Coulson 1911.12.19
When Hinckley relatives and friends heard the news by telegram Friday night (December 15, 1911), and in the Chicago papers Saturday morning, that Miss Alice Coulson had been found dead in her room, they were stricken with grief at the untimely passing away of this splendid woman. Everyone hoped that there had been some mistake in the identification by the Chicago authorities, but Saturday morning Rev. W. W. Diehl and Mr. Nash went to the city, and identified the remains positively and brought the body home Saturday night.
Miss Coulson was the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. William D. Coulson of Hinckley. Many years of her life she has devoted to teaching school, instructing the young minds, and the last few years she has zealously worked among the missions of the big cities, doing a great and good work independently. Here at home she held a warm place in the hearts of a big circle of friends. Her disposition to always help someone—her kindly acts of mercy—her quiet, unassuming demeanor—all combined to place her on the pinnacle of public endearment. Her sincere and conscientious ways won for her a place that none other can fill.
She was born in Hinckley March 12, 1875, and spent her girlhood on her father’s farm near Hinckley. Her schooling was attained in Hinckley, after leaving the Foster District; at the Jennings Seminary in Aurora, Northwestern Academy, and later graduating from the Chicago Training School for Deaconesses. She taught school in Hinckley and Sycamore in this county, and also in Iowa and in Chicago. Finally she entered the special work of a deaconess, working among the mission poor in San Francisco and Oakland, CA, and in Chicago, where she passed away, and was found when a lady collector came to her rooms, and made entrance only by breaking in the door.
Saturday evening the body was brought home, and the funeral was held from the Methodist Church Monday afternoon, Rev. W. W. Diehl officiating.
A large gathering of friends and relatives were present to show their esteem and love for the departed, and to console the grieving parents, who survive her, with her brother, Harry Coulson of Denver, CO, and her sister, Mrs. H. L. Allen of Laurens, IA.
The bearers were H. J. Wilcox, A. W. Hubbard, Ed Ashton, Milton Beitel, Will Cheney and John Jones. HR 12/21/1911

Elizabeth Sisson 1911.12.20
The death of Mrs. Elizabeth Sisson Monday evening (December 18, 1911) at the St. Charles Hospital, Aurora, cast a gloom over this place Tuesday. Her health had not been the best for several months, and three weeks ago she was taken worse and an abscess became noticeable in her right side. She was taken to the hospital Thursday and an operation performed. There was much hope until she took pneumonia and she soon passed away. Relatives were summoned from here and her daughter, Myrtle Waterman, arrived home from California just to part again. She is one who will be missed. Her life had been one of continual helpfulness in the community, in the church and in her family household.
As a mother and stepmother her children will mourn, but her work is ended. She leaves two daughters, one step-daughter and son and husband. HR 12/21/1911

William H. Menk 1912.01.06
Mr. W. H. Menk died Thursday afternoon (January 4, 1912) at his home after several months of illness. He leaves five sons and one daughter, besides his wife and a large circle of friends to mourn his loss. He has been in the hardware business here for a number of years. The funeral was held Sunday at the German Church at one o’clock and the burial was in Greenwood Cemetery.
——————
Just as we go to press late Thursday evening (January 4, 1912), the sad word comes that Mr. W. H. Menk, the oldest active merchant in Hinckley has passed away.
For many months he has been seriously ill, and several times his children have been called home, expecting the final summons, but each time he has rallied.
Particulars of the funeral are not available at this time. All the children have been notified, and the family will announce the date of the service later.
He has been one of the leading merchants in Hinckley for many year, has accumulated a goodly fortune, and has a host of friends who grieve with the family in his passing away.
HR 1/4/1912
——————-
The passing away of William H. Menk of Hinckley, which was briefly chronicled in this paper at a late hour last Thursday, brought to a close a long and busy life of one of our most prominent business men, and a man of sterling personal qualities. With the exception of H. D. Wagner, Mr. Menk was the oldest business man on the street at the time of his death, and he was the oldest merchant in the vicinity, Mr. Wagner being in the banking business.
The story of his life is one of frugality, patience and honest labor. Coming to this country from Germany in 1867 empty handed, he started his American career at Sandwich. He had no money but he possessed that far greater wealth—a strong active body and two willing hands. He tried several parts of the United States before permanently locating in Hinckley, all the time rapidly assuming the customs and notions and language of the new people with whom he had come to spend his life.
During the past six months, Mr. Menk had been ailing. Several tines his sickness became so alarming that the children were called home, and at any moment he was expected to answer the final summons. His iron constitution always helped to bring about a rally, and Thursday, the day of his death, he seemed to be in better health and spirits than he had been for many weeks. The end came suddenly. He went peacefully to a reward that he has richly earned.
In looking up the data of his life we are glad to take the following paragraphs from “The Past and Present of DeKalb County,” which gives a very accurate account of his life since his birth in the old fatherland:
“His birth occurred in Arborn, Nassau, Germany, December 26, 1841. His parents were William and Christina (Steindorf) Menk, who were likewise, natives of the fatherland, the former born March 6, 1806, and the latter in 1812. The mother’s death occurred in 1859, while Mr. Menk passed away March 8, 1892. He was a prominent educator in Germany for fifty three years. In celebrating his fiftieth year as a teacher, he received a gold medal from the King of Prussia, and the occasion was made one of general rejoicing, all the teachers and superintendents, of the province being present.”
“William H. Menk spent the first two decades of his life in his native country, and in 1867 came to DeKalb County, locating in Sandwich, where he lived for a year. He afterward removed to Chicago, where he spent one year, and thence went to Blair, NE, where he lived for five years, working at the tinner’s trade. Thence he moved to St. Louis, MO, and then to Indianapolis, finally in 1875 coming to Hinckley, where he has since been located.”
“He was married November 19, 1876 to Miss Johanna Behring, who was also a native of the fatherland, being born in Hessen, November 18, 1853. To them were born six children, all of whom are living—Rudolph W., Albert G., William F., Frank C., Paul H., and Ida E. Menk.’
Ever since his naturalization as an American citizen, Mr. Menk had been a stalwart Republican. He served two years as mayor of Hinckley, and in all served about twelve years as a member of the board. For many years he has been a member of the St.; Paul’s German Evangelical Church, where the funeral occurred Sunday afternoon, conducted by Pastor Hoeffer, assisted by Pastor Cadwallader of Chicago. He has been a church officer also for many years, and was always constant and loyal in his duties to the church.
Many friends and relatives gathered at the church Sunday to show their esteem and love for him who had passed away. The church choir gave the music, and the bearers were August Reimsnider, Ed Stahl, Henry Weddige, Conrad Wilkening, Herman Bushbaum and William Von Ohlen, all old lifelong friends of the deceased. Interment was in Greenwood Cemetery. HR 1/11/1912

Son Goodall 1912.01.07
The little son of Charles Goodall, the Miller at Cortland, was fatally injured by being run over by a train on the Cortland-Sycamore branch of the Northwestern Saturday morning (January 6, 1912), and died an hour or so later at the Sycamore Hospital.
The accident occurred shortly before eight o’clock in the morning as the unfortunate little fellow was going to school. He failed to see the Sycamore train, which was backing up on the track from the station and the rear end of the last car of the string struck him and knocked him to the rails. Several of the wheels passed over the body of the little fellow, severing one of his arms and one of his legs. He was taken to the hospital at Sycamore where he died.
——————–
A heart rending accident, resulting in the death of a little seven year old boy, occurred at Cortland Thursday morning (January 4, 1912). The victim was the son of Charles Goodall, who runs the Cortland Mill.
As near as can be learned, the little boy started across the Northwestern right of way on his way to school. The Sycamore passenger had just switched a car onto a Chicago train and was backing again to the depot.
The little fellow started across the tracks, not seeing the backing train right at hand, and before the brakeman could warn him, had been knocked down and the wheels of the car passed over the little form. He was immediately placed aboard the train and hurried to Sycamore and rushed to the hospital in an effort to save his life, but the shock and severity of the injuries brought on his death an hour later.
The grief stricken parents have the sympathy of the community in this sad hour. About a year ago they lost another son by an accident, and the heavy hand of death seems to be raised against the bereaved parents.—Sycamore Tribune
HR 1/11/1911

John A. Greene 1912.01.22
John A. Greene, one of the oldest settlers of DeKalb County and a veteran of the Civil War, died at his home in Waterman, Saturday morning (January 28, 1912) at five o’clock, aged sixty nine years. He is survived by his wife and four children, Mrs. Leota Greene Murray, of Waterman, Mrs. Nora Greene Smith, of Battle Creek, MI, Dollie and H. Carl Greene, of Waterman.
——————-
At the Methodist Church Monday, occurred the funeral of John A. Greene, Rev. W. H. Otjen and Rev. George Dunlap assisting Rev. E. J. Aiken, who had charge of the service and who delivered the address. Music was furnished by Guy Matteson and Miss Hipple, with Miss Mertis Garner accompanying on the piano.
Comrades A. U. Fuller, W. S. Andrews, A. C. Kauffman, Anthony Darling, William Wiltberger and Darling Starry were the bearers.
John A. Greene was born November 19, 1843, at Watertown, NY, and died at his home in Waterman, January 27, 1912, after being afflicted several weeks with heart disease. When four years old he moved with his parents to a farm south of town where he grew to manhood. At nineteen years of age he enlisted in company K, 105th Illinois Volunteers, in the Civil War. He was confined in a hospital for a month before he received his discharge.
In 1873 he was united in marriage to Carrie Waterman, a niece of D. B. Waterman, a character well known by pioneer settlers at this place, who, with four children—Mrs. J. J. Murray, recently of Hooker, OK; Mrs. Nora Smith of Battle Creek, MI; Dolly and Carl, mourn his departure. Also surviving him are five grandchildren, one brother in Scranton, IA, and one sister at Humboldt, NE. interment was at Johnson Grove Cemetery.
HR 2/1/1912

William Lafferty 1912.01.25
Mrs. S. B. Ward received word this morning that her cousin, William Lafferty, yard master of the Burlington at Mendota, had been killed while on duty last night (January 17, 1912).
HR 1/18/1912

Baie Baby 1912.01.26
Friends of Mr. and Mrs. Ferdinand Baie sympathize with them over the loss of a little baby which died this morning, aged but one day. The little one is being laid to rest this afternoon.
HR 1/18/1912

James L. Clark 1912.01.27
Many local friends extend their sympathy to John H. Clark of the lumber and coal firm, in the recent death of his father, the Rev. James L. Clark, who passed away at his Sycamore home last Saturday. Mr. Clark had been ailing since last fall, and a wide circle of lifelong friends and acquaintances grieve over the death of this good man. In speaking of Mr. Clark, the Sycamore Republican says:
Rev. James L. Clark, for many years a resident of this vicinity, died at his home on East State Street in this city Saturday last, January 13, 1912. He had been in good health until November 1910. He had been confined to the house for about two months. His death was attributed to creeping paralysis.
James L. Clark was born in the north of Ireland January 1, 1837, and with his parents, Nathaniel and Mary Ann (Fleming) Clark, came to this country when the son was less than one year of age. In 1842, the family became residents of LaSalle County, and in the fall of 1863 removed to Somonauk. The son, James, attended Wheaton College for several years, and later taught school in DeKalb and LaSalle Counties for nine winters, working his farm during the summers.
In 1860 in LaSalle County, Mr. Clark was married to Martha Henderson, whose parents came from Kentucky and settled in LaSalle County, in the early forties, and who conducted a station of the “underground railroad.”
Mr. Clark commenced preaching in 1867, and continued in this calling until the fall of 1910 when he removed to Sycamore. He was an ardent worker for the Wesleyn Church, and was president of the conference for several years. His first charge was at Kishwaukee and Brush Point, west of Sycamore, and his last charge was at Kishwaukee. Mr. Clark in 1876 bought what was known as the Dunmore farm in Mayfield Township, west of Sycamore, which he conducted for nearly 20 years.
Mr. Clark leaves surviving, his wife and their five children: Victor I. Clark, senior member of the North Side Lumber Company of Sycamore; James M., a farmer near Kingston; John H., of Pogue Brothers, lumber dealers of Hinckley; Mrs. May E. Dresser of Wheaton and Arthur J., with a Chicago lumber company. A brother of Mr. Clark resides in Steile, ND.
One who has known him long and well has said: “James L. Clark lived for others. Only those who knew him well knew of the self-sacrificing life he lived or how gladly he carried the message of consolation to sorrowing hearts and the message of salvation to perishing souls. During his last illness, he enjoyed family worship, as in former times, and he led in prayer while lying in bed after the reading of The Word by his faithful, loving companion.”
The funeral services were held at the home of Victor I. Clark,
Tuesday morning and were conducted by Rev. J. P. Brushingham, pastor of the Methodist Church, assisted by Rev. William Pinkney of Sterling, a dear friend of the deceased. The remains were interred in Brush Point Cemetery. HR 1/18/1912

Mrs. Aileen 1912.01.28
Amil Aileen was summoned to Aurora Monday morning (January 22, 1912) by the death of his mother, at the Aurora Hospital. Mrs. Aileen’s home was in Maple Park, where the family had lived for years. She had been sick for several months, and as a last resort, was taken to the hospital in the hope of recovering her health. She leaves a large family of children and her husband to mourn her departure, and friends here extend their sympathy in this sad hour. HR 1/25/1912

J. G. Miller 1912.01.29
Word was received by Mrs. U. V. Welton of Hinckley that her brother, J. G. Miller of Two Harbors, MN, had passed away Saturday night (January 27, 1912), after a brief illness.
Mr. Miller was a son of Antone Miller, one of the pioneer merchants of Oswego, and that was Mr. Miller’s home town for many years. He was a schoolmate of ex-sheriff Voss, the Cherry boys , and others of the well known Oswego families. After moving to Minnesota, he became identified with the leading branch of the Republican Party, and for years under Governor VanZandt, served as a member of the Railroad and Warehouse Commission. Mr. and Mrs. Welton were unable to attend the funeral, and her friends here extend sympathy in her loss. Mr. Miller was born in 1868. HR 2/1/1912

Philip Carl Biehl 1912.01.30
Philip Carl Biehl died at the home of his daughter, Mrs. N. Lodge at Naperville, January 24, 1912, age 92 years, 5 months and 2 days; born at Weidheim, Duchy of Odenberg, Germany, April 22, 1819, and was married to Henrietta M. J. Seibert in 1839. To them were born three boys and one girl, one boy dying at the age of four years. In 1854 they came to America and settled at Albany, NY, where they resided for twenty three years; came to Hinckley in 1877, where he was superintendent of Soflisburg & Kerr’s Tile yard for several years. He then went to Millington where his wife died at 74 years of age. He then made his home with his daughter at Naperville.
The funeral was held Friday at the house and Saturday the remains were laid to rest in Greenwood Cemetery at Millington, Rev. H. E. Mueller officiating. The pall bearers were six of his grandsons. He leaves one daughter, Mrs. N. lodge of Naperville; one son, Jacob Biehl of Hinckley; thirty one grandchildren, twenty nine great grandchildren and four great great grandchildren. Those from a distance who attended the funeral were Mrs. Anna Russell and son, Will of New York; Miss Henreitta Palm and Brother Ervin and Mrs. Roy Skinner of Chicago; Miss Carrie Lodge of Evanston; Mark Biehl of DeKalb; Mrs. Henry Erhardt of Aurora; Miss Minnie Lodge of Bloomington; Henry Smith and Elmer Biehl of Plano; Mr. and Mrs. Jacob Biehl; LeRoy and Arthur Biehl, Mrs. Charles Biehl, Augusta, Rose and Ervin Biehl, Mr. and Mrs. Fred Biehl of Hinckley. HR 2/1/1912

Selma Larson Ahlin 1912.01.31
Mrs. Selma Ahlin, (nee Larson), born in Sweden February 5, 1863, died January 22, 1912. She came to America in 1884, and resided in Illinois since. February 5, 1884, she was married to Gus Ahlin. Eight children blessed their home, seven of whom are living, Albert, Oscar, William, Edith Rose and John of Maple Park and Amel of Hinckley. One child died in infancy. Mrs. Ahlin was a member of the Lutheran Church, having been confirmed in early girlhood, in her native land. She was a member of the Royal Neighbor Lodge. Lodge members acted as escort to and from the church and paid their last respects by depositing a carnation, the flower of their order, on the casket at the church. Rev. Knapp officiated. Mrs. Knapp sang several solos. Interment was at the Gardener Cemetery. HR 2/1/1912

Peter Bish 1912.01.32
Just as the fire bell was ringing Wednesday night, January 31, 1912, one of Hinckley’s most esteemed residents passed away at his home—Mr. Peter Bish. He was born at Pittston, PA, February 2, 1839, and came to Squaw Grove Township when he was sixteen years old, with his parents. His parents were natives of Germany. In the family were five brothers and three sisters, and all that survive Mr. Bish are one brother and one sister.
March 26, 1858 Mr. Bish was married to Sarah Ann Albee, and they settled on the farm in Squaw Grove, where they lived until they moved to town in April 1900, it being just forty two years to a day since they first moved onto the farm. He was one of the best of men—conscientious, law abiding, God fearing of a man who proved himself to be a splendid neighbor and home man—and ideal citizen. His pleasant salutations will be missed by those who have been about to meet him every day.
Five children—Mary, Louise, Lewis, Faith, and Charles are left to mourn his loss, and there are also seven grandchildren.
The funeral was held Saturday at the house, with Rev. W. W. Diehl of the Methodist Church in charge. The bearers were all members of the family—Charles Bish, Louis Bish, J. C. Dienst, William Herald, Elvin Bish, and Arthur Dienst.
Among those present from a distance were:
Lewis Bish, Newton, IA,; W. H. Albee, Elkhart, IA; B. C. Albee, Vernon, MI; Mrs. Electa Wright, Phoebe Albee, A. G. Meeks, Mr. and Mrs. E. B. Meeks, Mrs. Frank Wright and Mrs. Albert Herald, Aurora; Casper Pfeiffer, Zion City; Mr. and Mrs. George Kiehl, Mr. and Mrs. Fred Whitman, Sandwich; S. D. Hunt and Mr. and Mrs. L. Bastian, Kaneville.
Interment was in Greenwood Cemetery. HR 2/8/1912

Ralph Russell Brown 1912.02.01
Ralph Brown died last night (February 7, 1912) at about half past eight at the Greeley East Side Hospital in Waterman, where he had been for a year and a half because of ill health. He was a well known resident of Waterman and had a wide acquaintance throughout the county.
Though an invalid for years, his death came suddenly. Mrs. Brown was attending church services when his death was announced.
——————–
Just before going to press word was received of the death of R. R. Brown of Waterman, who has been an inmate at the Greeley Hospital for about fifteen months. Mr. Brown was one of the leading men of Clinton Township. He was born on a farm south of town, and for many years was recognized as one of the very best citizens of the community. He was fifty eight years of age, and during the latter part of his life he was unfortunately afflicted, requiring almost the constant attendance of his fellow man. He passed away about 8 o’clock.
Mr. Brown leaves a wide circle of friends and acquaintances who mourn the passing away of this good man, and members of the family surviving him are two brothers and two sisters—Grant and Fred Brown and Mrs. Henry Lamb and Mrs. Avery Case.
The funeral will be held from the home Saturday morning at 11 o’clock. Owing to accommodations the body will lie in state from 9 to 11 a.m., Saturday, so that any who may wish to do so may view the remains. HR 2/8/1912
—————
In the passing of R. R. Brown, a practical, useful life has finished the course. So round, full and complete was his work that years cannot remove memory’s imprint from those who came in contact with him.
Ralph Russell Brown was born October 7, 1853, on a farm four miles south of Waterman and died February 7, 1912 from a nervous disorder of which he suffered for five years. He was a self made man, advanced with the times, a natural student and thorough in business. February 18, 1880 he was united in marriage to Margaret A. Beveridge by Dr. Kennedy, pastor of the Somonauk United Presbyterian Church, who with one daughter, Bess B., mourn his loss.
During the past year both have labored faithfully to fill in the time that it might pass more quickly. Two brothers, Fred A. of Waterman and Grant C. of Sterling, CO, and one sister, Mrs. Grace Case of Aurora, also survive; At thirty five he gave up the work on the farm, built a bank and residence, and with H. H. Roberts successfully carried on a private banking business. He served Clinton Township as assessor, was president of the school board and was prominent as a citizen in everything where the community was to be benefited.
The late home was filled Saturday at eleven o’clock with sympathizing friends. Rev. W. H. Otjen of the Methodist Church delivered a brief address with Rev. George Dunlap of the Presbyterian Church assisting. Beautiful flowers, silent tokens of esteem, were in profusion. The singing was exceptionally fine and many minds turned back to when Mr. Brown had appeared in this same service for others. Miss Hipple sang a solo; also a duet with Corydon Tallman; a male quartet—F. H. Giles, F. S. Greeley, C. E. Tallman and Bryce Ferguson—had the closing number, with Miss Mertis Garner playing the accompaniments. H. H. Roberts, James Patten, Grant Brown, William Richmond, Ralph Howison and Al Wright were the bearers.
Those attending from out of town were: G. C. Brown and wife, Sterling, CO; Morris P. Brown and daughter, Mrs. Grace Gordon of Aurora; Mrs. Will Beveridge and two daughters, Eleanor and Elizabeth, and son Tom Beveridge, Sandwich; James Patten and wife, Will A. Browne, Evanston; Mrs. C. Jefferson, E. Havens and wife and daughter, Sadie, also a sister, A. S. Wright and wife of Chicago; Mr. and Mrs. John Harper, Paw Paw; Dwight Richardson, Aurora; Mr. and Mrs. Charles Dewey, Archie Kennedy, Tom Kennedy, Miss Jean Richmond, DeKalb; Ralph Roberts, Sycamore; Charles White, Somonauk; Mr. and Mrs. Ralph Howison, Sandwich; Tom Roberts, Evanston.
Interment was at Oak Mound Cemetery. The funeral party made the trip in autos. HR 2/15/1911

Henry Lange 1912.02.16
About nine thirty o’clock Friday morning, William Klotz went to the room of his brother-in-law, Henry Lange, and found the latter in a sitting posture on the floor of his room, with his head leering forward against the dresser, as if he had arisen from his bed, and calmly sat down and assumed the position. There were no marks or bruises to denote a hard fall, and the diagnosis of the physicians was apoplexy. He was unconscious when found and remained in a state of coma until his death, at 3:30 Tuesday morning, February 13, 1912.
Henry Lange was born on a farm near Sandwich November 8, 1863, and about ten years of his life was spent in Sandwich. He moved to Hinckley about eight years ago, and has been widely acquainted here, especially among the farmers who patronized the tie barn in which he was financially interested. He had not been sick previous to his demise, with the exception of a slight attack of the grip a few weeks ago, and the evening before he was stricken he appeared to be in even better health and spirits than usual. He retired at his usual hour, and it was not until he failed to appear downstairs the next morning that the investigation led to finding him unconscious in his home.
The funeral is being held this afternoon from the St. Paul Church, with Pastor Hoeffer in charge. The bearers are George Dienst, August Klotz, Edgar Foster, Abe Hemenway, August Baie and Oscar Ramer.
Mr. Lange leaves two sisters—Mrs. Will Klotz and Mrs. George Hage. Since living in Hinckley he has made his home with the former. HR 2/15/1912

Daniel Starry, Jr. 1912.02.17
The remains of Daniel Starry, Jr. were brought to Waterman Monday morning from McIntyre, IA. At one o’clock Tuesday a funeral service was held at the home of his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Dan Starry, Rev. George Dunlap officiating. Misses Sarah McFarlane and Ivy Fearon sang, with Miss Andrews accompanying. Burial was at Johnson Grove Cemetery.
Daniel Starry was born October 16, 1862 in Perry County, PA, and died February 11, 1912 at his western home, where he moved less than a year ago. At the age of five years his parents moved to Illinois, where he has lived with the exception of the year past. He was married to Sophia Carlson, who with eight children survive him. He also leaves besides his parents, four sisters—Mrs.. Charles Ames of Shabbona, Mrs. Myron Ames of DeKalb, and Mesdames Frank Breeding and Everett Wilson of Waterman; two brothers—William and Henry. The following friends from Aurora attended the service—Frank Carlson, Mesdames William VanDuzen, Johnson, and Jacobson, and Misses Luella Starry and Jacobson. HR 2/15/1912

Frank Van Vleet 1912.02.18
The saddest accident our people have met with in years occurred Tuesday morning (February 20, 1912) at the Dugan crossing, between Big Rock and Sugar Grove, when the morning passenger train struck the team and wagon driven by Frank Van Vleet, killing him and the two horses and demolishing the wagon.
November 29, last, the young man, who is but twenty five years of age, was married to Miss Eva Weiss, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John Weiss, formerly of Hinckley. The bride was born and raised and educated here, and has a number of relatives here. They have been living with her parents in Aurora since the marriage, and were preparing to go to farming on the Devine farm north of Hinckley. For several days Mr. Van Vleet had been here at the home of his brother-in-law, Will Weiss, getting things together, buying his farming implements, etc, and doing everything necessary at this time of the year preparatory to moving into the new home on the farm.
Monday night he was talking with his young wife over the phone, telling her of his plans to arise early the next morning and drive to Aurora for a load of household goods. She agreed to be “waiting” for him the next morning when he should arrive in Aurora. She waited but her husband did not arrive alive. Instead came the terrible news of the tragic death at the railroad crossing.
Tuesday morning Frank started for Aurora, leaving home about seven o’clock. One of the horses Frank had purchased for his wife to drive after they moved to the farm. The other belonged to Will Weiss, as well as the wagon.
Railroad men and friends are almost at a loss to account for the tragedy. The Dugan crossing is not considered a “bad” crossing by those who drive the roads frequently. True, the highway crosses the tracks at an oblique angle, but there is a distance of at least a half mile either way which gives a full view of any approaching t rains. It is believed that Frank must have been slightly sleepy from the early drive in the morning, and with his fur cap pulled down and his heavy fur collar turned up, did not notice the train at all until the terrible impact came. At the inquest the trainmen stated that they didn’t see the team and wagon until it was struck by the engine.
At this particular point the train was going at a great rate of speed. It was late Tuesday morning, and after leaving the Big Rock depot, endeavored to make up time as usual. The contact, when the team was struck was plainly noticeable to passengers in the train, and as the train whizzed past the gruesome sight of the dead horses, demolished wagon, and the sight of the young man’s body, many of the passengers became hysterical, realizing that at least one life had been taken.
Engineer Abrahamson brought his train to a stop some twenty roods east of the spot where the victim was struck, and backed up. Several men passengers got off and attempted to identify the body, but could not. The remains were carefully picked up, and put in the express car and taken to Aurora, and after considerable telephoning to Hinckley the identification was established, and later verified by relatives in Aurora.
Among the Hinckley people on the train were H. D. Wagner,
Ernest Peckman, Mrs. Charles Leifheit, Mrs. R. D Chappell, Mrs. Pauline Granart and several others, who could not identify Mr. Van Vleet at the time of the accident.
The funeral is being held from the home in Aurora today (Thursday) and many from here will be in attendance. The sincerest sympathy of this community is extended to the young bride and the relatives of the deceased. It is a terrible blow and one that time only can assuage. HR 2/22/1912

George W. Lambing 1912.02.19
The Kansas Optimist, under date of February 22, publishes the following article concerning the life and death of George W. Lambing, who left Waterman a year or so ago to see some more of the world. He was a quiet, modest gentleman of the old school, a Civil War Veteran, and one who was admired and respected by the village people. The Optomist Says:
George W. Lambing, who came to Jamestown about a year ago, died at his home in the west part of the city, Saturday evening, February 17, 1912, after an illness of six weeks or more. Death was caused by valvular heart disease.
Mr. Lambing was a blacksmith and had worked at the trade for more than fifty years. He was following that line of work when he enlisted in the Union Army during the Civil War and since that time has worked at his trade continuously. About a year ago he moved to Jamestown from Illinois and opened up a shop with the intention of doing light repair work and wood work. His health began to fail him early last fall and about the first of the year he was forced to give up work altogether. From that time he grew steadily weaker. All of the children were at his bedside at the time of his death, with the exception of one son who lives in Chicago and who was unable to reach Jamestown before Monday.
He leaves his wife and five children, four sons and one daughter—Charles O. Lambing of Abilene; George E. Lambing of Belden, NE; Dr. John H, Lambing, Chicago; Will I. Lambing, Sholes, NE and Mrs. F. M. Cook of Jamestown.
George W. Lambing was born in Jefferson County, PA, June 9, 1842. In 1864 he enlisted in the Union Army and served until the close of the war in Company H of the 199th Pennsylvania Infantry. In the spring of 1869, four years after receiving his discharge, he came west and located first in Platttsmouth, NE, where he began work at the blacksmith trade. Two years later he moved to Weeping Water, NE, where he resided for nineteen years. He was united in marriage November 14, 1871 to Sarah Francis Potter.
Leaving the home in Weeping Water, the family sought a new location and lived in various towns in the eastern part of Nebraska until 1895, when they came to Kansas and located in Abilene. In 1905 he moved to Concordia and opened up a blacksmith shop under the firm name of Lambing & Son, his youngest son, Will, being with him at that time. Two years later, he moved to Waterman, IL, and about a year ago came back to Kansas and located in Jamestown. HR 3/7/1912

Mrs. J. I. Heckman 1912.02.20
News was received here the first of the week, telling of the death of Mrs. J. I. Heckman, wife of Dr. Heckman, former residents of Hinckley. About two years ago Dr. and Mrs. Heckman moved from Hinckley to California, where the doctor had a good position in a hospital. Mrs. Heckman passed away February 18, 1912, and many friends here extend their sympathy. HR 3/7/1912

Jane A. Arnold Farley 1912.03.03
Friday evening at eleven o’clock, Mrs. W. K. Farley, wife of Dr. W. K. Farley, the well known physician, sustained a stroke of paralysis that resulted in her death Sunday night (March 3, 1912) at the same hour.
Friday evening Mrs. Farley, with her husband and her daughter, Mrs. J. K. Lorenzen and husband enjoyed a few hours playing cards, and soon after ten o’clock decided to retire for the night. At that time Mrs. Farley appeared as well as usual.
Dr. Farley was in an adjoining room and soon afterwards he heard his wife breathing unnaturally and he went into the room and found her unconscious. He called Mr. and Mrs. Lorenzen; and Dr. W. H. Durkee, of Fulton, and Dr. D. S. Fairchild, Jr., of Clinton were summoned. Everything possible was done for her relief, but all was in vain.
Mrs. Farley, whose maiden name was Jane A. Arnold, was born April 23, 1855 and on February 17, 1873, was married to Dr. W. K. Farley at Somonauk. Some years later Dr. and Mrs. Farley located in Oregon, IL, where Dr. Farley practiced in his profession, and six years ago they moved to Fulton.
Mrs. Farley leaves her husband, one daughter, Mrs. J. K. Lorenzen, and three brothers, R. T. Arnold, of Fort Scott, KS, H. E. Arnold, of Oregon, IL, and J. W. Arnold, of Rockford.
–Fulton Journal
——————-
Jennie Arnold was born April 23, 1855 at Somonauk, and died March 3, 1912 following a stroke of paralysis at her home in Fulton. February 17, 1871 she became the wife of Dr. W. K. Farley. To them one daughter was born, who will sorely miss the companionship of one who remained young for her sake. For fifteen years Dr. and Mrs. Farley lived in Waterman and they ranked among the best people to whom the town ever gave home. Dr. P. E. N. Greeley bought the Farley home and practice in 1901.
Mrs. Farley’s passing was sudden. During the afternoon she entertained company and mingled with the family until eleven o’clock, the stroke following shortly after, and she lived only forty eight hours. Surviving are her husband and daughter, also a cousin who made her home with them, also three brothers—one at Ft. Scott, KS, one at Rockford and another at Oregon. Interment was at Fulton. HR 3/21/1912

Charles Winne 1912.03.09
As the whistles in the city were calling the laborers from labor to refreshments on Monday, the spirit of Dr. Charles Winne took its flight, and another old veteran had responded to the last call. The loss of his wife in April 1898, was an deplorable one to him, and his decline in health dates from that time. Though failing in health, he was able to get down town and attend to his personal affairs until last fall when he was compelled to remain at the home of his daughter, Mrs. Ira C. Converse, which has been his home since the death of his wife, and where every care an attention was given him.
Charles Winne was born at Leesville, NY, February 23, 1832, and was a son of John C. and Nancy (Abel) Winne, and died March 18, 1912, aged 83 years, and twenty five days. At the age of nine years, bereft of both his parents, he went to make his home with a sister, and spent the subsequent two years in neighboring schools. At the age of fourteen he was apprenticed to a wagon maker and learned the trade, but soon became dissatisfied as he longed for an education. Leaving his bench he started out with this end in view, and followed various lines of work, attending school whenever his finances would permit, and taking an academic course of study at Westfield, NY.
On leaving the Academy, however, he went to New Jersey, where for three years he engaged in teaching school and in 1854 he went south, being employed one year as a teacher in Mississippi. This enabled him to carry out his cherished plan of becoming a member of the medical fraternity and to this end he matriculated in the University of Michigan, where he was graduated from the medical department in the class of 1854. He afterwards settled in Williamstown, MI, where he entered upon the active work of the profession, and a year later moved to Newark, IL, then the thriving village of this vicinity. Here he took up teaching again, but in 1858 once more entered the field of medical and surgery practice, moving to Somonauk, where he remained until 1861.
The country having become involved in the Civil War, Dr. Winne, aroused by a spirit of patriotism, offered his services to the government and joined the Union Army as Assistant Surgeon of the Fifty Fifth Illinois Volunteer Infantry, in which capacity he remained until 1862, when he was appointed Surgeon of the Seventy Seventh Illinois Infantry. He remained at the front with his regiment until the close of the war and his experience was wide and valuable, while his efforts at the same time were of the utmost benefit to the members of his regiment and to other ill and wounded soldiers who came under his care. He acted as surgeon at the permanent hospital at Baton Rouge, LA for six months. He was also senior surgeon of the brigade during much of the time and yet remained continuously with his regiment. Varied and difficult were the professional duties which devolved upon him, for he continued with the Seventy Seventh Illinois at the front, being continuously in the field or on the march, save for the brief period of six months spent at Baton Rough. At the battle of Pleasant Hill, LA, and again at Mansfield, he volunteered to go within the rebel lines and tend the wounded, for surgeons were much needed for such work. The offer was accepted and for ten weeks he had charge of the wounded within the rebel lines at Pleasant Hill, on the expiration of which period, those who needed medical and surgical aid were put aboard transports and sent down the river to the Union lines at Baton Rough. He was often in positions of great danger as well as hardship, but the spirit of the soldier was his and he never faltered in the performance of any duty that would enable him to alleviate the distress and suffering caused by the ravages of war.
His heroism was just as marked and his service just as rigorous as that of any man who carried a gun and faced the enemy in battle line. When the war was over, he returned to DeKalb County and located at Sandwich, where he continued in active practice until 1888. Together with his practice he, with the late Theron Potter conducted a drug store for several years, later buying out his partner and carrying on the same until 1903, when he gave up business cares and sold his business to Ira C. Converse.
In 1861 he was elected supervisor of the old township of Somonauk, a position he resigned upon going to the front. In 1894 he was again elected to the same position. At the division of the township in 1898 he was elected supervisor of Sandwich Township, a place he held until 1911 when Father Time declared he had served long and faithfully, and was deserving of a rest. During his term the question of the building and locating the new court house was brought up. In this memorable fight he was foremost in the settlement of the question and on the floor of the board of supervisors was a prominent figure. He was firm in his belief that the location should not be changed and stood unfaltering by his convictions, and if there is one man in the county more than any other that is entitled to much of the credit of keeping the county seat at Sycamore, that man was Dr. Charles Winne.
His reelection to the office of supervisor at each biennial election without opposition is incontrovertible evidence of his ability, fidelity and the trust in him reposed by the public. He labored earnestly and effectively to further the interest of his own city and his cooperation was given to every movement of the public good.
In 1894 at a meeting of the Grand Army in Sycamore, Dr. Winne was chosen to present before the board of supervisors a resolution asking for an appropriation of $5,000.00, with which to build a soldier’s monument and was made a member of the building committee for that task. He was also a member of the building committee at the time of the erection of the new court house and for one year was chairman of the board of supervisors. He is a member of Meteor Lodge AF & AM, of Sandwich, being taken into the lodge during the war while at home on a furlough, and took great delight and pleasure in attending the meetings when physically able. He was also a member of Sandwich Post, GAR and acted in the capacity of surgeon almost continually from the time of its organization until the time of his death.
He had a wide acquaintance and was a man highly respected by all. He was a great student and reader, and during his leisure moments could invariably be found reading some standard work of writings upon national and world wide questions. As a speaker he had fine command of language and was always in demand at public functions. He is a man whom Sandwich will greatly miss and one who has written his name in the history of the city, township and county.
Dr. Winne was married December 15, 1858 to Miss Rachel Misner at Newark, IL, who had been his faithful companion and helpmate until in April 1898, when she was called to the home above. Five children were born to them, two dying in infancy. Those that survive are Mrs. Nina D. Converse, Mrs. Helen K. Stinson, of Aurora, and Mrs. Grace Hennis.
The funeral services were held on Wednesday afternoon at the first Presbyterian Church, conducted by Rev. D. M. Ogilvie and Dr. J. M. Lewis. Notwithstanding the severe blizzard that was raging, there was a large attendance of friends. Mrs. A. E. Woodward sang two very pretty solos. The impressive GAR burial service was given in the church on account of the snow storm. The following biographical sketch of Dr. Winne’s service in defense of his flag was read by the adjutant of the Post, Charles Frost.
The service was concluded by singing of “America” by the congregation, led by Mrs. Woodward.
The casket was covered with the flag he had offered his life as a sacrifice to protect and keep unsullied and a wealth of beautiful flowers. The remains were taken to Oak Ridge Cemetery and laid to rest beside those of his wife.
The service Dr. Winne gave.
Comrade Charles Winne enlisted in the 55th Reg.. IL Vol. Inf. on November 25, 1861, and was mustered in on December 31, 1861, as 1st Assistant Surgeon, and served as such for about one year. During that time the regiment had its first baptism of war at Shiloh and Petersburg Landing. During this terrible conflict his regiment lost the heaviest of any federal regiment, except the 9th Illinois, losing 1 officer and 51 enlisted men killed and 9 officers and 190 men wounded out of 512 men in line. On December 6, 1862 he was promoted to Surgeon of the 77th IL Inf. and was with that regiment during the battles of Champion Hills, Black River Bridge and the surrender of Vicksburg. In August they went to New Orleans where they camped until October 3 when it was again put on the march up Bayou Teche to Franklin and New Iberia. Then into the Red River and the battle of Sabine Cross Roads, his regiment lost their Lieutenant Colonel, and 176 men killed, wounded and made prisoners, leaving only 125 men for duty.
In August 1864 he was placed in charge of the general field hospital at Baton Rough, LA, where he remained until March 1865, when he again rejoined his regiment. They then went by transport to Mobile Point and remained during the siege and capture of Spanish Fort, Fort Blakely and Mobile. At this point he was again placed in charge of the hospital and remained until July 10, 1865, when his regiment was ordered home to Springfield, IL, and mustered out having served 3 years and nearly 8 months.
Comrade Winne was a charter member of Sandwich Post 510, GAR and during most, if not all, of the time was the post surgeon. At a regular meeting of this Post held October 14, 1911, after a summer’s vacation of the post, he was present and gave the comrades one of his grand and eloquent talks. Those comrades who heard him in that occasion will never forget his words and advice given. This was his valedictory and last meeting with his post. Now that the Supreme Commander has called him, we shal miss him. He was ever ready to assist any of the boys who wore the blue and were needy, and none came to him and went away empty handed.
We who are left will close up the ranks and try and profit by the advice given by our comrade, fully realizing as he did that we are fast approaching the dark and silent river which we all must cross.
Farewell Comrade.
—————–
Dr. Charles Winne of Sandwich died at his recent home Monday of this week (March 18, 1912) after ailing for a long time. The doctor was for many years supervisor from Sandwich Township, and one of the most prominent men in the county. While supervisor he served on the building committee of the courthouse, and also was chairman of the committee having charge of the erection of the shaft to the honor of DeKalb County soldiers, which was erected in the courthouse yard. The funeral was held from the late home yesterday. HR 3/21/1912

Lillian Filkins Burrell 1912.03.14
Lillian Filkins was born in Sandwich, IL, July 26, 1858. Her early life was spent in this city, where she was educated in the public and high schools.
Having prepared herself for the profession of teaching, she followed this line of work in the public schools of Sandwich and of neighboring towns, with much success.
On December 31, 1891, she was married to Mr. Arthur Burrell. To them were born four children, Marguerite, Joseph, Grace and Ivan, who with her husband, survives her.
Mrs. Burrell was a woman of noble Christian character. At the age of 14 years she united with the Methodist Episcopal Church of Sandwich, in which she was a faithful and efficient worker for many years.
About nine years ago she and her husband moved from Sandwich to a farm near Flora, IL, where they lived until the time of her death. In the church in Flora, of which she became a member, she was held in high esteem, and also in the community where she lived.
After a short illness she died on March 28, 1912, in her late home.
The body was brought to Sandwich and the funeral service was held in the home of her brother, Mr. Carl D. Filkins, by Rev. J. Franklin Clancy. Burial was in Oak Ridge Cemetery.
—————–
News was received in Hinckley Sunday of the death of Mrs. Arthur Burrell of Flora, IL. Mrs. Burrell was the step mother of Fred Burrell of Aurora, and many friends here extend their sympathy at this time. The remains were brought to Sandwich and the funeral was held Monday (April 1, 1912). Among those attending was S. B. Ward of Hinckley. HR 4/4/1912

Davy Walters 1912.03.17
The remains of Davy Walters were brought to the Big Rock Cemetery last week from the state of Washington, where he moved from this locality many years ago. Mrs. Walters was a well known character about here for many years. He had a small place in the Big Rock timber about four and a half miles from Hinckley. He went to Washington where he has made his home with his son for many years. He leaves two daughters and one son. HR 3/14/1912

Edwin Hait 1912.03.18
The news that Supervisor Edwin Hait of Franklin Township had committed suicide brought grief to his many friends in this section. Speaking of the tragedy The Chronicle says:
It is thought he went to the barn some time during the early hours, for he was missed at the rising hour of the family. On going to the barn in the rear of his residence, his body was found hanging by a rope which had been thrown over a rafter. The news spread rapidly through the village.
Mr. Hait has not been in the best of health for some time but it was not known that anything of a serious nature was troubling him. His death has cast a deep gloom over the community where he has lived from boyhood days.
Mr. Hait was born on his father’s farm in Franklin Township, December 2, 1853, and grew to manhood there. He received his education in the district school and was a great reader and a self made man. He was united in marriage to Miss Ida J. Rote, a native of that township, December 29, 1875. To this union three children were born, two of which died in infancy. The son Morris, who survives, lives on the home farm in Franklin.
Early in life Mr. Hait began taking active part in politics and has been a firm believer in the policies of the Republican Party from the first. A leader of the party in this locality, he has held the office of Township Supervisor for years and was serving in that capacity at the time of his death.
Among the supervisors, he was well known and respected and his advice was always considered. He held the affairs of his town always at heart and was a friend of the poor for whose interest he was always watchful. He has held the office of school director and has been greatly instrumental in advancing the school interests. He also has served as a member of the village board. He owns one of the finest farms in that township and for years lived upon it. For several years back, however, he has resided in the village of Kirkland. For many years he has been engaged in the livestock business, buying and shipping to the eastern markets and has built up a big business. He is well known all over northern Illinois. HR 3/21/1912

Mary Fuller Abrams 1912.03.19
Mary Fuller Abrams was born April 1, 1875, near Waterman. Her life was lived up to the last four years in this community.
Between 1892 and 1894 she attended school in Aurora, after which teaching school one year near Waterman. Then followed two years of study in the State University of Michigan at Ann Arbor. This was followed by teaching one year in Dundee, three years in Elgin and one year in Waterman.
She joined the Waterman Methodist Church at the age of fourteen, under the pastorate of Rev. John Griswold. She was an active Sunday School teacher, leaving the impress of her Christian character upon the lives of many of the young people of Waterman.
July 20, 1904, she was married to Richard Abrams, going with him to Lawrence, MI, where they resided for three years; came to Chicago in December 1907, where they resided up to the time of her death March 29, 1912.
She leaves one son, Dwight Richard, aged three years. The funeral services were conducted at the home of her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Harvey Fuller, Sunday afternoon, March 31, by the pastor, W. H. Otjen, assisted by Rev. George Dunlap of the Presbyterian Church. The Misses Mabel Hipple and Florence Potter sang.
Deceased was a type of finest womanhood—refined, cultured, vivacious in disposition, hopeful in temperament. Her record as a teacher bespeaks for her more than usual ability. Her interest in this kind of work made the school room under her charge a place of unusual interest, and therefore of intellectual program.
Surviving are her parents; one sister, Miss Carrie Fuller; three brothers, L. G. and D. A. Fuller of Waterman and James Fuller of Madison, WI. HR 4/4/1912

George Ephriam Hobbs 1912.04.01
After being confined to his bed for a number of weeks, Mr. George E. Hobbs died Sunday afternoon at the age of 89 years having been affiliated with the Masonic fraternity for 65 years. Since his coming to Yorkville, where he made his home with his daughter, Mrs. George Mcwhirter, he has been one of the best known Masons in the vicinity. Seldom was a meeting of his lodge without his presence, and he was always cheerful and companionable. Since the middle of the winter Mr. Hobbs has been in poor health. This condition was probably aggravated by a fall that he suffered last fall. However, he was present at some of the meetings during the coldest of the winter. His age bore on him as the winter advanced and his weight of nearly ninety years proved too much for the old gentleman to carry.
Made a Mason in 1847, he has been closely affiliated with the fraternity since being a member of the lodge at Delphi, NY, Sandwich, Hinckley and Yorkville, IL. He was also a member of the Order of the Eastern Star and the Odd Fellows. During this membership he went to California in 1849 and it was interesting to hear him tell of the experiences he had while visiting lodges during his trip. George Ephriam Hobbs was initiated to the Masonic Lodge by Delphi Lodge No 265, Delphi, NY April 14, 1847. He was passed to the Fellowcraft degree two weeks later and on May 12, 1847, he was raised to the Master’s Degree. He was made an Odd Fellow in the same city in 1845 and at the time of his death was a member of the Sandwich lodge.
Mr. Hobbs was born in Andes, Delaware Co., NY May 12, 1823, and died at Yorkville, IL Sunday April 7, 1912. He was the son of Samuel Hobbs and Catherine Williams Hobbs, both of English ancestry, and who both died in 1828, leaving him but a small boy in Delphi. He was married to Jannett P. Aitken October 9, 1848 and from this union are living three children, David A. Hobbs of Hinckley; Harriet Blagg, of Sandwich, and Nettie M. Mcwhirter, of Yorkville, . With the latter he has made his home for the past twelve years with frequent visits to the other children. His wife died April 16, 1883. Eleven grandchildren and two great grandchildren also live to remember the loving attention of their relative.
The funeral service was held from the Judge Mcwirter home in Yorkville Tuesday afternoon with services in charge of Rev. C. D. McCammon of the Methodist Church, with which Mr. Hobbs was associated. The remains were taken to Hinckley for interment, the service being held there on Wednesday.
—Yorkville Record
——————-
Through the courtesy of the Kendall County Record at Yorkville we are privileged to give our readers the following account and portrait of the late George E. Hobbs, father of David Hobbs of Hinckley. The remains were brought to Hinckley yesterday morning and interment was made in the family lot in Greenwood. The record says: (Balance of obituary is as printed above).
HR 4/11/1912

Jerry D. Lutz 1912.04.14
Jerry Lutz, a wealthy farmer living near Kaneville, committed suicide Saturday morning (April 20, 1912). About a year ago Mrs. Lutz died, and brooding over her death unbalanced his mind. The funeral was held Tuesday.
——————
Early Saturday morning Jerry D. Lutz of Kaneville, well known in this county and locality and a long time reader of this paper, committed suicide at his farm home by shooting himself in the head with a small revolver. It was a twenty two calibre, and he shot nine times before accomplishing the awful end. But two of the bullets entered his brain. The others deflected from the skull and lodged in the walls and ceiling of the room.
On the thirtieth of last May, Mr. Lutz’s wife passed away. They had no children, but were devoted companions. The loss of his helpmeet so bore on Mr. Lutz that it was feared he would go violently insane.
Saturday morning he came down stairs in his farm home, where he lived with Mr. and Mrs. Charles Gramley, who worked the farm, and ate his breakfast as usual. It developed at the inquest Sunday, that after he had eaten breakfast he went into one of the rooms on the lower floor and looked at his wife’s picture long and attentively. He then went upstairs, and in a short time Mrs. Gramley heard the first shot. She ran to the barn to notify her husband, and heard several other shots. The Gramleys telephoned for the constable, and for Dr. Marion, but the physician was unable to prolong his life later than noon.
From the appearance of the room, Mr. Lutz must have suffered terrible pain from the shots, as the furniture and walls were bespattered, showing how he had gone from one part of the room to the other, finally subsiding on a large horse blanket that he had folded and laid on the floor. It was necessary for him to reload the revolver after he has discharged the first series of shells.
Mr. Lutz was about fifty five years of age, and a man of splendid character. He was industrious and economical and amassed a fine competency in this world’s good. Many friends greeted him wherever he went in this part of the state and all honored him for his upright manhood. He leaves no children, and the only relatives he has in this country are two brothers and two sisters in Pennsylvania, who came to attend the funeral, which was held Tuesday from the Kaneville Church. Interment was in the Kaneville Cemetery. HR 4/25/1912

Elizabeth Whildin Hall 1912.04.22
Many friends are anxious over the severe illness of Mrs. Stephen A Hall, who has been confined to her home for many days with a serious attack of stomach trouble. The venerable lady is having the best of care at home, and the host of friends in this vicinity sincerely hope there will be a speedy recovery.
Later—Just before going to press we get the word that Mrs. Hall passed away early this morning, about 1:30 o’clock, and her many friends grieve over the sad news.
Mr. Nash informs me that the funeral will be held from the late home Monday at 1:30 p.m., and interment will be made at the Big Rock Cemetery. HR 4/4/1912
——————-
When it was announced last week that Mrs. S. A. Hall had passed away, a wave of grief swept the hearts of those who had known her for so many years. She was a rare woman. Her home had been in this vicinity for so long, and she displayed so many of those pure Welsh qualities of hospitality, generosity and virtue, that she has been at all times a model and ideal of pure womanhood. Her presence will be greatly missed in the former circles in which she lived and moved and the relatives who are left behind will always mourn her departure.
Mr. Elizabeth Hall was born in Montgomeryshire, South Wales December 8, 1834; and died in Squaw Grove Township April 4, 1912.
In 1842 she came to America with her parents, Deacon Jeremiah and Mary Whildin. For several years they remained in the eastern states, coming to Illinois in 1849 and settling in Big Rock.
March 29, 1860 she was united in marriage to Stephen A. Hall of Big Rock, who is left to mourn her death. To Mr. and Mrs. Hall were born five children: Minerva, who died in infancy; Frank A., the oldest child, who died in January 1881; Mrs. Sadie Quinn of Hinckley; Arthur J. Hall of Aurora; Leonard S. Hall of Sugar Grove. One brother of the deceased, Mr. J. C. Whildin of Big Rock, is the only remaining member of the family of twelve children.
The funeral was held from the home Monday afternoon, and the bearers were six nephews of Mrs. Hall.
Mr. Hall and the children wish to express their sincere thanks for the many kindnesses and comforts tendered them by their friends in this sad hour. HR 4/11/1912

Gurdie Wilcox Greeley 1912.04.23
Mrs. Gurdie Greeley died Sunday afternoon, April 7, 1912 at the home of her son, Dr. S. S. Greeley, after a prolonged illness of heart disease.
She was the daughter of Absalom and Wealthy Wilcox, born March 6, 1845 at LeRoy, Bradford County, NY. September 9, 1869 she was married to John F. Greeley who died fifteen years later. To them two sons were born—Eugene Everett, who passed away at the age of three years, and Selwyn Summner.
Waterman has been her home for forty five years. She was an active worker in the Methodist society. She was thoroughly capable in every department of work assigned to her. She was one of those whose left hand and right hand were full of deeds of kindness. She was missed from this community during the two years spent in Aurora and two years at Collinwood, OH.
The funeral service occurred Tuesday afternoon from the M. E. Church, Rev. W.H. Otjen delivering the address. Rollin Fay and Corydon Tallman, Misses Hipple and McFarlane were accompanied as they sang by Miss Garner. Choice flowers were profuse and included a robe of roses thrown across the pearl gray couch casket. Six nephews—George H. Greeley, Robert Fuller, George Darling, Fred Allen, Wilder Potter and Lee Darling were the bearers. Interment was at Clinton Cemetery.
By Mrs. Greeley’s passing, the community has lost a good citizen—a good friend, a good neighbor; and the only son, a good mother. One sister, Mrs. Anthony Darling, and one brother, J. D. Hoagland of Waverly, NY, survive. HR 4/11/1912

Harry Giles 1912.04.24
Saturday Mrs. Emeline Giles was apprised of the death of her grandson, Harry Giles at Oberlin, OH. He was 32 years old, a Waterman product, and was the son of John and Celia Greenwood Giles.
When fourteen years old, he moved with his mother to Oberlin, where he graduated with honor from the college at the age of twenty. Sixteen months ago, while superintendent of the Hinsdale school, he suffered a nervous disorder that demanded immediate rest and change. Following this, an operation was performed. Everything has been done that medical aid advised, and his passing came as s surprise to everybody.
To deeply mourn his departure are a wife and one son now ten years old; also surviving are his mother and grandmother, Mrs. Betsey Greenwood of Oberlin; Mrs. George Webb of Aurora and an uncle, LeRoy Giles, of Waterman. Funeral and interment occurred Monday (April 15, 1912) at his eastern home. HR 4/18/1912

Julia Wheeler Hall 1912.04.25
The remains of Mrs. O. D. Hall were brought here from Chicago Tuesday by her son and wife, Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Hall.
Julia Wheeler was a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. William Wheeler, pioneer settlers of Clinton Township, and was born 63 years ago on a farm south of Waterman. Before her marriage, she taught school. Her death occurred Sunday, April 14, 1912 after a prolonged sickness of cancer of the liver.
She leaves three children—two boys and one daughter; the latter is now living in California. Charles Hall lives in Chicago, where the mother made her home. The brief service at the Johnson Grove Cemetery was conducted by Rev. George Dunlap. Those attending from away were: Mrs. Minnie Patterson and sister, Mrs. Ward, of Chicago, and Mr. and Mrs. C. N. Pritchard and Mrs. Adelade Greenwood of DeKalb.
HR 4/18/1912

John Harvey 1912.04.26
Playmates covered their eyes with their hands and turned their backs to hide from view the horrible death of Master John Harvey, who was struck by train No. 51 Tuesday morning (April 30, 1912). At eleven o’clock the first grade pupils are excused from school; many live across the tracks and among the class was John on his way to take dinner with his aunt, Mrs. William Richmond.
Train No. 50, eastbound, stood upon the siding ready to pull out as soon as No. 51 was in the clear. As the little fellow ran across the side track behind the coach, he found himself in front of engine 51 that was running slowly and he almost was over the main track when struck and instantly killed. John had his seventh birthday April 24, six days ago.
He was the son of Mr. and Mrs. James Harvey who came from Scotland less than three years ago. They reside on one of Wilder Roberts’ farms south of town. Besides his parents, who will miss the active little man, is a sister, two years old. Without any exceptions the accident is the saddest that ever occurred in Waterman. Although hundreds of children have traveled this route for many years, this is the first innocent life lost. Those witnessing the terrible ordeal hurried to the scene and carried the remains to the undertaking rooms of A. J. Heeg, where an inquest was held Wednesday. No definite arrangements have been decided about the funeral, but presumably same will occur today (Thursday). HR 5/2/1912

Clifford L. Evans 1912.04.27
Clifford L. Evans, the nine months old son of Mr. and Mrs. Ralph Evans of Laurenz, IA, passed away at the St. Charles Hospital in Aurora, Friday afternoon (April 27, 1912), following an operation, for which he had been brought to the hospital Friday morning.
The little baby was stricken with a telescoping of the intestines, and as the trip to a hospital could be made quicker by coming to Aurora than to any of the Iowa City hospitals, he was brought here by his mother Friday morning. The operation was fruitless and the young life was snuffed out Friday afternoon. It is a great blow to the parents, and their many friends here extend their sincerest sympathy.
The father was notified at once, and he left for the old home in Illinois with the other two children, and the funeral was held from the Hinckley Methodist Church Sunday afternoon, and burial was in Greenwood Cemetery.
Mr.. Evans is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Arch Evans of Hinckley, two of our most prominent residents and old, loyal farmers, and Ralph was born here where he has a host of friends. The mother was an Aurora girl, and in their sorrow the young couple have the heartfelt attention or their many friends, both here and in Aurora.
They desire to express their sincere thanks to the friends and relatives who so kindly assisted them during the bereavement while they were in Illinois.
They left Hinckley Monday morning for their home in Iowa, where Mr. Evans is in the midst of his spring work on the farm. They will miss the little youngster, but time alone will assuage the grief, and those who are left to them will be the more precious for this affliction. HR 5/2/1912

John Wilson 1912.05.19
Word was received in Hinckley yesterday (May 1, 1912) of the death of John Wilson, a former night operator for the Burlington at the Hinckley depot. Deceased had been in the sanitarium at Elgin for some time, his mind having given way under the strain of heavy work after he left the Burlington service, and was at the head of the rate department of the Rockford Manufacturers’ Association, where his home was located. While in Hinckley, Mr. Wilson was married to Miss Alta Kuter. He lived here for several years and had a host of friends here who regret his early demise. He was about thirty eight years of age. HR 5/2/1912

Henrietta Soldow Dannewitz 1912.06.09
Mrs. Henrietta Dannewitz departed this life Sunday morning (June 23, 1912) at the home of her daughter near Waterman. Deceased had not been in the best of health for some time and her oldest daughter, Mrs. Rose Baie thought by taking her to her home the change might do her good and three weeks ago last Tuesday Mrs. Baie took her to her home near Waterman but not withstanding all was done for the benefit of her health and after a lingering illness with paralysis, a weak heart and other complications, she peacefully passed away last Sunday morning at 4:30 o’clock.
She was born at Britz, Mecklenburg, Schwerin, Germany, April 20, 1842, being 69 years, 9 months and 27 days old at the time of her death. Henrietta Soldow came to America in 1865 with her parents and always made her home in Somonauk or vicinity. In 1866 she was united in marriage to Phillip Dannewitz and to this union were born four boys and three girls, all of whom are living: Edward, Frederick, John and Albert and Mrs. Rose Dale, Mrs. Matilda Klaas and Mrs. Henrietta Setizinger, who, with her husband are left to mourn her loss. In 1893 she, with her husband, decided to quit farming and they moved to Somonauk, where they came to enjoy the fruits of their labors. Mrs. Dannewitz was a good wife and a kind and loving mother and was ever ready and willing to do all in her power to assist a neighbor or friend.
The funeral services were held at the German Lutheran Church Tuesday afternoon at 1:30 o’clock, services being conducted by Rev. F. Suhren and the remains were laid at rest in Oak Ridge Cemetery. Besides the many relatives and friends around Somonauk the following from out of town were in attendance at the funeral: Messrs. and Mesdames August, Charles, Fred and George Reiminsnider, Arvit VonOhlen, Fred Bender, Edward Stahl, Richard Stahl, Herman Baie, Mrs. C. Baie, Rhinard Stahl, Carl Baie and William VonOhlen, Hinckley, Frank Skelly, Kaneville, Rudolph Menk and wife, Joliet, and Henry and Emil Dannewitz, Sandwich, Charles Dannewitz and wife Plano.
In Memory of Mrs. Dannewitz
As we gather at the table,
And watch each smiling face,
The heart fills with emotion
To see the vacant place.
We may strive to hide our longing
In the midst of mirth and fun.
But we’re thinking, thinking, thinking,
Of the loved–the absent one.
When we gather round the fireside
With merry laugh and jest,
How we wish the absent dear one
Was here with all the rest.
Still we join in all the frolics,
But we wish the day was done
For we’re thinking, thinking, thinking,
Of the loved–the absent one.
Yet when the day is over,
And they all have gone to rest,
We feel the Heavenly Father,
Does all things for the best.
So we cheer our drooping spirits,
With the rising of the sun,
But we can’t help thinking, thinking, thinking,
Of the loved–the absent one.
——————-
Mrs. Dannewitz passed away at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Louis Baie, Sunday morning (June 23, 1912), being stricken suddenly at the age of seventy two years. She was the mother of a large family, and was much esteemed by her large circle of friends and neighbors.
The children surviving this good mother are Ed, Fred, John and Albert Dannewitz, and Mrs. Louis Baie, Mrs. Matilda Klaas, and Mrs. Hattie Seitzinger.
A large company of sorrowing friends and relatives gathered at the funeral to show their high regard for the deceased.
HR 6/27/1912

Frank Richter 1912.06.17
The following item from the Sycamore Republican tells of the death of Frank (Rooster) Richter, an inmate at the county farm, and a well known character about Hinckley for many years. He went to the county home a couple of years ago. The Republican says:
“Frank Richter, of Hinckley, died Saturday (June 1, 1912) at the county farm where he had been an inmate for several months. His death was caused by a disease of the throat. The visiting committee of the W. C. T. U. who were paying their annual visit to the farm, were in charge of the funeral services which were held Sunday.” HR 6/6/1912

F. E. Curry 1912.06.18
F. E. Curry, well known to a large circle in Waterman and Hinckley, died Sunday, June 9, 1912 at the home of his niece, Mrs. Lida Gillette, at Cortez, CO. He was born 50 years ago at Peakskill, NY, was the son of J. M. Curry and brother to Mrs. August West and Richard Curry of Aurora and Steve Curry of Chicago, and Mrs. A. U. Fuller of Waterman. His illness was of six months duration, and in the form of dropsy. The remains will be brought to Waterman for burial.
When a young man, Mr. Curry founded a weekly paper at Telluride, CO, returning to Aurora in 1890 when he served on the various staffs for the Aurora Democrat, Evening Post, and managed the Aurora News. When he went to Cortez, it was his intention to edit a local paper. He never married but devoted his life to his work and death overtook him while in his prime. Richard Curry is in town at A.U. Fuller’s making the arrangements for burial. HR 6/13/1912

Homer A. Weaver 1912.07.03
Homer A. Weaver died at his residence in Hinckley last week Wednesday evening (July 10, 1912) at about 8:30 o’clock. For many months Mr. Weaver has suffered patiently with a cancerous growth on the side of his neck and while it is regrettable to think of so good a man being taken from his friends and loved ones, still the One who knows best for all mankind has made no error in calling Mr. Weaver. He had a host of friends wherever he was known. He was a conscientious man, his character was noble and uplifting, and he will be missed by a great circle of associates. The funeral services were held Friday afternoon. He was the father of Mrs. John W. Dean, of Sandwich.
—————–
Mr. Homer A. Weaver died at his home in Hinckley last evening (July 10, 1912) about 8:30 o’clock, and as we go to press the funeral arrangements have not yet been made known. For many months Mr. Weaver has suffered patiently with a cancerous growth on the side of his neck, and while it is regrettable to think of so good a man being taken from his friends and loved ones, still the One who knows best for all of mankind has made no error in calling Mr. weaver. He had a host of friends wherever he was known. He was a conscientious man, his character was noble and uplifting and he will be missed in a great circle of associates. HR 7/11/1912
———————-
In last week’s issue a brief notice was contained of the death of Mr. Homer Weaver of Hinckley. He was one of the best man in this township, and for thirty years has been known to a wide circle of confidential friends and associates. He had held official positions, transacted court business, and in many ways has shown his usefulness as a man of business and a public citizen.
Homer Weaver was born in Pennsylvania, January 23, 1853, and came to Illinois with his parents when he was a mere child. January 28, 1873, he was married to Louisa A. Dixon, who has been with him as a faithful wife and mother for these many years, and during his last illness she has been at his side continually, day and night, filling the place that an all-wise Providence had selected for her. Several years of Mr. Weaver’s life were spent on the farm, six miles northwest of Hinckley and from there he moved to the village in 1882, engaging in the lumber business.
He passed away July 10, 1912, in the evening, after an illness of several months from a cancerous affliction, and a host of friends here regret his removal.
Surviving him are his wife, and two daughters—Mrs. Edyth Dean of Sandwich and Mrs. Sylvia Kunkler of Clinton, MO.
HR 7/18/1912

Ida Amelia Bohler Jones 1912.07.14
The many friends of Miss Ida Bohler will be grieved to hear of her death, which occurred early Tuesday morning (July 11, 1912). For some weeks Miss Bohler was a patient at the sanitarium in Elgin, where she was taken in the hope that the treatment would be of benefit to her. A tubercular trouble developed, and her passing away came suddenly, and was a shock to her many friends in Hinckley. She was still a young woman, and it seems hard that ones so fortunately placed in this world must undergo the ills and weaknesses of humanity, but she is now at rest, and time will assuage the grief of those who remain after her. The funeral is being held today with Rev. W. W. Diehl of the Methodist Church in charge. HR 7/11/1912
—————-
Ida Amelia Boller was born in Afton Township, DeKalb County, September 29, 1874. Her parents soon afterward moved to Clinton Township, where the family lived until the father’s death, November 2, 1883. The mother and her two children then moved to Hinckley where they have made their home since 1886.
She took great interest in her school work and graduated from Hinckley in 1889. Thereafter she began teaching, which she pursued for a number of years. When a young girl, she became interested in church work and united with St. Paul’s Evangelical Church at Pierce.
She was married to Edward F. Jones, of Carlton, August 30, 1899, but they soon separated. Being of a nervous disposition, her health soon gave way. Various physicians were consulted, she was placed in several sanitariums, and a trip to California was taken for her health, but these proved of little benefit. After her mother’s death, February 22, 1911, she lived with her aunt, Mrs. Thorel until it became necessary to remove her to the Elgin State Hospital, where she remained until July 8. Realizing her strength was fast waning, she longed to come home, and her wish was granted. She was brought home Monday evening and passed away Tuesday morning July 9, 1912, at 5:25.
She is survived by one brother, Arvie F. Boller, together with a number of relatives and friends of this vicinity.
The funeral was conducted by Rev. Hoefer from her home, and interment was in North Clinton Cemetery. The bearers were Louis Klaas, Rudolph Biehl, Wells Fay, Robert Clark, Archie Dewey and Arthur Hubbard, and music was furnished by the Misses Hilda Morsch, and Stella Wedkemper and Mrs. Mollie Clark. HR 7/18/1912

Harry Claire 1912.08.09
Harry Claire, thirteen years old, of 1006 North Wells Street, Chicago, lost his life in attempting to beat his way on the way freight at Lee last Friday afternoon (August 2, 1912). He and his chum Burk, fifteen years old had walked into Lee a few minutes before the arrival of train No. 92. They had beat their way down to Steward on the C. M. & St. P. from Rockford and were hanging around the railroad yard at Lee, and as the way freight was pulling some empty cars off the back track, young Burk jumped into an empty box car and as young Claire attempted to follow his chum, he stumbled over an ash pile and rolled under the car, one foot was cut off just above the ankle and the other almost three inches below the hip joint. He was placed on passenger train No. 22 and hurried to the hospital at Aurora. The young life went out about thirty minutes after arriving at the hospital.
His parents were immediately notified and came out to Aurora the same evening. Why is it that young boys of this age have to roam over the country as tramps instead of staying at home and not subject themselves to such chances? Had this young lad stayed at home with his parents, his young life might have been spared. This is a warning to young boys who think flipping cars is an easy thing to do. Parents should warn their children often of the danger and also that by keeping away from the depot and railroad tracks and yards, they will avert a similar accident that came to this young boy.
There are some young chaps in Hinckley who make it their business to be down around the depot on arrival and departure of trains when they have no business whatever down there and they are only in the way and subject the employers to watch and keep them away. The railroad company has instructed their station force to keep all boys away from depot and tracks, that have no business whatever around the company’s right of way. Parents can greatly assist the railroad company in enforcing their safety rules. The railroad company looks to safety first. HR 8/8/1912

Robert Brown Howison 1912.08.10
After a long illness, Robert Brown Howison passed away at his home in Waterman Tuesday of last week (August 22, 1912). His funeral was held Thursday from the Presbyterian Church at one o’clock in the afternoon, with Rev. George Dunlap officiating.
Robert Brown Howison was born in Scotland, January 12, 1830. He was the youngest of four sons and two daughters, who came to this country when he was four years old. The family remained in New York for several years and then came to Illinois in 1844.
Mr. Howison married Miss Hannah Ellen Kirkpatrick about forty three years ago, and the family has been on the farm near Waterman until about eight years ago, when they moved to town, where Mr. Howison’s death occurred August 27, 1912.
This is the first break in a happy home. One daughter, Mrs. Margaret Moore, lives at St. Anthony, ID, but the others-two sons and a daughter—remain with the mother in the Waterman home.
Interment was at the Oak Mound Cemetery, near Somonauk.
HR 9/5/1912

James Darnell 1912.09.01
James Darnell passed away this morning (September 5, 1912) at his home here in Plano. He was one of a family of Little Rock’s oldest settlers. He was 77 years old. The funeral will be held Friday at 1:30 p.m., burial in the Plano Cemetery.
—–Plano News
He was a brother of Aaron Darnell, of Sandwich.
——————-
Wednesday morning, September 5, 1912, James Darnell, fifth son of John and Leah Darnell, passed away at his home in Plano.
He was born in a log cabin which time some years ago entirely obliterated, but which was spared long enough to be well remembered by those of middle age. It stood on the south side of the public highway and across the road from the more modern residence on the “Hathaway” farm between Plano and Yorkville.
It is not without considerable effort that one can realize the great changes which have taken place since September 1, 1835, the date of his birth. Illinois had not yet recovered from the fright of the Black Hawk War; there were only twenty four states in the Union; Jackson was president; railroads were in the experimental stage; no telegraph instruments had ever sounded; the opposition to slavery had just been launched by William Lloyd Garrison. It was twenty six years before the breaking out of the Civil War; Chicago was then a town of one thousand inhabitants. His father and mother had only recently left the hills of North Carolina and with four children had made their way across the country to Illinois.
In 1832 Shabbona had warned the few white settlers about the mouth of the Little Rock, Big Rock and Somonauk Creeks and this family, with many others, retired to the fort on the Sandy Creek for protection, and where they remained until after the danger was over.
John Darnell, then took their children and settled, as above stated, in the old log house on the “Hathaway” farm where the subject of this sketch was born. Here they stayed a few months, when they pushed on further west and settled on the farm familiarly known as the “John Darnell” farm, a mile and a half northwest of Plano. Here the father of the large family of ten children lived for about twenty years. He died in 1852 and left his widow, Leah, to care for the large family; but not until some of the children were well grown and besides he left some six hundred acres of land. In 1862 on April 3rd, he was united in marriage with Susannah Taylor, a daughter of the late William Taylor. Later he moved five miles northwest of Hinckley just west of the Hartman Church. Here he resided until 1893 and it was here that they raised a family of four girls: Elizabeth, wife of Albert W. Davis of Big Rock; Anna, wife of Clyde Hall, of Aurora; Jessie, now deceased; and Stella, wife of Owen Hiddleson, of Chicago.
When Mr. and Mrs. Darnell left the farm in 1893, they moved to Plano where they have since resided.
He had been in feeble health for some time, having suffered a stroke of apoplexy three years ago. His death was not unexpected, yet, so well, so wide and so favorably was he known, and so faultless had been his life that his death was a shock to the community in which he had lived for over three quarters of a century. His wife and children, except his daughter, Jessie, survive him.
His funeral was held at his late home in Plano Friday September 6th, Rev. E. L. Meservey of the Methodist Church conducted the services. HR 9/19/1912

Edith Lyle Morton 1912.09.03
Deputy Coroner Jacob Burkhart, Jr. was called out to the home of Mr. and Mrs. Charles Morton, in Victor township to hold an inquest this (Friday) morning (August 30, 1912), over the body of their daughter, Miss Edith Lyle Morton, who committed suicide about 6 o’clock by shooting herself with a shotgun.
It was a gruesome sight that met the eyes of the mother when she went upstairs after hearing the report of the gun. The upper part of her head was blown completely away, pieces of the scalp, and blood and flesh being scattered upon the walls.
Early in the morning after the male members of the family had gone to do the chores, Mrs. Morton went upstairs to see her daughter, who said that her head ached and she would be down in a short time. After her mother had gone downstairs she went across the hall into a room occupied by her brother and secured the gun. Letting it lie upon the bed, she tied a piece of cloth through the trigger guard and to the post of the bed. With the trigger up she grasped the muzzle of the gun and pulled it towards her, receiving the full charge, tearing away the top of her head.
Some ten years ago she gave way under nervous prostration, but until a few months ago seemed to have recovered. Of late she complained of her head aching and that she could not remember as well as she could before.
She would have been 37 years of age October 17, 1912.
The funeral services of Miss Edith L. Morton, an account of whose sudden death was given in last week’s Free Press, were held at the home of her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Charles Morton last Sunday afternoon, conducted by Dr. James M. Lewis, pastor of the Congregational Church, at Sandwich.
The services were largely attended by relatives and friends of Victor. She had a large circle of friends and her beautiful character and sweet disposition had endeared her to all who knew her. Relatively few people are more genuinely loved and more highly esteemed than she was.
The floral offerings were many and very beautiful. Her friends, showing in every possible way, by word and by deed, their regard for her and their sympathy for her parents. An unusually large number of people followed the remains to their last resting place at the Wesson Cemetery.
Miss Morton was 37 years of age, was born in Victor, where her entire life was spent. Her health had not been of the best and her school days were shortened by periods of severe headache reoccurring at intervals during her life. She is survived by her parents, one brother, Harry, who is at home, and one sister, Mrs. Jonas Sawyer, of Victor.
——————-
Seldom in the history of Clinton and Victor Townships has there occurred two tragic deaths that awoke the tender chord of public sentiment as the two deaths of last Friday—within a few hours of each other.
About ten years ago, Miss Edith Lyle Morton, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Charles Morton of Victor Township, about seven miles south of Waterman, wealthy and prosperous farmers, was affected temporarily with a derangement of her mental faculties. For some time she took treatment for the affliction, and gradually regained her normal mental condition. She was supposedly in splendid health this summer.
For several days she had been anticipating with considerable pleasure the visit of lady friends and relatives from the city, and up to within a day or so of her tragic death she had been planning various trips and amusements for her visitors.
Wednesday or Thursday of last week she began to complain of headaches, and Friday morning (August 30, 1912) she told her mother she would return to her room and rest shortly after the morning meal.
Mrs. Morton went to her daughter’s room after part of the home work was finished, and found her daughter lying in bed. The mother returned to the lower part of the house, and heard the report of a gun. Hastening up the stairs and into her daughter’s room, she met a terrible sight. The daughter’s body was lying on the bed, and a smoking shotgun told the terrible story.
The young woman’s head was blown completely off by the discharge of the gun, only a small portion of the face remaining. She had looped a handkerchief through the trigger guard of the gun, hooked the loop over the bed post, then lying down, pulled the gun toward her, thus discharging it. The charge entered the head on the right side, and completely removed it from the shoulders.
The coroner’s jury returned a verdict of suicide while temporary deranged, and a wide circle of friends and relatives extend their sincere sympathy to the home folks in this sad hour.
HR 9/12/1912

Fred N. Allen 1912.09.09
According to information given us by Coroner Morris, Fred N. Allen who was found dead in a corn field near Waterman did not die from the heat but perished as the result of swallowing a quantity of carbolic acid, with suicidal intent.
The first reports were that Allen had died as a result of a sun stroke. With this case of self slaying, the little community of Waterman and vicinity seems to have had more than its share of self destruction.
Allen has been having a lot of ill luck lately and the suicide was probably caused by despondency over his troubles. Some time ago he bought 200 acres of what they call “Dead Indian” land in Oklahoma, this being land that was allotted to the Indians, the lottee of the property turned up and claimed the land. He is also said to have brooded over the raise in the rates of the Woodmen fraternity, of which he was a member.
The fact that the decedent was a suicide was discovered by Officer Scott of the local force, who was on the coroner’s jury. A physician had given the cause of death as sunstroke after a perfunctory examination but the local officer gave the corpse a more rigid examination and discovered the signs of the acid.
Allen leaves a widow and four children, one is a salesman in Chicago, another a member of a thresher outfit crew in Minnesota, a daughter in Oklahoma and one who has been living at home. –Sandwich Free Press September 19, 1912.
——————
Shortly after noon Friday (September 6, 1912) the relatives of Mr. Fred L. Allen were horror-stricken to find his body in the cornfield east of the family home in the north part of Waterman.
Mr. Allen had covered his milk route in the morning as usual; stopping down town and adjusted his Woodman insurance; went to the breakfast table at home, but did not eat heartily; went to the chicken house in the rear yard, and then must have gone to the corn field, where his body was found after the dinner hour by his folks, who became anxious over his prolonged absence.
Physicians were summoned but death had taken place for some time.
For some time Mr. Allen had been worrying over the title to some land in Oklahoma on which he had paid a considerable amount of money. The heat of the past few days had noticeably affected him, and his actions of the last day or so of his life, if strange at all, must be attributed to this cause. The coroner’s jury assembled and returned a verdict in accordance with the facts and the testimony adduced.
Fred L. Allen was born September 30, 1830, in Clinton Township, on the Allen homestead. He was the oldest son and child of Mr. and Mrs. Charles Allen, who survive him, together with his widow, and five children—Mrs. Thomas Talla of Marlow, OK; Ray C. Allen, Miss Beulah Allen, Charles Allen and Miss Marjorie Allen of Waterman.
November 22, 1882, he was married to Miss Ella Sawyer of Clinton Township. His sister, Mrs. May Potter of Waterman, also mourns his loss. With the exception of eight years—between 1897 and 1905—all of his life was spent in Waterman and Clinton Township, and he was highly esteemed and beloved by all who knew him. He was of rare gentleness, ready with hand and heart to help along with any enterprise, public or private, which he thought deserved sympathy and assistance. He was a member of the Methodist Church for many years, and a loyal attendant, and the family altar was an established custom in his home.
The funeral was held Sunday afternoon and a vast gathering of sorrowing friends gathered to confer the last sad rites on the departed. Rev. W. H. Otjen of the Methodist Church had charge of the service. HR 9/12/1912

Jennie Thompson Ziegler 1912.09.17
The funeral of Mrs. Jennie Thompson Ziegler, who passed away at her home in Sandwich Friday, September 6, 1912, was held at the home at nine o’clock Sunday morning. Her remains were brought to Hinckley, followed by a cortege of sorrowing friends and relatives, and burial was in the East Pierce Cemetery by the side of her husband, who died five years ago, Rev. Mr. Messersmith had charge of the services at the grave.
Jennie Thompson was born at Skjeie, Norway, June 14, 1857. After coming to this country she was married in 1895 to Mr. D. F. Ziegler, who preceded her by five years to the great beyond. She suffered with a complication of diseases, still she bore her affliction with patience and fortitude.
She is survived by a brother, Mr. Silas Thompson of Ottawa, and a sister, Mrs. H. W. Frank of Sandwich, besides relatives on the other side of the ocean. HR 9/12/1912

Dudley Reid 1912.09.18
Dudley Reid of Earlville was killed by James Maher of Mendota, in a fight at Earlville Sunday (September 15, 1912). The two men spent the day together at Ottawa and returned to Earlville with a bottle of whiskey. Reid drank the greater portion of the whiskey and when Maher censured him for what he had done, the former challenged him to fight it out and the two men went to it.
Maher hit Reid on the jaw, which knocked him to the ground. As he was on his hands and knees, about to get up, Maher jumped onto his back and hit him with his fists on each temple causing almost instant death.
Maher was placed under arrest and taken to Ottawa and lodged in the county jail on the charge of manslaughter.
HR 9/19/1912

Christ Johnson 1912.09.19
As Mr. Christ Johnson of Kaneville was bending over to fasten his shoe laces Saturday night (September 28, 1912), in preparation for the Big Rock Plowing Match, he was suddenly taken ill, and remarked to his wife that he did not feel well
Almost immediately he yielded to an attack of paralysis, and when Mrs. Johnson had summoned assistance he was unconscious. He regained consciousness for a short time, then lapsed into a state of coma, from which he never recovered. This was the third stroke Mr. Johnson suffered in the past few years, and his demise is greatly regretted by a large number of friends here, where he formerly made his home.
The funeral was held Monday and interment was in the Kaneville Cemetery and there was quite a large attendance of friends from here. He was a member of the Hinckley Woodman and Royal Neighbor Lodges.
Mr. Johnson was born in Tarop, Tyen, Denmark, October 16, 1855. He was married to Miss Catherine Mary Hanson, March 27, 1877, and to them were born two daughters and two sons—Mrs. Hans Sorenson, Miss Mary, Chris, Jr., and John D. Johnson.
June 5, 1881, Mr. Johnson came to Chicago, where he remained a year, then moved to Somonauk, living there until 1892, when he moved to Hinckley. In 1909 he moved to his late home in Kaneville.
The bearers were F. S. Potter, William Owens, Peter Johnson, Ed O’Connell, Chris Nelson and Hans Jensen. Mr. Johnson’’ only relative in this country, aside from his own family, is his brother, Peter Johnson. HR 10/3/1912

Herman C. Hoepner 1912.11.01
After a long and courageous fight, lasting for almost three years, Herman Hoepner died at his home four miles north of Sandwich a little after one o’clock Tuesday (November 26, 1912). Mr. Hoepner was born on the farm on which he died and that had always been his home, 48 years ago. He was the son of Henry and Caroline Hoepner, both of whom were natives of Germany. He, in connection with his brother Albert O., have managed the farm for several years, and he was of the progressive farmers of Sandwich Township. Almost to the day of his death he was laying plans for the future conduct of his farm.
The disease was pernicious anemia. His decline had been gradual but with periods of apparent convalescence since its beginning in December 1909.
He was of a retired disposition not given to much talking, except to those with whom he was well acquainted. By those who knew him was held in unusually high esteem. He was a loyal neighbor, a friend to all and assisted with a glad heart and a willing hand to all who were in need.
His constant attendant during the whole of his long illness was his niece, Miss Amanda Kriete, who for many years has been a member of the Hoepner household. She was untiring in her attendance and devotion by night and by day, a fact realized and appreciated by him and by all the other members of the family.
He is survived by five brothers and one sister, Henry, Mrs. Chas. Tiede, of Hinckley, Louie, George of Chicago and Albert O.
The funeral services will be conducted at his late home Friday at 1:30 p.m. by Dr. J. M. Lewis, of the Congregational Church at Sandwich. The interment is to be at Oak Ridge Cemetery.
——————
Several relatives went from Hinckley Friday to the funeral of Herman Hoepner, who passed away at the home farm north of Sandwich. He was the brother of Mrs. C. W. Tiede, who has made frequent trips to the old home to cheer him and help him in the fight he waged for a continuance of life. In speaking of his demise, the Sandwich Argus says: (Balance of obituary as printed above). HR 12/5/1912

Edwin Fraser 1912.11.08
Edwin Fraser, a retired farmer, and one of the best known residents of Clinton Township, died Thursday, November 7, 1912 at the home of his daughter, Mrs. Edgar Hipple, where he had lived for several years. He was a big farmer and stock feeder. For eighteen months his health has been failing and for five weeks he was confined to his bed.
Edwin Fraser was born May 25, 1835 in Washington County, NY. While a babe three months old, his parents moved to Vermont, where they lived nineteen years. All came to Sandwich in 1854 and settled on a farm near Sandwich. He was a pupil at Jennings Seminary, Aurora, graduating with honor upon reaching his majority. In 1864 he was married to Miss Mary Guth and of this union nine children were born, two boys, Horace and Charles, with the mother, preceding the father in death.
During the forty years Mr. Fraser spent upon his farm south of Waterman he proved a successful stock raiser. He was a student of nature, independent in his views and decided in convictions.
The funeral occurred Saturday afternoon at the country home of Mr. and Mrs. Edgar Hipple, Rev. W. H. Otjen delivering the address. Miss Mabel Hipple and Mrs. F. A. Brown sang and Miss Mertis Garner accompanied on the piano.
The surviving children are: Mrs. Marion Flewellyn and Mrs. Margaret LaPorte of Paw Paw, Harry Fraser and Mrs. Mabel Taylor of Humboldt, IA, Lyman Fraser and Mrs. Sadie Hipple of Waterman. They, with their families and sixteen grandchildren attended this last sad rite. Edwin Fraser, Jr., of Alberta, Canada, was unable to reach here. One sister, Mrs. Margaret Coleman, of Sandwich, also mourns his departure. Interment was at Johnson Grove Cemetery. HR 11/14/1912

John Simpson Kirkpatrick 1912.11.10
The funeral of J. S. Kirkpatrick was held Sunday morning from the Presbyterian Church at Waterman. Every available seat was filled while many remained standing and the rostrum was a bank of flowers. Rev. George Dunlap was called from Chicago to officiate and Rev. W. H. Otjen of the Methodist Church assisted. Misses Ivy Fearon, Sarah McFarlane, Georgia Davenport and Mrs. Will Weber were accompanied in their song by Miss Ruth Andrews. John Smiley, John Weber, W. M. McFarlene and William Richmond were the bearers. A. J. Heeg directed the services, and interment was at Oak Mound Cemetery.
John Simpson Kirkpatrick was born near Duncannon, PA, August 18, 1845, and died November 8, 1912, following an operation. He was the third in a family of five children, all of whom have passed away with the exception of one sister, Mrs. Elisa Owen, of Topeka, KS, who was at her brother’s bedside during his final illness and death.
When seven years of age he moved with his parents to DeKalb County and settled on the farm five miles south and east of Waterman.
December 9, 1875 he was united in marriage to Miss Margaret McCord and to them five children were born, all of whom are living now with the exception of Miss Mertie, who died March 10, 1902, at the age of 25 years. The wife and mother died on April 6, 1892.
Mr. Kirkpatrick was later married to Miss Ida S. Kirkpatrick, who, with the following children, mourn his departure–James Kirkpatrick, on the old homestead, Mrs. Fred Dean, Mt.. Morris, Miss Mabel Kirkpatrick, of DeKalb Normal, Mrs. Harry Noss, of Waterman, and Ross Kirkpatrick of Sandwich. During his 67 years of life, farming was his principal occupation. He was also in the hardware business which he sold in 1905 to Lyman Fraser. Sixteen years ago he built a home in town that his children might enjoy better opportunities in the schools, churches and societies. He cherished his home and was a quiet, reserved and generous man.
For thirty years he was ruling elder of the Presbyterian Church. His exemplary personality and faithfulness will live in the minds of all who knew him. His parting words were, “I am ready, the Lord has given me a long life.”
Among those attending the funeral from away were Mr. and Mrs. Robert Pogue, of Paw Paw, Mr. and Mrs. C. O. Dean, Hinckley, Mr. and Mrs. C. C. Dean, Somonauk, Mr. and Mrs. John Dean, Sandwich, Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Henderson, Lee, Mrs. G. M. Hill, of Rockford and many others from Afton, Pierce and Victor Townships. –Hinckley Review. 11/14/1912

Ella Burmeister 1912.11.14
Ella, youngest daughter of Mr. and Mrs. William Burmeister, died Saturday (November 2, 1912) after being ill much of her entire life. She was 15 years, 9 months and 15 days old. The funeral occurred Monday at the German Lutheran church at 1:30 o’clock, Rev. Kroeger delivering the address. The pall bearers were six girl friends and members of Ella’s confirmation class, and many sympathizing friends attended the service.
HR 11/7/1912

Timothy O’Brien 1912.11.15
Sunday morning (November 3, 1912) members of the family found Timothy O’Brien dead in his bed at his country home, four miles north of Waterman. He leaves five children orphans, as Mrs. O’Brien died three weeks ago following an operation.
The coroner’s verdict was heart trouble, hastened by grief. Funeral services were held Monday forenoon at St. Mary’s Church in DeKalb, and his remains were laid to rest beside his wife.
Mr. O’Brien was born in DeKalb County, December 16, 1870. He prospered and a new residence was to be built next spring. The five children have the sympathy of the entire community, the oldest of which is fifteen. Surviving are the following sisters and brothers—Mrs. Frank Diedrick, Mrs. Robert McCormick, Mrs. Timothy Cunningham, and John, James, Dan and William O’Brien. Mr. and Mrs. W. T. Wiltberger, Mrs. Orvis Stryker and Miss Maude Philips attended the service. HR 11/7/1912

Mr. Keith 1912.11.16
Mr. and Mrs. E. E. Keith were called to Ellwood several days the fore part of the week by the sudden illness and death of Mr. Keith’s father. The latter was a public man, taking an active part in transacting the public business, and much private business in his community, and doubtless has drawn up more wills than any other man in his locality. He was highly esteemed for his sterling qualities. The funeral was held Wednesday (November 18, 1912) and the family from Hinckley attended. Mr. Keith was in Hinckley to visit his son just a few days before he was stricken. HR 11/26/1912

John Landers 1912.11.17
Grief came to Warren Landers and his folks the latter part of the week, when he received the news that his father, John Landers of Plano had been stricken with paralysis, and had died. He was also the father of Mrs. Fred Reimensnider, formerly of Hinckley. The funeral was held at Plano Sunday (November 21, 1912) and a good many friends from this neighborhood attended. He was well known here, and his death is a shock to a wide circle of friends. HR 11/21/1912

Margaret Theresia Noll Heifner 1912.12.10
Mrs. Albert Heifner died at home in Hinckley, Monday (December 9, 1912) after an illness of almost a year. The funeral was held from the home Wednesday morning, Father Bennett, of Aurora, preached the sermon. Mrs. Vosler and Mrs. Frey sang several selections. Mrs. Heifner leaves to mourn her loss, her husband and five children, all of whom were present at the funeral.
——————-
Mrs. Albert Heifner died at her home in Hinckley Monday (December 2, 1912) after being confined to the bed for a long time. She was a good mother, and her passing away will leave a void in the family circle that only time can assuage.
Margretha Theresia Noll was born in Tarsenzell, Germany, January 16, 1838. She was married to Albert Heifner April 18, 1869, and most of her life has been spent in this community. She was the mother of seven children, five of whom, with the aged husband, survive her.
Louise Heifner Ploger died four years ago. Anna died in infancy, and those who survive their mother are Mrs. Mary Hotopp, Charles Heifner, Mrs. Rose Thomas, Frank and George Heifner.
The funeral was held Wednesday at the home, the service being in charge of Father Bennett. The bearers were John Sebree, J. H. Bauder, William Cheney, William Rees, William Ashton and George Potter.
Among those present at the funeral from out of town were Mr. and Mrs. James Ploger and three sons, Frank and Charles Heifner and Father Bennett of Aurora, and Mr. and Mrs. John Stolp of Oswego.
Many here sincerely shook the hand of Father Bennett after the service. He is an aged man of the faith and it was more of an undertaking for him to make the trip to Hinckley than it would have been for a younger prelate. HR 12/5/1912

Baby Girl Pike 1912.12.11
Newspaper friends about the country are extending their sincere sympathy to Mr. and Mrs. Claude O. Pike of Sycamore, who are mourning the loss of their youngest child, a baby girl of seven months. Mr. Pike is the editor and publisher of the Sycamore Tribune, and his wide circle of friends are truly sorrowful over the bereavement that has come to him and his wife. HR 12/12/1912

Catherine Leigh Rees 1912.12.12
Mrs. Catherine Leigh Rees passed away at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Woolley in Oswego last Sunday evening (December 29, 1912) and in the passing of this venerable lady one of Oswego’s oldest residents has left this life. She was born in Wales about eighty four years ago, and has lived in America for many years. Her husband, William Rees, died about fifteen years ago, and since his death her home has been made most of the time with her daughter.
She was the mother of William Rees of Hinckley, who has been a great factor in the upbuilding of Hinckley, and is the present fire chief, and has been for a number of years. He with Mrs. Rees attended the funeral Wednesday, which was held from the Woolley home at Oswego.
Those who survive the mother are Mr. Rees of Hinckley; Mrs. Mary Severance of Brecinridge, MO; Edmond Rees of Bristol; Mrs. Harriett Curtis of St. Louis; Mrs. Margaret Woolley and Mrs. Alice Curtis of Oswego, and Mrs. Cyrus Wheeler of Hope, ND. HR 1/2/1913

John Franklin Coy 1912.12.13
The Sac Sun, Sac City, IA, January 2, 1913, contained the announcement of the death of John F. Coy at Sioux City, December 29, 1912. Mr. Coy lived at Odebolt, IA, and had gone to Sioux City on Saturday of the previous week. Death was the result of heart trouble. The remains were brought to Odebolt Monday and taken to the home of the decedent’s brother, where the funeral was held Tuesday afternoon at two o’clock. Burial was made in the Odebolt Cemetery beside the bodies of Mrs. Coy, who died a little over a year ago, and a daughter who died two years ago. Mr. Coy was the owner of an extensive seed corn business in Odebolt. The surviving relatives are three sons, three daughters and two brothers, all residents of Odebolt except the oldest son, Joseph, who is in San Francisco.
John Franklin Coy who was the fourth child of Bela Addison Coy and Delette Rosalia Crandall, was born in Kaneville, IL, August 1, 1863. In 1873 the father removed to Waterman and for about ten years was the town’s leading dry goods merchant. Here in the village school the son received the greater part of his education and many will remember him well. Then the family removed to Odebolt, IA, where son married February 17, 1875, Margaret Horan, who was born April 24, 1866, at DeWitt, IA. I have records only of the older children, all born in Odebolt; Florence Ione, February 22, 1888; Joe, July 7, 1890; Marie, March 9, 1893; Frank; Daisy Margaret, October 20, 1899.
HR 1/23/1913

George Harrington 1913.01.07
Comrade George Harrington was born September 26, 1835 in New Berlin, Chenango County, NY, and died at Hinckley, IL, January 11, 1913. As a lad thirteen years of age, he came with his parents to DeKalb County, IL, and settled on a farm in Squaw Grove Township. Excepting his early life in New York and three years spent as a soldier in the Civil War, his entire life was spent in Squaw Grove Township. For the last nine years he has made his home with his daughter, Mrs. Flanders in Hinckley. He attended the public schools both of New York and Illinois, thus acquiring such education as the school advantages of those early days offered. November 25, 1858 he was married at Sandwich, IL, to Miss Elvira A. Ward, who was born December 24, 1835, in Ohio and died in Hinckley, May 12, 1898. To this union three children were born, Mrs. J. J. Flanders, Mrs. Houghton of Franklin, IN, and Mrs. Stella Hall of Cashmere, WA. Mr. Harrington came from soldier stock and was himself a soldier. His great grandfather fought in the famous battle of Bunker Hill and his brother, Blinn, a member of the 127th Illinois Infantry, was killed at the siege of Vicksburg. Mr. Harrington enlisted for the rebellion at Sandwich, IL, August 22, 1862 as a private in Co. H, 105th Illinois Volunteer Infantry. During the war he was in many skirmishes and in thirteen heavy engagements. With one exception he accompanied his regiment into every battle in which it took part. He marched with Sherman from Atlanta to the sea and returned to Washington, taking part in the grand review held in that city. He came back to Chicago June 7, 1865. When a young man he was converted at Big Rock, IL, and joined the Baptist Church at that place. After returning from the war he brought his church letter to Hinckley and aided as a charter member in organizing the Hinckley Baptist Church. From that time on until his death, he remained an honored and faithful member. He leaves, besides his three daughters, one brother… (End of printed obituary)
——————-
One more of the boys who wore the blue is mustered out in the past week, and the sad duty of chronicling the death of Comrade George Harrington, private of the 105th Illinois Volunteers, is laid at the door of the home paper which he admired so much during his life.
Another of the boys of ’61 has gone to his final reward, and will not be present to take part in the dedication of the soldier’s monument in Greenwood Cemetery—a project in which he was greatly interested since its inception. Comrade Harrington passed away Saturday morning, January 11, 1913, about six o’clock in the morning, and his funeral was held Tuesday.
Deceased was born September 26, 1835, in New Berlin, Chenango County, NY, and during his entire lifetime he exhibited the sterling traits of character so peculiar to the “down-easter.” When he was but 13 years of age he came with his parents to DeKalb County and settled in Squaw Grove Township, and with the exception of his thirteen years in New York, and the three years spent as a private in the Civil War, his entire life was lived within the confines of Squaw Grove. During the last nine years his home has been with his daughter, Mrs. J. J. Flanders, where he passed away.
What educational advantages were offered in York State and in Illinois in those early days were eagerly taken advantage of by Mr. Harrington, and his studies in the two states, together with his Civil War experience equipped him with the knowledge to battle through life. November 25, 1858, he was married at Sandwich to Miss Elvira A. Ward, who passed away in Hinckley May 12, 1898. Three children were born to this union, Jessie A., now Mrs. J. J. Flanders of Hinckley; Ruth Eliza, now Mrs. W. E. Houghton of Franklin, IN, and Stella, now Mrs. Arthur J. Hall of Cashmere, WA. Besides the daughters, one brother, Buell Harrington of Ainsworth, NE, and three grandchildren—Lyle Flanders, George and Ruth Houghton—remain to mourn his loss. One brother, Blinn, was killed in the siege of Vicksburg.
Mr. Harrington’s life was one of a strenuous nature. His happiest hours the past few years were spent in sitting about with fellow comrades, reciting the stirring times of the early 60s—and his memory was prolific of incidents and anecdotes of the Civil War. For three years he followed the flag that he loved so well. He knew not fear; he despised cowardice; he admired manhood in its fullest sense. In fact, he was a true soldier, and espoused the cause of the north in the great struggle to free the blacks. During his war experience, he took part in many skirmishes with the valiant 105th Illinois. He was actively engaged in thirteen heavy battles—all but one in which his company took part. He marched with Sherman to the sea, and completed his soldier career by taking part in the grand review at Washington at the close of the rebellion. He arrived in Chicago June 7, 1865; was paid off three days later, and received his honorable discharge June 17, 1865.
Religiously, he has always been a Baptist, joining church at Big Rock in his younger years. He was a charter member of the Baptist Church at Hinckley and has always been a faithful member.
Rev. Mr. Watson of the Big Rock Baptist Church was assisted by Rev. W. W. Diehl of the Hinckley Methodist Church and the active pall bearers were George Potter, W. L. Rees, George Burket, P. F. Slater, A. J. Coster, F. C. Schmidt. The honorary guard consisted of Comrades E. P. Gardiner, H. D. Wagner, William Von Ohlen, E. H. Darnell, William Coulson, Michael Devine.
Members of the G. A. R. Post and W. R. C. of Aurora attended in a body. Mr. Harrington was a member of the Aurora post for many years. HR 1/16/1913

Thomas Wood 1913.01.12
Mr. Thomas Wood, for many years an employee of the American Express Company in Aurora, passed away last week and leaves several relatives in this neighborhood to mourn his loss.
His wife is a daughter of Mr. William Culp of Hinckley and a sister of George Culp and Mrs. Fred Wedemeier. George Wood of Hinckley is a son of the veteran express driver.
Funeral services were held in Aurora Sunday from the Fourth Street Methodist Church of which he was a member, and the exercises were in charge of Ben Hur Lodge of Odd Fellows.
According to his request, the old horse which he drove for the express company so long, was impressed into service to help draw his remains from the house to the church and from the church to the cemetery. HR 1/16/1913

Sarah Anderson Porter 1913.01.13
Mrs. Sarah Porter, an old settler in Waterman, who has been sick for fifteen months with lung and heart trouble, died Monday morning (January 20, 1913). Thirty one years ago she was left a widow with two small children with nothing to depend upon but her own resources. She was a painstaking worker, conservative, above the average in intelligence and proved a capable mother.
Sarah Anderson was born February 17, 1841 in Churchtown, Cumberland County, PA. She is the first to be called from a family of three boys and four girls with the exception of one sister, Mrs. Will Mennis, who was lost in the Galveston flood.
She was united in marriage to James Porter in 1877, who died five years later. The son, William J., died January 26, 1907, leaving a wife and little daughter in Chicago. The daughter and only surviving member of the family lives at Greensburg, KS. The brothers and sisters now left are Kirk Anderson, Ft. Scott, KS; Jerry Anderson, Altoloma, TX; Millard Anderson, Prescott, IA; Mrs. James Wakefield, Woolrey, KS; Mrs. Lena Branscomb, Rockville, NE. The brother, Millard reached her bedside twelve hours before death. The funeral was held this forenoon and Rev. W. H. Otjen delivered the address.
HR 1/23/1913

Irvin Reingardt 1913.01.14
Friends and relatives in Hinckley have received the sad news of the death of Irvin Reingardt, son of Mr. and Mrs. Henry Reingardt, who left Hinckley about eight years ago for the Indiana home. The young man was born in Hinckley and at the time of his death was a student in the Idaville Schools. The Idaville Observer says:
“Irvin, youngest son of Mr. and Mrs. Henry Reingardt, died Monday night (January 13, 1913) from pneumonia. Irvin was a bright boy almost fourteen years of age, a student in our local schools and well liked by his friends and acquaintances. He leaves a father, mother and three brothers. Funeral services were conducted Thursday at the M. E. Church by Rev. Lindhorst, Lutheran minister of Reynolds.” HR 1/23/1913

Charlotte Snider Hohm 1913.02.01
Mrs. Charlotte Hohm died Sunday afternoon (February 16, 1913) at the home of her son, Dan, in South Grove.
The deceased was born in Hamberg, Germany November 17, 1834, coming to New York in 1855 and from that state to Plano in 1856. This last place she made her home until 1878 when she came to DeKalb county to make her home with her son Daniel, with whom she has resided until death came.
Her husband Vincent Hohm, died September 29, 1899. Surviving her besides her son with whom she lived, is another son, Lew Hohm of Friend, NE.
The funeral services were held this Tuesday afternoon at the home in South Grove, the remains being taken to Victor Township for burial Wednesday morning.
Her presence will be greatly missed by those whom she was cherished and loved, and her many friends will be grieved to hear of her death.
——————–
When Dan Hohm, the popular ex-sheriff, was here Saturday (February 15, 1913) some of his friends learned that his mother was very low, and not expected to live many hours. The aged lady passed away soon after he arrived home.
Charlotte Snider Hohm was seventy seven years old, and for the latter part of her life has made her home with her son Dan and family. When they moved to the farm in Kirkland Township, she went with them, and it was on the home farm that she passed away.
The funeral was held Tuesday and interment was made in the Victor Cemetery, several friends and relatives attending from Hinckley. HR 2/20/1913
Otto Johnson 1913.02.16
Otto Johnson, the twenty year old son of Mr. and Mrs. M. C. Johnson, who live north of Hinckley, passed away at the family home at eleven o’clock Friday morning (February 14, 1913) while being helped across the room from the couch to an easy chair. He was born on the home farm January 29, 1893.
During the latter part of last July, Otto was hauling hay, when the load tipped over, and part of the wagon passed over his abdomen. Internal injuries resulted, and since the accident he has been ill a good share of the time. For along while it was thought he was afflicted with a tubercular trouble, but since his death, it is almost certainly determined that the injuries received last summer account for his early demise.
Otto Johnson was well liked by all his neighbors and friends. He was an industrious young man, and loved his home and his home people and the town. His death coming so suddenly, while at the same time it was anticipated, was a great shock to the community.
Friday morning he arose as usual and dressed, and entered the living room of the home and reclined on the couch. A few minutes later he asked his mother to help him to a large easy chair near one of the windows. Just as he reached the chair his head fell forward and life had passed from his body. The father was in town on errands at the time, and the sad ending of the young life was witnessed only by the mother who had tended him and ministered to his wants ever since he was hurt.
The funeral was held Monday, and the service was conducted by Rev. M. Hoeffer of St. Paul’s Church, and the large number of sorrowing friends who attended, many coming from a long distance, was a silent tribute to the esteem in which the young man was held.
Nine brothers and sisters, besides the parents, survive him. It is the first death in a family of ten children, and a great blow to the family. The children surviving are—John, Peter, Christina, Cassie, Mary, Dolly, Harry, Elmer and Doris.
The bearers at the funeral were young friends of the deceased—John and Hans Skau, Floyd and Earl Von Ohlen, John Limacher and Archie Ramer. Interment was made in Greenwood Cemetery.
The family wishes to express their sincere gratitude to the many friends and neighbors who were so considerate and helpful during the illness and death of the son and brother.
HR 2/20/1913

Mrs. William E. Hemenway 1913.02.17
Hinckley relatives were shocked to hear of the death of Mrs. William E. Hemenway at Steward Sunday evening (February 16, 1913). For several years she has been a sufferer from rheumatism. She was well advanced in years, and was a lady of unusual heavy weight. These causes, it is believed, are accountable for her sudden demise.
Saturday she was at the table with members of the family as usual, and no one in the family had any suspicion that the end was so near for one of their circle.
Mrs. Hemenway’s husband is a brother of Miss Flora Hemenway and Mr. Abe Hemenway of Hinckley, both of whom attended the funeral, which was held yesterday. Interment was made in the family lot at Steward. HR 2/20/1913

Mrs. Evans 1913.02.18
Friends and relatives of John P. Evans are extending sympathy to him over the news that his mother passed away Sunday (February 16, 1913) at her home in the Catville neighborhood. She was well advanced in years, and her demise was due to a brief illness, augmented by her age. Friends from here attended the funeral which was held Tuesday.
HR 2/20/1913

Israel Davis 1913.02.19
Israel Davis, whose memory will linger long with his friends, was a workman on the section in Hinckley about twenty five years ago, when he came here from North Wales in 1886. His “boss” was the late John Mulroy, and in those days some of the best specimens of manhood were section men and section foremen. Mr. Davis displayed that rare trait of the Welsh—conscientious service to his employers—and he readily learned the intricate business of taking care of a great corporation’s right of way. A few years before he left these parts for Chicago, he was appointed foreman of the Waterman division, and moved to Waterman.
It was while he was employed at Waterman that he met with what was considered a slight accident. The men were lifting a rail, and the end of it dropped on Mr. Davis’ foot. He was directing the work. The heavy rail crushed the large toe on his right foot, and it was necessary to amputate a portion of the toe. At first it was thought the member was doing nicely, but it soon became necessary to perform a second operation and remove more of the foot. A third operation followed, and more of the foot was removed. It was twenty four years ago when the accident happened.
About eight years ago, Mr. Davis moved to Chicago, and has made his home most of the time with his stalwart son, Evan T. Davis. About a week ago gangrene set in on the opposite side of the foot from the injury, and the poison soon enveloped his whole body, and death came as a merciful relief at two o’clock Saturday morning (February 22, 1913).
Mr. Davis was a staunch Welshman, of iron constitution, a man of temperate and exemplary habits and a good citizen and home maker.
His wife was called by death forty years ago the twentieth of next May, but his surviving children have, through all these years, done their utmost to make their father’s life all that it held for him. He was born in the North Wales home in 1839, and came direct to Hinckley, IL in 1886.
Two children—Evan T. Davis of Chicago, and Mrs. John Fonken of Kenosha, survive him. Nine grandchildren and one great grandchild are also left to revere the memory of a good grandfather.
The remains were sent to Hinckley Monday morning, and services were conducted by Rev. W. W. Diehl of the Methodist Church. Interment was made at the West Big Rock Cemetery.
The bearers were Elihu Ramer, P. F. Slater, Oscar Ramer, Ernest Leifheit, William Rees and John E. Jones. Mrs. Coster and Mrs. Fry sang, accompanied at the piano by Mrs. Kennedy.
The children wish to extend their sincere thanks to those who assisted during the services at Hinckley.
Both the surviving children were here Monday—Evan and wife and two sons, and Mrs. Fonken and son. HR 2/27/1913
Lillian Bowers Tomblin 1913.03.01
The remains of Mrs. Oscar Tomblin were taken to Waterman Saturday (March 1, 1913) by her husband from West Pullman. Death followed an operation, though she had been in poor health for years. She was 58 years old. The surviving brothers and sisters are W. H. Bowers, A. A. Bowers of West Pullman, Mrs. S. F. Greene of Chicago, Mrs. H. A. York of Shabbona and Grant Bowers of Waterman. Among the funeral party were Mr. and Mrs. Norman Tomblin, Mrs. Marlon of Aurora, Mrs. Mason of Chicago and Allen Bowers of West Pullman.
——————-
The remains of Mrs. Oscar Tomblin were brought to Waterman Saturday (February 22, 1913) from West Pullman, and were buried at Clinton cemetery beside her only son Claude, who died twenty years ago.
Lillian Bowers was born May 29, 1854, in this vicinity. She has been in poor health many years; death followed an operation. She was united in marriage to Oscar Tomblin, who is left to mourn her departure. The surviving brothers and sisters are W. H. Bowers, A. A. Bowers, West Pullman; Mrs. S. F. Greene, Auburn Park; Mrs. H. A. York, Shabbona; and Grant Bowers, Waterman.
Rev. W. H. Otjen had charge of the service. Among the mourners were Allen Bowers of West Pullman, Mrs. Mason of Chicago, Mr. and Mrs. Norman Tomblin and Mrs. Will Marion of Aurora. HR 2/27/1913

Louis Baie 1913.03.06
Louie Baie, son of Mr. and Mrs. August Baie, died suddenly Friday night (March 29, 1913) of scarlet fever. He leaves a wife and seven children, besides his parents, several brothers and sisters, and a large circle of other relatives. He was buried Sunday afternoon in the Hartman Cemetery northwest of town (Hinckley).
———————
One of the saddest deaths of this community for many years happened Saturday morning (March 30, 1913) at 3:30, when Louis Baie, in the Big Rock neighborhood, passed away at his farm home. His dead body was found in bed by his seventeen year old daughter, Miss Eva Baie, who went to his room to see if he wanted anything. Noticing no respiration, she placed her hand over her father’s heart and discovered that life had been extinct some time.
For many weeks the Baie home has been afflicted with sickness. The mother, who was Miss Caroline Garbleman, has been seriously ill, and is now in a very critical condition. Scarlet fever and black measles invaded the home and the children were taken with the disease. The father, who died Saturday morning, was able, by his great strength, to keep about and ward off the disease for many weeks, but finally he was so weakened by the loss of sleep and exhaustion that he succumbed, and while in a delirious state Friday afternoon went out onto the front porch, thinly clad, and contracted the cold that claimed his life in less than twelve hours.
Of course the home is under quarantine and no one is allowed to enter or leave. A trained nurse is in charge of the several cases, and Dr. Marion, the Big Rock physician, having been taken ill, his duties are being performed by Dr. Nash. The many friends and relatives of Mr. and Mrs. Baie and the family deeply sympathize with them in this critical period.
Louis Baie was the son of Mr. and Mrs. August Baie, Sr., of Hinckley. He was born on the old home farm March 3, 1873. This is one of the most prominent families in this vicinity, and Louis is the first of a large family to pass from this life, both his father and mother surviving him. Besides these are Will and Herman Baie, half brothers; and Edward, Albert, Ernest, Ferdinand and Arthur, and Mrs. Max Melhorn, Mrs. C. Heine and Miss Lena Baie. He had lived on the farm in Big Rock Township for fourteen years and just completed extensive improvements and remodeling on the farm home. Everything was in fine shape for this good family to enjoy life and reap the benefits of hard labor. Then the mother was stricken with goiter; the father spent many sleepless nights in the care of the household; then the measles and scarlet fever came, and the father himself was taken down with the malady, and the elder daughter found herself in charge of many sad and serious cases. It is a critical time in the family life and the community hereabouts surely extends sympathy and all the help that is possible in such a time.
A private funeral was held Sunday, and burial was made in the Squaw Grove German Lutheran Cemetery, with a brief service following the lowering of the casket. Pastor Kroeger said many words of condolence for the relatives and friends, and the bearers were all brothers of the deceased—Herman, Edward, Albert, Ernest, Ferdinand and Arthur. HR 4/3/1913

Walter O. Wiltberger 1913.03.13
This community was shocked yesterday morning when the news came that Walter O. Wiltberger had passed away at his home in DeKalb Tuesday (March 4, 1913). He was taken suddenly with pneumonia Friday night after spending the day at his newsstand as usual. His illness was brief and he died early Tuesday afternoon.
Deceased was born near Waterman forty four years ago and was well and popularly known throughout this county and especially in his home vicinity. The first twenty years of his life were spent in Clinton Township and in Hinckley, moving later to DeKalb. He was a man of marked ability and possessed a wonderful memory. He was for years a successful traveling man until his health failed, when he went into the news business at DeKalb.
Many sorrowing friends sympathize with the family, which has been sorely afflicted of late. Mrs. Wiltberger is just recovering from a serious operation which was performed in December; five weeks ago they lost their oldest child, a bright boy of ten years from scarlet fever. The two younger children, a boy and a girl, did not contract the disease.
Mr. Wiltberger’s mother and two sisters were with him when he passed away, and besides these, he leaves a widow and the two children.
The funeral was held this afternoon in DeKalb, and it was one of the largest attended funerals for many years in that city. A great number of friends in this section will miss his happy, genial spirit, and had the roads and weather been in better condition many from here would have attended. HR 3/6/1913

A. F. VanAelstyn 1913.03.14
Miss Lutie VanAelstyn, assistant cashier at the State Bank, was called to Chicago last night (March 19, 1913) to the sick bed of her father, Mr. A. F. VanAelstyn, but he passed away shortly before she arrived home. Many friends here extend their deep sympathy to Miss VanAelstyn and the members of the family. Burial will probably be made at Marengo Friday.
Mr. VanAelstyn was a business man in Hinckley for many years, having a frame store building on the present site of the State Bank building. About ten or twelve years ago he moved to Chicago where he has since made his home. HR 3/20/1913

Christian Frederick Martin 1913.03.15
C. F. Martin, a well known citizen who had barely reached the prime of life, died suddenly Thursday forenoon. His illness dates back some eight months and the malady from the start baffled the various physicians. During the last seven weeks he suffered an attack of pneumonia and was cared for at the East Side Hospital; he recovered sufficiently to return home, every indication being favorable and the family looked forward to his recovery.
He was six feet tall and weighed over 200 pounds. For several years he has conducted the well drilling and pump repairing business.
Christian Frederick Martin was born June 27, 1860, between Hinckley and Waterman and died March 20, 1913. His entire life has been spent in this community. He held various town offices and at the time of his death was constable. November 18, 1887, in DeKalb, he was married to Miss Anna Sarbaugh. Two daughters—Carolyn and Eleanor—were born to them. The latter died 10 years ago.. Besides his wife and Miss Carolyn, three sisters survive—Mrs. Bertha Hall of New York City, Mrs. Anna Harris of Evanston, Mrs. Agnes Field of Chicago; also one half sister, Miss Emma Martin and one half brother, Craige Martin, of Biloxi, MS.
The funeral was held Saturday at his residence with Rev. W. D. Watson, pastor of the Big Rock Baptist Church, officiating. Misses Georgia Davenport and Sarah McFarlane sang appropriate hymns, with Miss Andrews as accompanist. Interment was at Johnson Grove Cemetery. HR 3/27/1913

Jane L. Quimbey Foster 1913.03.16
Mrs. Jane L. Foster passed away at the home of her sons on the farm near Hinckley Tuesday evening (March 25, 1913) about seven o’clock, after conversing with her boys within ten minutes of the last. Her condition had gradually changed for the worse since early morning, and the end was peaceful.
Jane L. Quimbey was born in Vermont, August 18, 1835, and came to DeKalb County about fifty years ago, living the first year in Sandwich Township, then moving to the farm now owned by the two sons. She was an ideal mother and neighbor and her friends are numbered by the score, and while she has not been active in community circles for a long time, her presence will be sorely missed by those who knew her best.
Mrs. Foster was the last of a family of five children—four girls and one boy—all typical representatives of that sturdy stock that comes from the Green Mountain state. Her husband died about thirteen years ago; and she has made her home most of the time with her two sons, Melvin and Edgar, her only near survivors.
The funeral will be held tomorrow at two o’clock from the Methodist Church in Hinckley, with Pastor Diehl in charge of the services. According to Mrs. Foster’s request, Mrs. Coster and Mrs. Fry will sing; Mrs. Chapdell will be at the piano.
The bearers are John N. Price, A. J. Coster, E. C. McWethy, J. J. Flanders and C. O. Dean. Interment will be made at Greenwood Cemetery. HR 3/27/1913

S. V. Howell 1913.03.17
A year ago this month, Mr. and Mrs. S. V. Howell sold out the extensive herd of fine dairy cattle, the farm machinery, and the farm just west of town and moved to Chicago. For many years Mr. Howell had been one of the most prominent farmers in this locality. He loved fine stock. He engaged extensively in stock raising, devoting his energies especially to a fine herd of dairy cattle. His farm was a model farm, situated on the west end of the village, and the home was noted for years for its unlimited hospitality.
Mr. Howell was born in Belleville, Canada, September 10, 1844, and in 1860 he came to the United States, nine years later arriving in Squaw Grove Township, where the major portion of his life was spent. He was twice married—in 1868 to Miss Ella Sebree, a sister of W. M. Sebree of Windham, MT; and in 1909 to Mrs. Jennie Gallagher of Chicago. His first wife died in 1903. No children were born to either of these unions, but early in his married life Mr. and Mrs. Howell adopted Charles Christianson, who has been a loyal and faithful son. He was just a youngster when he went into the Howell home, and he greatly misses his foster father.
Since living in Chicago, Mr. Howell has been in poor health. He underwent two operations, and his health in the past month or two had failed rapidly. His remains were brought to Hinckley Tuesday morning (March 25, 1913) and the service was held at the Methodist Church in the afternoon. He became a member of this church November 25, 1877, and when he moved to Chicago his letter was transferred to the Epworth M. E. Church. Rev. W. W. Diehl had charge of the service and preached a consoling sermon on the uncertainty of life. Mrs. F. E. Graves, and Mrs. George Fry sang, with Mrs. Chappell at the piano. The bearers were Abe Hemenway, H. H. Leifheit, C.O. Dean, H. J. Wilcox, William Rees and John Meyers. Interment was in Greenwood Cemetery. HR 3/27/1913

Mrs. H. C. (Kosier) Newcomer 1913.03.18
Mr. and Mrs. C. C. Kennedy and Lieutenant and Mrs. Frank C. Kennedy left Hinckley yesterday morning to attend the funeral of Mrs. C. C. Kennedy’s sister, Mrs. H. C. Newcomer, at Byron, IL, the seat of the Kosier family.
Mrs. Newcomer had been afflicted for a long time with a goiter, which developed a cancerous growth, and her death was due to this cause. She was about fifty years of age and was the wife of Lieutenant Colonel H. C. Newcomer of Washington, D. C., of the engineering corps of the federal army. She leaves two sisters and two brothers—Mrs. J. H. Heald of Byron and Mrs. Kennedy of Hinckley; Charles K. Kosier of Chicago and Bert Kosier of Byron. Besides these the father survives her. He is a well known Mason and has been an active member of the craft and lodge officer in this part of the state for many years and just recently attend the sessions of the Hinckley Lodge when his grandson, Lieutenant Frank Kennedy, was made a Master Mason. She has three sons surviving also. One son graduates from West Point this summer; the older one is in Germany, and the youngest is in Byron, and visited here with the grandfather a few weeks ago. HR 4/3/1913

Johanna VonOhlen Thorel 1913.04.08
Mrs. Henry Thorel, an old and highly respected resident of Hinckley died at her home Friday afternoon (April 11, 1913) after an illness of over two months. She was 78 years of age.
Mr. Thorel died a few years ago, since which time, Mrs. Thorel had lived alone until recently, her nephew, Arvild Boller, made his home with her. During this illness he has cared for her, his efforts being supplemented by those of a trained nurse during the last weeks. Mrs. Thorel left no children. She is survived by one sister, Mrs. Chris Baie and one brother, William VonOhlen, who both reside in Hinckley, besides a host of relatives.
—————–
Mrs. Henry Thorel passed away at her late home in Hinckley Friday afternoon, April 11, 1913 after an illness of nearly three years. Since the death of her husband about three years ago, she has been in poor health and during the past year her condition gradually grew worse. Since the first week in February she has been confined to her bed; During the last three years of her life Arvie F. Boller, a nephew, has made his home with her.
Johanna VonOhlen was born in Wenzen, Brunswick, Germany, November 20, 1835. She came to America in 1855, and to DeKalb County in 1856. She was married to Henry Thorel at Sandwich, July 6, 1856, and made her home in Sandwich Township, Leland and Clinton Townships until they moved to Hinckley in February 1889.
She united with the German Evangelical Church at an early age and for a long time has been an active and working member of the church and auxiliary societies at St. Paul’s; her husband served as a member of the building committee when the present church building was erected.
One sister and three brothers are left to mourn the loss of this good woman—Mrs. C. H. Baie of Hinckley; William VonOhlen of Hinckley, Henry VonOhlen of Somonauk and Christian VonOhlen of Chicago.
The funeral was held from St. Paul’s Church Monday afternoon, and was conducted by Pastor J. A. Hoefer. Music was furnished by Mrs. Will Leifheit and Miss Stella Wedkemper. The bearers were William Hartman, Dudley Loptien, Conrad Wilkening, Henry Manser, Fred Wedkemper and Henry Weddige.
Among the relatives from out of town who were present at the funeral were: Mrs. Alvina VonOhlen, Mr. and Mrs. Christian VonOhlen, Jr., Mr. and Mrs. Charles Olson, Anna and Julia VonOhlen, Emil, Louis and Ernest VonOhlen and Miss Emma Haseman of Leland, Edward VonOhlen of Paw Paw, Mr. and Mrs. William Baie of Sandwich, Herman Ebrecht of Bristol.
HR 4/17/1913

Mandiville H. Bennitt 1913.04.16
Mr. and Mrs. David Hobbs went to Bristol Wednesday morning (April 2, 1913) to attend the funeral of Mandiville H. Bennitt, a brother of Mrs. Hobbs’ father. Deceased was a veteran of he Civil War and a member of Company H of the 12th Illinois Cavalry. He was a good soldier and won distinction for service in the war. He came from the east, where he was born December 19, 1833, and during the past sixty seven years, with the exception of his war service, he has lived in Bristol Township, Kendall County. The funeral was held yesterday at the home in Bristol. HR 4/3/1913

Hugh Duffy 1913.04.17
Hugh Duffy, a prominent farmer who has resided his entire life between Shabbona and Waterman, was killed Wednesday evening of last week (April 9, 1913) while returning from Shabbona. His horse ran away, throwing him into a ditch. Being stunned, he drowned before regaining consciousness. Mr. Duffy was 37 years old and leaves, besides his wife and six children, the following brother and sisters—Mrs. Frank Mihms, and Mrs. Katherine Dugan of DeKalb; Mrs. George Mihms of Rochelle; James, Lawrence and Mary of Shabbona, and William and Patrick of Waterman. The funeral was held Saturday at the Catholic Church in Lee. HR 4/7/1913

George W. Lee 1913.04.18
George W. Lee was born in Sterling County, OH, in 1832, and when not quite three years of age, he came to Illinois and this part of DeKalb County with his parents. He was married in 1856 to Miss Rosetta Cone, in the log house on the old Cone homestead, and all of his life, with the exception of about five years in Missouri, was spent in this immediate neighborhood. For several generations the Lee family owned and occupied the farm just west of town, recently bought and sold by Mr. Stewart. The family took up the land originally from the government. He died last night, Wednesday (April 16, 1913), at 7 o’clock.
Mr. Lee’s wife died December 17, 1910. Their only child is Mrs. William Cheney of Hinckley, with whom the venerable father has made his home for some time.
The funeral will be held from the Cheney home Saturday afternoon at 2 o’clock, with Rev. W. W. Diehl in charge.
HR 4/17/1913
———————
George W. Lee was born I Huron County, OH, April 6, 1832, and died in Hinckley April 16, 1913. Early in life he came with his parents to Squaw Grove.
January 1, 1856 he was married to Miss Rosetta Cone. To this union one child was born—Miss Rosetta Lee—now Mrs. William Cheney.
In the spring of 1870 he moved to Missouri, remaining in that state until January 1, 1875. From that time on he made his home in Hinckley.
Mrs. Lee died December 17, 1910. Since then he has made his home with his daughter and her husband.
The funeral was held at the home of Mrs. Cheney Saturday. Music was rendered by Mesdames Graves, Fry and Kennedy. The bearers were Charles Leifheit,
William Rees, William Ashton, M. H. Beitel, Eddie Ashton and George Potter. Rev. W. W. Diehl conducted the services. Interment was in Miller’s Cemetery. In the passing of Mr. Lee, DeKalb County loses one of its oldest pioneers, he having settled in Squaw Grove as early as 1835.
Among those from out of town at the funeral were Bert Cheney of Chicago, John Eastabrook of Aurora and O. R. Tanner of Hageman, NM. HR 4/27/1913

Augustus White 1913.04.19
Augustus White was born May 6, 1818 in Washington County, OH, and with his parents and family came to Illinois in about 1852. He was the oldest resident of DeKalb County, being nearly ninety five years of age, passing away Tuesday afternoon (April 15, 1913). He was an exceptionally active and vigorous man, and up to within a few months he was a regular visitor down town, enjoying the extensive walk from the home of his daughter, Mrs. Fay, where he enjoyed spending his winters. His summers were usually spent with another daughter, Mrs. George Bushnell at Cedar Rapids, and he made his trips alone.
Mr. White’s first wife died June 17, 1880, since which time his life has been lived with his children.
Mr. White’s oldest son, Elias, was killed in battle during the Civil War, and nothing was ever heard of his remains. Another son, Alcott, died in a Missouri hospital.
The surviving children are Mrs. George Bushnell of Cedar Rapids, IA; Alto E. White of Minneapolis, MN, and Mrs. A. W. Fay of Hinckley.
Arrangements have been made for the funerals at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Fay Friday afternoon at 2 o’clock, and Pastor Diehl of the Methodist Church will deliver the sermon. HR 4/17/1913
———————–
The funeral of the late Augustus White was held at the home of his daughter, Mrs. A. W. Fay, Friday afternoon, with Pastor Diehl of the Methodist Church in charge.
Mr. White was doubtless DeKalb county’s oldest citizen. He would have been ninety five years of age had he lived until the sixth of next month. He was a typical down-easter, being born in Ohio, and not coming to this state until about 1852.
Among the relatives from abroad who were here to attend the funeral were his daughter, Mrs. George Bushnell and her daughter of Cedar Rapids, IA, and his son, E. E. White of Minneapolis, MN.
Up to within a short time of his death he was especially active for one of his years, and he will be greatly missed for a long time by the relatives and friends who enjoyed so much his goings and comings.
The bearers at the funeral were M. H. Beitel, H. J. Wilcox, William Ashton, George Kesner, P. F. Slater and Eddie Ashton.
HR 4/27/1913

Oscar M. Tanner 1913.04.20
Oscar M. Tanner, one of the pioneers of this section, passed away at his home in Aurora Sunday afternoon (April 13, 1913) at the age of eighty five years. He was born in Alexandra, NY, February 3, 1828, and when he was eight years of age accompanied his parents to Illinois, settling in this part of DeKalb County, where he lived many years.
His widow, who was Miss Sarah J. Spaulding, survives, and also five children—Mrs. Rosella Slater, Mrs. John Easterbrooks and Mrs. Burton Denny of Aurora; O. R. Tanner of Hagerman, NM, and Mrs. Rhoda Wanless of Chicago. Eight grandchildren and three great grandchildren also survive him. The funeral was held Wednesday afternoon in Aurora. HR 4/17/1913

John L. Broad 1913.04.21
Many friends and relatives here were shocked to hear of the death of John J. Broad near Amboy last week. He was the husband of Miss Alice Hubbard and had a host of acquaintances here.
It seems that Mr. Broad had taken a short trip on his track machine, which is called a “speeder” among railroad men. He was an employee of the Northwestern at the time, but instead of returning home on his own company’s tracks he took a shorter route over the Burlington tracks.
According to the brief statements he made to his father during his conscious moments after the accident, it is gleaned that he was traveling at a pretty fast rate of speed when his machine suddenly left the track, throwing him forcibly to the ground, breaking both legs, one arm, a collar bone and cutting a deep gash in his head. He was picked up by a passing train crew and taken to a hospital where he lived for a short time only.
He was born at Ida Grove, IA, July 13, 1879, and died at Amboy April 19, 1913. He lived in Iowa, in California, and in Sterling and Chicago, IL. He was a pressman by trade, but lately had been with the Northwestern Railroad.
He was married in Chicago June 16, 1906, to Miss Alice Hubbard of Hinckley.
The body was brought to Hinckley Monday morning and services were held at the Methodist Church, conducted by Pastor Diehl. Miss Aileen Tiede presided at the piano and Mrs. Graves and Mrs. Fry sang. The bearers were John Price, John Jones, F. C. Schmidt, Jerry Seifert, Melvin Foster and A. J. Coster.
HR 4/27/1913

Emma Bish Pfeiffer 1913.05.08
Mrs. Casper Pfeiffer of Zion City. died suddenly about ten o’clock Monday morning (May 12, 1913) at the home of her sister, Mrs. John Kiehl on West Center Street.
Mrs. Pfeiffer had been in poor health for some time and had been visiting with relatives at Hinckley for the past month. About a week ago she came to Sandwich to visit her sister for a short time before returning to her home in Zion City. On Monday morning she complained of not feeling as well as usual. She was placed in bed and a physician summoned, who, when he arrived notified Mr. and Mrs. Kiehl that the end was near. Her husband was at once notified but she passed away before his arrival. The body was taken to Hinckley on Tuesday, where the funeral will be held this afternoon at two o’clock from the Methodist Church.
Deceased was about 51 years of age, and leaves, besides her husband, six children, four sons and two daughters to mourn her death.
———————-
Mrs. Emma Pfeiffer died at the home of her sister, Mrs. Kiehl, in Sandwich, Monday morning (May 12, 1913) at 9:30 o’clock. Up to 4:30 she had been feeling in as good health as usual and was preparing to return to the home of another sister, Miss Bish, in Hinckley. Her husband arrived from the home in Zion City shortly after she passed away. The funeral is being held from the Methodist Church in Hinckley this afternoon, with Pastor Diehl in charge. HR 5/15/1913
——————-
The funeral of Mrs. Casper Pfeiffer of Zion City was held from the Methodist Church in Hinckley last Thursday afternoon, and a great number of friends and relatives gathered to testify to their esteem of this splendid woman. The Pfeiffer family left the farm in this vicinity five or six years ago and moved to Zion City, where the family home is at present. Deceased had been visiting in Hinckley for some time, and went to Sandwich to visit a sister, when she was stricken with death, just as she was making preparations to return to Hinckley.
Emma Bish was born August 21, 1862, the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Nicholas Bish, one of the prominent families of this township. She is survived by the husband and six children and five sisters.
At the funeral Thursday the four sons were the bearers, and music was furnished by Mrs. A. R. Dewey and Mrs. G. C. Fry, Rev. W. W. Diehl having charge of the service. Miss Aileen Tiede presided at the piano. HR 5/22/1913

Grace Ott 1913.05.12
Little Grace Ott, six year old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Charlie Ott, died early Monday morning (May 19, 1913) at the home, northwest of town, of a complication of diseases. The funeral was held Wednesday at the M. E. Church and burial in the Miller Cemetery.
———————
One of the saddest funerals held in Hinckley for many a year was held yesterday afternoon when the little six year old daughter of Mrs. and Mrs. Charles Ott was laid to rest. The little girl was an especially bright little Miss; she took a great interest in her Sunday school classes, and her ideas of the hereafter were especially advanced and pertinent for one of her age.
For several weeks she had suffered with typhoid fever and a complication of other troubles, and it was apparent almost from the first that the little body could not long withstand the ravages of disease. Through it all she maintained a patient and yielding spirit.
The funeral was held from the Methodist Church in Hinckley yesterday afternoon, and Pastor Diehl’s remarks were touchingly appropriate to the occasion, and a great number of friends sympathized deeply with the stricken parents.
Four young men—all cousins of the little girl—acted as bearers—Hans, John and Otto Skau, and Charlie Ott. Mrs. G. C. Fry and Mrs. F E. Graves sang, and Miss Aileen Tiede presided at the piano. Interment was made in the Miller Cemetery.
HR 5/22/1913

James Milton 1913.05.23
Mrs. William Ashton and Mr. John N. Price left Hinckley Friday night for Friend, NE, to attend the funeral of their brother-in-law, James Milton.
The local people received a telegram bearing the sad news Friday (May 23, 1913), and both made immediate preparation to leave for Friend.
Mr. Milton is a former resident of Hinckley where he was married, and there are many friends here who sympathize with the relatives. His nephew, Alex Booth, of Hinckley, was with him at the time of his death. HR 5/29/1913

Charles M. Tompkins 1913.06.13
C. M. Tompkins, a veteran of the Civil War and a pioneer business man., died Sunday afternoon, June 8, 1913. For a year he has been in poor health.
Charles M. Tompkins was born December 14, 1846, near Batavia, and with the exception of one brother, V. R. Tompkins of Aurora, he is the last of a family of six children. He enlisted in the 124th Illinois Infantry at Batavia and was discharged September 5, 1873. He was united in marriage to Miss Louise Coy. In November of the same year they moved to Waterman where he has carried on a first class blacksmith shop and livery business for thirty nine years.
To them two sons were born—Fred B. and Charles W., who were associated with their father in business the past fifteen years.
The funeral was Tuesday from his late home, Rev. W. M. White, pastor of the Presbyterian Church, officiating. A mixed quartet—Messrs. Davis and White and Misses Fearon and McFarlane sang several selections, one number being “Tenting Tonight on the Old Camp Ground;” Miss Andrews was accompanist. Burial was at Johnson Grove Cemetery. Surviving are the wife, two sons and three grandchildren. Relatives were in attendance from Batavia, Aurora and Paw Paw. HR 6/12/1913

Louis Schmidt 1913.06.14
Louis Schmidt, son of mayor and Mrs. Fred M. Schmidt, was laid to rest in Greenwood Cemetery, yesterday.
The services were held in the Methodist Church, conducted by Pastor J. A. Hoeffer of St. Paul’s. He was assisted by Rev. E. Rathmann of Chicago, a former pastor of St. Paul’s who confirmed the young man and received him into membership, and by Rev. W. W. Diehl of the Methodist Church. The house was packed with friends and relatives of the family.
Following the service at the home, the remains were taken to the church. The bearers were six cousins—Fred Schoo of Peoria; Amel and Bert Schoo of Aurora; Harry Schoo of Somonauk and Harry and Adolph Schmidt of Riceville, IA. An honorary escort of twelve men—all fellow baseball players of deceased, escorted the remains to the church and cemetery, each one laden with armsful of flowers and floral pieces, mute tokens of the esteem in which the young man was held by his friends. One of the most notable floral pieces was a huge sphere, representing a baseball. It was composed of eighteen dozen carnations in white, with sweet peas forming the lines of the seams. The honorary escort consisted of Robert Maxwell, James and Will Clark, A. G. Wiebke, Archie Weilert, Henry Daum, Lester Wedemeier, Floyd Eberly, Vern Evans, Arthur Baie and Ray Evans. Out of respect to Mayor and Mrs. Schmidt, the aldermen, City Clerk and city treasurer attended in a body.
Pastor Hoefer spoke feelingly of the young man’s brief life. He gave his sermon in German and it was rich in pathos and consolation for the relatives who mourn the loss of the young man. Former Pastor Rathman spoke in English and his remarks assuaged the grief of those left behind. Pastor Diehl of the Methodist Church gave an eloquent prayer, and the music was by Mrs. Will Leifheit and Miss Stella Wedkemper, members of St. Paul’s choir.
Louis Schmidt was born February 27, 1891, and most all his life was spent in Hinckley. He attended the Hinckley schools, then went to Elmhurst College, later returning for advanced work in the Hinckley High School. A couple of years ago he went to Chicago to take up a good position in one of the big shoe houses, and while in the city he was smitten with tuberculosis. He came home, and every effort was made to offset the ravages of the dread disease. He went to various specialists and sanitariums, but to no avail, and Sunday afternoon (June 7, 1913) his young life was spent. He was the elder of two sons; leaving a younger brother, Edwin, and a sister, Mrs. John Minnich, besides his parents and grandmother.
Among the relatives from out of town to attend the funeral were—Mr. and Mrs. Harry Lutz of McIntire, IA; Mr. and Mrs. Leonard Schmidt of Riceville, IA; Mr. and Mrs. Fred Schoo and daughter of Somonauk; Harry Helwold of Chicago; Mr. and Mrs. Bert Schoo, Amel Schoo and Mrs. Betcher of Aurora.
HR 6/12/1913

Walter Rathmann 1913.06.15
Hinckley friends were apprised of the death of little Walter Rathmann, three year old son of Rev. and Mrs. E. Rathmann at the Chicago home Saturday (June 20, 1913). Mr. Rathmann is a former pastor of Sts. Paul and Peter Churches in Hinckley and Pierce, being succeeded by Rev. J. A. Hoefer, the present pastor.
The little fellow had been sick for some time and finally the meningitis developed, and the young life was taken. The funeral was held Monday.
Mr. Rathmann’s last visit to Hinckley was on the date of the funeral of Louis Schmidt, son of Mayor and Mrs. Schmidt, and he spoke feelingly at the service. His little boy was sick at that time.
Among those who attended the funeral in Chicago Monday from here were Mr. and Mrs. Fred M. Schmidt, Mr. and Mrs. Henry Weddige and Mrs. George Reimsnider. HR 6/26/1913

Adolph Stahl 1913.07.01
Another life is the toll for not having gates at the railroad crossings earlier in the day, or at a time when the fast passenger trains are due. The policy of the Burlington Railroad Company to save every dollar has cost a wife with five children, her only means of support.
Early Wednesday morning (July 2, 1913) Adolph Stahl was killed at the railroad crossing near the lumber yards of W. H. Norton & Co., at Somonauk. He was driving a team and hauling rock from the cars on to the road northeast of Somonauk where a hard road is being built. He had started north to cross the tracks when he was struck by the fast passenger train No. 12, due at Somonauk at 6:37 in the morning and which was ten minutes late and running at a high rate of speed to make up the lost time. Stahl did not see the train until it was upon him and he made an effort to clear the tracks but too late. The engine struck the wagon about the rear wheels, and throwing Mr. Stahl nearly one hundred feet east and on the north side of the tracks. The wagon was wrecked but the team escaped without injury.
Mr. Stahl was killed instantly, every bone in his body being broken. The body was removed to the undertaking rooms and the funeral services will be held this afternoon.
Mr. Stahl was a man of about 35 years of age and came to this country one year ago last February with his family, with Mr. and Mrs. Adolph Rompf who had been in Germany for a visit. Last year and this spring he worked for Mr. Rompf. Later he was helping John Stahl unload crushed rock and of late had been working for H. E. Peckman hauling crushed rock. He and his family occupied Mr. Peckman’s tenant house on his farm north of Somonauk.
Being a newcomer to this country, Mr. Stahl was not familiar with the hours for working the gates and because they were up thought the track could he could cross in safety. The gate man does not go to work until seven o’clock in the morning and the accident occurred just a few minutes before. As the greater number of the fast trains east bound pass through Somonauk before seven o’clock the gates should be operated earlier in the day.
The coroner’s jury censured the railroad company for negligence in not having the gate operated at that time.
The deceased was a hard working man and leaves a wife and five small children.
———————–
At the Dan Hampton home over the Fourth, his son and nephew were visitors. It runs in the blood of this family to be railroaders in one capacity or another, and these two men are also railroaders.
They were at work near Somonauk last week when the fast train on the main line hit the team and wagon driven by Mr. A. Stahl. Mr. Stahl was hurled over a hundred feet from the scene of the collision and instantly killed. Every bone in his body was broken by the fierce impact with the earth and death was instantaneous. The wagon was demolished, but the team of horses escaped with their lives, being cut clean from the wagon when the train first struck. Deceased was a cousin of the Stahl brothers who live in Hinckley—Dick, Ed and Rhinehardt.
Mr. Hampton’s relatives were working with a painting gang right near the accident when it happened, and they were witnesses at the inquest. The Hinckley relatives attended the funeral and a large circle of friends in this vicinity grieve with the widow and child in the loss of the father and husband.
HR 7/10/1913

Lula Minott 1913.07.12
Just as the curtain was dropping on Aurora’s splendid homecoming and fourth of July (July 4, 1913) celebration, an accident, costing the life of a well known young lady, occurred. With a party of friends, Miss Lula Minott, was watching the fireworks from the New York Street bridge, when a spark fell into a bunch of fireworks setting them off. A sky rocket struck Miss Minott in the breast. She was taken to a hospital where she died a few hours later, after suffering intense agony. Miss Minott was known to many in Sandwich.
——————-
Death and accidents followed in the wake of the Fourth of July celebrations in this neighborhood, and a young life has gone out at Aurora.
Miss Lulu Minott was with a party of friends at the foot of Stolp’s Island in Aurora the night of the fourth, watching the fireworks display which was being fired from the top of the New York Street bridge. In some unaccountable manner, a great collection of the rockets, candles and bombs became ignited from sparks of the set pieces, and there was a general hubbub and spitting and shooting of fire balls in all directions. One of the balls entered the breast of Miss Minott and exploded, lacerating her terribly and she died at 3:30 the following morning (July 5, 1913).
Miss Minott was a cousin of Zac Taylor, formerly of Hinckley. The funeral was held from the home Monday afternoon. A number of the Taylor family who formerly lived in this vicinity, connections of the late Cornelius Taylor, were among those who attended. Three brothers, sons of Cornelius Taylor, were here from Kansas City to attend the funeral. One of the boys, David Taylor is claim agent for the Union Pacific with headquarters at Kansas City. HR 7/10/1913

Lillian Sanderson 1913.07.18
A frightful accident occurred on the St. Paul branch of the CB & Q RR near Sugar Grove last Saturday night (July 26, 1913) when a fast train struck an auto driven by Seward Sanderson of Lee and loaded with members of his family out for a pleasure ride.
One little girl was killed instantly and another lies fatally injured in St. Charles Hospital. The list of the dead and injured from the terrible happening is:
Lillian Sanderson, aged 6 years, instantly killed.
Mrs. S. A. Sanderson, leg broken.
Violet Sanderson, aged 10 years, internally injured.
Anna Sanderson, aged 9 years, leg broken.
The other occupants of the car, beyond being severely shaken up were not seriously injured which is miraculous when everything is considered. The others in the machine, which was a big touring car, were Walter Sanderson, aged 11 years, Carrie Brown, Warren, two years old, Marion and the baby aged about two months.
Mr. Sanderson had been out with his family for a pleasant evening ride. They drove east to Aurora and were returning when the tragedy occurred.
At the Dugan crossing between Sugar Grove and Big Rock the road crosses the tracks of the St. Paul branch of the Burlington and Mr. Sanderson as he came up to the little elevation cut down the power of his engine so as not to jolt the occupants of the car in going over the tracks.
It happened that a lot of cinders and loose gravel had been placed right at the crossing and when the machine struck this pile of loose material it choked the engine and the machine came to a stop right on the crossing.
Sanderson got down from the drivers seat to crank the engine and as he glanced down the track he saw the headlight of a fast express train bearing down on him at a mile a minute clip.
Screaming to his wife and children to jump, Sanderson ran around behind the car and tried to push it off the rails, and nearly had it off the trace, the engine hitting the rear wheels.
Lillian Sanderson, six years old was instantly killed, and her four year old sister, Viola, was probably fatally injured, but the other six persons in the car escaped death as if by a miracle, Mrs. Sanderson and Anna being the only ones to suffer any injuries more serious than superficial bruises.
The mother was internally injured but when removed to the Aurora hospital, seemed to have a splendid chance of recovery.
Miss Brown and three children, Walter, eleven years old; Anna, nine and Warren, two, were hurled more than 100 feet with the wreckage of the car, and when the train was stopped they were found lying dazed on the ground. They soon revived and were able to walk about.
A two months old baby boy, who had been asleep in his mother’s lap when the train struck the auto, was picked up seventy feet from the scene of the accident. He was crying lustily, but was found to be without a scratch.
A special train was made up and Mrs. Sanderson and her injured daughter, Viola, were rushed to St. Joseph’s Hospital in Aurora, while the dead girl’s body was removed to a morgue in the same city. None of the others required medical attention, although, Mr. Sanderson was on the verge of prostration from grief.
——————
One of the most terrible accidents that ever happened on this line of the Burlington occurred Saturday night (July 26, 1913) about eleven o’clock at “Death’s Crossing,” near the farm residence of the Dugan brothers, when Mr. and Mrs. Seward A. Sanderson, six children and their hired girl were returning to the farm home near Lee from Aurora.
The Sandersons were driving the big seven passenger Case car—a $3,000 machine—which was virtually new, and were coming west.
During the afternoon of Saturday, the repair men of the track department had unloaded a carload of fresh cinders on both approaches of the crossing. As the big machine came into the cinders on the east side of the track, “running on high,” and going slow, the engine was killed. The momentum of the heavy car and its load carried the front wheels over the rails on the opposite side of the track.
From Mr. Sanderson’s statement to Mr. Dugan, who was interviewed by a Review and Leader representative Sunday morning, it appears that as soon as the engine died, with his younger son who was riding in the front seat with him, he got out andhurried to the rear of the car, and the two attempted to push it off the tracks. If they could have moved the car five or six feet to the west, the accident would have been averted. In the excitement of stopping dead still on a railroad track, and being attracted by the lights of their own machine, the father and son did not notice the approaching light of the fast express until it was almost on them. The father yelled to his wife and the children to jump for their lives, but it was too late. He and the boy jumped back, and with a crash, the fast train hit the automobile.
In the back of the car were Mrs. Sanderson and the children. Most of them were cuddled up together and asleep, never dreaming that so tragic an ending would be made to their Saturday evening trip.
The car was demolished, with the exception of the engine, which did not seem to be injured in the least. The great body of the auto was smashed into kindling wood, and when the impart came it hurled the body of little Lillian Sanderson, eight years old, a distance of eighty feet west of the track. Her body was picked up by the trainmen and the half crazed father. The little two months old baby was hurled a distance of twenty feet from the wrecked car but did not seem to be injured in the least. The mother suffered a broken leg and other severe bruises, and little Viola was so badly injured internally that she is not expected to live. The other children with the exception of the older son and the assistant in the Sanderson home were all injured, and it is a miracle that the mother and the children were not instantly killed.
Many Hinckley people know the Sanderson family well. They are well to do farmers, living about a mile north of Lee, and the death and accident are a great blow to the father who was compelled to jump for his own life and had to stand by, helpless, and see the great steam monster plunge into the auto containing his wife and children. All during Sunday, numberless machines, filled with friends and relatives of the family, came through Waterman and Hinckley to the scene of the accident.
HR 7/31/1913

Wilbur Walker 1913.08.16
Wilbur Walker accidentally caught a live telephone wire while working in DeKalb and received electric current enough to electrocute him.
He was unmarried and thirty five years old; was born in London, Canada, but has made Illinois his home for eighteen years. Six years he was employed as motorman on the Aurora street cars, but he accepted the superintending of the DeKalb County Telephone Company’s repairing last March, after the two sleet and wind storms. He finished the work in Waterman about a week ago and was assisting the DeKalb foreman when he was killed. He understood the danger of the position and was always careful that no accidents happened. His parents are dead but he leaves three sisters and two brothers, Mrs. Cyrus Dixon, Mrs. D, A. Feller, Miss Louise Walker and Joseph Walker of Waterman, and Harvey Walker of Moose Jaw, Saskatchewan. Burial was at Waterman. –Sandwich Free Press August 28, 1913
——————
Early Tuesday evening the word was phoned to Waterman and Hinckley that Wilbur Walker had been killed instantly while working at this trade as an electrician for the DeKalb County Telephone Company in DeKalb. The news brought grief to a wide circle of friends around this end of the county as he was a popular man with all who knew him.
Wilbur Walker was a big hearted fellow. He was always pleasant and genial, and his friends were numbered by the score. Around Hinckley and Waterman he was widely known, especially among the younger set, with whom he was always popular, and he will be greatly missed by his friends and relatives.
Concerning the accident the Waterman corespondent says:
Wokbur Walker accidentally caught a live telephone wire Tuesday afternoon (August 19, 1913) while working in DeKalb and received electric current enough to electrocute him.
He was unmarried and thirty five years old; was born in London, Canada but has made Illinois his home for eighteen years. Six years he was employed as motorman on the Aurora street cars, but he accepted the superintending of the DeKalb County Telephone Conpany’s repairing last March, after the two sleet and wind storms. He finished the work in Waterman about a week ago and was assisting the DeKalb foreman when he was killed. He understood the danger of the position and was always careful that no accidents might happen. His parents are dead but he leaves three sisters, and two brothers–Mrs. Cyrus Dixon, Mrs. D. A. Fuller, Miss Louise Walker and Joseph Walker of Waterman and Harry Walker of Moose Jaw, Saskatchewan. Burial will be at Waterman. HR 8/21/1913

Jacob Morsch 1913.08.21
Tuesday evening (August 12, 1913) about eight o’clock, Jacob Morsch passed away at his home on Lincoln Avenue after a long and active life, in which he amassed a comfortable fortune and won and held the esteem of all his friends and neighbors.
Jacob Morsch was one of those staunch German farmers who came to America in the early day, and by industry and frugality, built up, not only his private fortune, but aided materially in the development of the community where he settled. He was born at Baden, Germany, October 29, 1833, and came to America in 1847. He settled first near Ottawa, LaSalle County, then came to DeKalb County in 1868, settling in Squaw Grove Township on the old home farm now occupied by his son John C. Morsch. He was married November 25, 1860, and on the fiftieth anniversary of the date, in 1910, all the children and grandchildren with a few exceptions gathered at the home to help the mother and father enjoy the day. Twenty five grandchildren and three great grandchildren were present on that occasion.
He is survived by his widow and his children—Henry Morsch, John Morsch, Mrs. Herman Reimsnider, W. J. Morsch, Harry Morsch and Mrs. Dewey Grove, besides the grandchildren and great grandchildren.
The funeral will be held Friday afternoon at St. Paul’s Church at one o’clock, and both pastors Diehl and Hoefner will participate in the service. The bearers will be six of the grandsons, and interment will be made in the family lot at the U.P. Cemetery. HR 8/14/1913
——————
The funeral of the late Jacob Morsch Friday drew many sorrowing friends and relatives from a distance to Hinckley. Without question, Mr. Morsch was one of the best loved men in this section, and for many years he has held a high place in the esteem of his neighbors and friends. Interment was made in the U. P. Cemetery, one of the finest cemeteries in this part of the state.
Among those present from out of town were: Joseph Morsch, Christ Erhler, Mr. Bruntner and Mr. Dolder of Earlville; Mr. and Mrs. Jacob Schmidt, George and Louise Schmidt of Ottawa; Mr. and Mrs. Jacobson of DeKalb; Mrs. Kemper and daughter, Esther of Serena; Mr. and Mrs. Will Dolder of Plano; Mrs. Nelia Hiss and Miss Sophia Jennie of Chicago; Mrs. Gurnser and Herman of Elgin; Mrs. Joseph Morsch, son and daughter, and Mrs. Mary Dolder, Charles Morsch and Herman Dolder of Sheridan. HR 8/21/1913

Mary J. Telford Perry 1913.08.22
Mrs. Jerome B. Perry died in Topeka, KS, August 13, 1913, after and illness of less than a week, with septic pneumonia. Funeral services were held Sunday at Paradise by Rev Lundy, and interment was made in Mt. Herman Cemetery.
Mary J. Telford was born March 9, 1850 at Dorset, IL. September 5, 1868 she was married to J. B. Perry. Two children were born to them, one of whom died in infancy and the other, Elmer, in 1893.
The husband, and an adopted daughter, Miss Mabel Perry; a sister, Amelia Telford of Los Angeles; two brothers, D. W. Telford and H. H. Telford, of Mason City, IA, survive her.
The deceased came to Russell County in March 1879, with her husband and settled on a farm two and one half miles southwest of Paradise. This was their home until March 1908, when they moved to Topeka where they have since lived.—Russell County (Kansas) Record. HR 9/4/1913

Fred Baier 1913.08.23
Fred Baier of DeKalb, died at his home Wednesday (August 29, 1913) following an operation for appendicitis. He was about sixty years of age. Mr. Baier was an uncle of Peter and Henry Daum of Hinckley, and the funeral will be held Friday morning.
HR 9/4/1913

Maximillian Liljenstrand 1913.09.08
(Max Lillie)
Aviator Maximillian Liljenstrand, better known as Max Lillie, was almost instantly killed on the Galesburg District Fair Grounds early Monday afternoon (September 15, 1913) in the presence of his wife and five thousand spectators as he was trying out his aeroplane preliminary to a flight later in the day.
At the moment of the accident he had been making a circle of the field and was about 150 feet high. The machine was two hundred feet east of the grandstand. Occupying one of the seats of which, and in full view of the machine was his wife.
Just before he reached the grandstand it appeared as if he was about to alight in the crowd and evidently he appeared to be afraid to come down because of the crowd.
He then ascended some distance and as he made a turn the north wind caught the right wing and caused it to snap and break. The machine turned turtle and came down with a crash, pinning Lillie to the ground.
Spectators rushed to the field and lifted the unconscious form of the aviator from the wreckage. He was bleeding from the nose and mouth, and the physician who examined him said that nearly every bone in his body was broken. He died within three minutes of the time of the fall.
Mrs. Liljenstrand was so deeply affected when she saw the body that she fainted. A physician’s services were required.
Maximillian Liljenstrand came to this country from Sweden about ten years ago and settled in St. Louis, starting as a street laborer. Through political influences there he organized the Lillie Construction Company and secured large street paving contracts.
About four years ago he entered the aviation game, organizing the Pioneer Aviation Company. This organization purchased a machine from the Wright Brothers and Andrew Drew, who was killed last June, and Walter Brookins were hired to fly in it. They entered the 1911 carnival on the lake front, but the profits from the venture did not satisfy Lillie. He discharged both men and two years ago learned to fly himself at Kinloch Field, St. Louis.
The following year Lillie came to Chicago and started the aviation school at Cicero and, according to officials of the Illinois Aero Club, taught more men to fly than any aviator in the country. It is also said he carried more passengers than any other birdman.
It was Max Lillie who made the flights at the Sandwich Fair Grounds a year ago. Not being able to ship his machine from the aviation field, he flew out from Chicago to the fair grounds making a most sensational flight and one that was chronicled all over the country. He was a gentlemanly fellow and while here made many friends who are grieved at his sudden death.
———————
Max Lillie, one of the best known aviators of this country, was almost instantly killed when he fell with his machine at Galesburg Monday (September 15, 1913). It will be remembered by many hereabouts that Lillie flew from Chicago to Sandwich last year during the fair in order to make the flights advertised by the association.
He was a young man, of Swedish birth, and came to this country about ten years ago, going into the aviation business about four years ago. It is claimed that he has taught more aviators to fly than any other known bird man in the United States. He is the instigator of the plan to establish the aviation fields at Cicero, near Chicago, where he has made flights many times, as well as his students, in full view of the home of Mr. and Mrs. Roy Beitel, formerly of Hinckley. HR 9/18/1913

John M. Ward 1913.09.09
With the passing away of John M. Ward, at Hinckley, Wednesday morning, September 10, 1913, another one of the early settlers of this section of Illinois has been called. He came to the Prairie state in 1830, when the famous Indian Chief, Black Hawk, had aroused his warriors of Illinois and Wisconsin to massacre the whites, and at the time when old Chief Shabbona showed his loyalty to the conquering race. Those were trying times in Illinois, and not many of our people are left who remember them.
Mr. Ward was born June 4, 1828, at Newark, Licking County, OH, and two or three years later came west to Illinois. He was in the fort at Sandyhook for three months during the spring and summer of 1832. From there he went to Bloomington, where he resided for fourteen years and in 1884 move to Squaw Grove Township. One son, Stewart Ward, of Hinckley and a daughter, Mrs. T. A. Johnson, of Batavia, survive him. The latter will be known in Sandwich as Miss Georgie Ward.
——————–
Mr. John Ward, aged 85 years and some months, passed away at the home of his daughter, Mrs. F. A. Johnson, in Batavia Wednesday morning (September 10, 1913) at 6:30 o’clock. Mr. Ward has been helpless for three or four weeks, when he was stricken with paralysis, and there has been but little hope held out for his recovery since then.
His son, S. B Ward of The Review office, has been with his father almost constantly since the fatal stroke.
The funeral will be held from the Baptist Church in Hinckley Saturday afternoon at 2 o’clock. Pastor Watson will be assisted by Rev. W. W. Diehl of the Methodist Church and interment will be made at Greenwood Cemetery. HR 9/11/1913
——————–
With the passing away of Mr. John M. Ward, Wednesday morning, September 10, 1913, another one of the early settlers of this section of Illinois has been called. He came to the prairie state in 1830, when the famous Indian chief, Black Hawk, had aroused his warriors of Illinois and Wisconsin to massacre the whites, and at the time when old Chief Shabbona showed his loyalty to the conquering race. Those were trying times in Illinois, and not many of our people are left who remember them.
Mr. Ward was born June 4, 1828 at Newark, Licking County, OH, and two or three years later came “west” to Illinois. He was in the fort at Sandyhook for three months during the spring and summer of 1832. From there he went to Bloomington, where he resided for fourteen years and in 1844 he moved to Squaw Grove Township. His next change was made two years later when he moved to Long Grove, now Pavilion, about three miles south of Yorkville, and it was at the Kendall County seat that he was married in November 17, 1869, to Miss Josephine Burell of Little Rock.
In 1876 Mr. and Mrs. Ward moved to Hinckley to make their permanent home, and here he has lived ever since. At the time of his death he and his good wife were visiting at the home of their daughter, Mrs. F. A. Johnson, in Batavia.
For many months Mr. Ward had been suffering the infirmities coincident with his advanced age, and some three or four weeks ago he had a stroke of paralysis. It is believed that this was his second stroke. He hovered between life and death for about three weeks, and everything possible was done that human hands can do. His delivery was a merciful visitation of the death angel.
He is survived by his widow and two children—Mrs. F. A. Johnson of Batavia and Steward B. Ward of Hinckley.
He was a member of the Hinckley Baptist Church for many years, and it was at this church that the funeral services were held Saturday afternoon, conducted by Pastor Watson, assisted by Rev. W. W. Diehl of the Methodist Church. The bearers were John B. Bauder, Charles Leifheit, John Jones, William Ashton, William Rees and George Potter. Music was by Mrs. Kennedy, Mrs. Fry and Mrs. Dewey.
Among those here from out of town were Mrs. Smith of Rockford, Mrs. Newton and daughter of Sandwich; Mrs. Anna Ward and daughter, Belle of Aurora; Mr. and Mrs. Ed Rees of Aurora; Mr. and Mrs. John Williams of Aurora; Mr. and Mrs. Fred Burrell of Aurora; Mrs. Anna Lafferty of Aurora; Mrs. Henry Earsfeldt and son of Amboy; Mr. and Mrs. H. Lafferty of Amboy; Mrs. Edward Lafferty of Amboy; Mr. and Mrs. Grant Ramer of Paw Paw. HR 9/18/1913

Herbert Otto Prussing 1913.10.12
Mr. William Prussing, of Somonauk, received a message yesterday afternoon telling of a terrific mine explosion at Dawson, NM, in which his son, Herbert Prussing, was employed. The telegram stated that Herbert was in the mine. Mr. Prussing had intended leaving this afternoon for Dawson, but his departure is delayed on account of the serious condition Mrs. Prussing who is prostrated as a result of the news.
The Chicago Tribune of this morning had the following to say of the explosion:
Two hundred and thirty miners were entombed in shaft No. 2 of the Stag Canon Mines at Dawson, NM, when an explosion occurred at the property at 3 o’clock Wednesday afternoon (October 22, 1913).
Two of this number, found on an upper level, were taken from the mine tonight.
Rescuers are arriving from all parts of the southern Colorado coal fields.
The cause of the explosion is unknown. Fire has not broken out, it is believed, though smoke is issuing from the second level of the shaft. It is believed by rescuers that the smoke is from the explosion.
Immediately after the explosion all shifts were called to the rescue. Miners employed in other shafts were put to work drilling through the tons of debris which has blocked the mine below the second level. Calls for assistance have been issued.
The United States rescue car stationed at Trinidad has been summoned. Word has been received that F. L. Miller, superintendent of the Colorado Fuel and Iron Company rescue department, with a crew of trained men, is on the way there.
All persons in Dawson who are able to work are at the mine siding in the attempt to reach the entombed miners. There is nothing to indicate whether the 228 miners are dead or alive, and the rescuers are working hard to supply air to the buried men.
It has been impossible to ascertain at which level the explosion occurred, but the mine shaft is blocked from the second level.
No less than five mines are connected in the workings and it is thought if any of the men escaped the explosion they can find their way to safety.
The mine property is owned by the Phelps Dodge Company, of New York.
The Chicago papers this morning (Friday) say there is but little hope of any of the miners being taken out alive.
–Sandwich Free press October 23, 1913
A telegram was received here Tuesday morning from William Prussing from Dawson, NM, announcing that they had found the remains of Herbert Prussing, who was in the Stag Canon Mine at Dawson when the explosion occurred last Wednesday. The message stated he tried to have the remains shipped here, but the railroad company would not accept them for shipment on account of the decomposed condition of the body. It is thought Mr. Prussing, if he fails to get the body shipped, will bury the body at Dawson for the present and later on will have the remains shipped here. Mrs. Prussing has been very ill since the first message was received. Surely the family have the sympathy of all in this hour of sadness.
Herbert Otto Prussing was born in Somonauk, March 2, 1885, and met his death in the explosion the Stag Canon Mine at Dawson, NM, October 22, 1913. Most of his life had been spent in this vicinity, and it was only on March 2 of this year he went to Dawson and had gotten a job in the office of the coal company. Herbert was a promising and ambitious young man and had friends by the score and it was only with expressions of sadness that they learned of his sad and untimely death. –Sandwich Free Press October 30, 1913
Somonauk Reveille: William Prussing and Edward Rompf arrived Saturday from Dawson, NM, where they took charge of the remains of Herbert Prussing, who met his death in a coal mine in that city two weeks ago.
Mr. Prussing’s body was found two miles back in the mine, where he and a young man from Ohio had been operating a machine used in sawing beneath huge blocks of coal preparatory to blowing it out with dynamite. He and his co-worker were evidently running the machine at the time of the explosion and were facing each other, as the left side of the face of on and the right side of the face of the other were filled with coal dust, which were the only disfigurations caused by the terrible explosion. No bones were broken and their clothing was intact, making identification very easy.
They were working as far from the entrance as it was possible to get and the explosion occurred about half way between them and the entrance, or about one mile from the place where they were working.
Mr. Prussing had been working in the mine only 28 days when the fatal explosion occurred.
The remains were given temporary burial at Dawson, from which place they will be brought to Somonauk next spring..
–Sandwich Free Press November 13, 1913
—————-
Among the victims of the terrible mine disaster at Dawson, NM, last week, was Herbert Prussing, son of Mr. and Mrs. William Prussing of Somonauk. The young man is well known in these parts in baseball circles, as he was a former pitcher for the Somonauk club, and also pitched for the other clubs of this neighborhood in a good many games.
Mr. Prussing was a great friend of Charles Heifner of Aurora, formerly of Hinckley, and was acting as Mr. Heifner’s agent in the New Mexico country, selling jewelry and diamonds as a side line while carrying on his regular work at the mines.
The explosion occurred in shaft No. 3 of the Stag Canon Mine. It was deafening in its intensity, and no cause has been determined, aside from the supposition that it was an accumulation of gases. Over 200 miners were entombed, most of whom were Italians, but there were several Americans, including young Prussing and the general superintendent, Frank McDermotte. HR 10/30/1913
—————–
A telegram was received here Tuesday morning from William Prussing from Dawson, NM, announcing that they had found the remains of Herbert Prussing, who was in the stag Canon Mine at Dawson when the explosion occurred last Wednesday. The message stated he tried to have the remains shipped here, but the railroad company would not accept them for shipment on account of the decomposed condition of the body. It is thought Mr. Prussing, if he fails to get the body shipped, will bury the body at Dawson for the present and later on will have the remains shipped here. Mrs. Prussing has been very ill since the first message was received.
Herbert Otto Prussing was born in Somonauk March 2, 1885, and met his death in the explosion of the Stag Canon Mine at Dawson, NM, October 22, 1913. Most of his life had been spent in this vicinity, and it was only March 2 of this year he went to Dawson and had gotten a job in the office of the coal company. Herbert was a promising and ambitious young man and had friends by the score and it was only with expressions of sadness that they learned of his sad and untimely death. HR 11/6/1913

Elias Tuntland 1913.10.14
Eli Tuntland, the 17 year old son of Mr. and Mrs. T. J. Tuntland, who farm the Mrs. R. R. Brown farm south of Waterman, died quite suddenly Saturday (October 25, 1913) of what is known as walking typhoid fever. He has been ill for two weeks, but has been up and about and was apparently not seriously ill until just before he died, when he suddenly collapsed. He was well known and liked hereabouts. The funeral was held Sunday afternoon at two o’clock from his late home and the remains taken to Leland for burial.
——————-
Eli, sixteen year old son of Mr. and Mrs. T. J. Tuntland, died Friday, October 24, 1913 from typhoid fever. A short service was held at the home Sunday morning followed by the regular service at the Leland Lutheran Church, by Rev. Johnson. George and Everett Stryker, Charles Carnes and Adelbert Garner, schoolmates and friends, were pall bearers, and burial was at Leland. Surviving are his parents, four brothers and two sisters. HR 10/30/1913

John Normandin 1913.10.19
Sympathizing friends were grieved to learn of John Normandin’s death. He was the youngest son of Mr. and Mrs. Peter Normandin, and was born 42 years ago. While at the Minnesota State Fair, when he had charge of a large exhibit and demonstration for the International Harvester Company, he began feeling sick. Typhoid fever developed; he was cared for at the St. Joseph Infirmary at Aurora for two weeks. Funeral and burial was held at Plano Friday (October 3, 1913). Surviving are his wife, formerly Miss Louise Slater, of West Pullman, and little daughter, Irene; also his mother of Waterman, now 80 years of age, and the following brothers and sisters:–Levi Normandin, Jackson, MI; Edward Normandin, Ellsworth, IA; Samuel Normandin, Plano; Mrs. Emma Migells, Plano; Mrs. Charles Fuller and Miss Julia Normandin of Waterman.
HR 10/9/1913

Lloyd Archie Price 1913.10.20
Poison berries, believed to be those of wild ivy, killed Lloyd Archie Price, six year old son of Mr. and Mrs. A. E. Price of Oswego Wednesday (October 8, 1913). The youngster found the berries along the fence as he returned from school Tuesday evening. The funeral was held Friday and those attending from here were Miss Ency Price, Mrs. L. G. Fuller and Miss Emma Woods. HR 10/16/1913

Frank Finley Morse 1913.10.21
Many sympathizing friends braved the inclement weather Monday afternoon and attended the funeral of F. F. Morse at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Cyrus Woods, Rev. C. F. Graeser of the Waterman Methodist Church delivering the address and songs were sung by F. D. Greeley, Rollin Fay, Miss Mabel Hipple and Mrs. F. A. Brown. The flowers were beautiful, coming from the Mason, Woodmen and Mystic Workers and from relatives and friends. Interment was at Clinton Cemetery and E. P. Dean Orvis Stryker, John Mercer and William Richmond were the bearers.
Frank Finley Morse was born in Shabbona 61 years ago September 5, living in that community until fifteen years ago when he moved to Waterman. While at this place he was engaged in the well digging and windmill business. In 1880 he was united in marriage to Miss Emma Morse; to them three children were born. Three years ago, Mr. Morse embarked in farming at Buffalo, MT. His health began failing twelve months ago and last August he returned to Illinois, hoping the change would be a benefit.
His death occurred Thursday, October 23, 1913. In youth he was s member of the Congregational Church at Shabbona; while in Waterman the family was associated with the Methodist society. He was affiliated with the Masons, Eastern Star,, Modern Woodmen and Mystic Workers and carried several thousand dollars of insurance in the last two orders. Those who mourn his passing are the wife, who has worked untiringly for every comfort during his illness, and the three children—Mrs. Jennie Woods of this vicinity; Miss Elsie and Winn of Buffalo, MT; also three grandchildren, and the following brothers and sisters—Glyde of DeKalb, Willis of Portland, OR, Lewellyn of Sibley, IA, Mrs. Galloway of Xenia, OH, Mrs. Brown of Grinnell, IA, Mrs. Ore and Mrs. Good of Shabbona.
HR 10/30/1913

Henry Von Ohlen 1913.11.01
The funeral services of the late Henry Von Ohlen were held at his home last Friday afternoon at 1:30 o’clock, conducted by Rev. Sininger. The deceased was born in Wenzen, Dukedom, Brunswick, Germany June 27, 1838, and at the age of 17 years he came to America locating at Sandwich, IL October 30, 1855, and in October 1865 he was united in marriage to Miss Caroline Reickert. The couple located on a farm in Victor Township after their marriage upon which place they resided until their removal to Somonauk January 13, 1896, where they have since resided. Besides the wife, five children are left to mourn his loss, one son H. J. Von Ohlen of Victor; Mrs. E. E. Arnold of Sandwich; Mrs. H. E. Arnold of Oregon; Mrs. Arthur Hazeman of Leland, and Miss Alice Von Ohlen. Besides the children, the following from out of town attended the funeral; Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Von Ohlen, Mrs. Minnie Baie, Iwet Bohler, Mr. and Mrs. Herman Baie, Mr. and Mrs. Clarence Troeger, Mr. and Mrs. Fred Riminsnider, Mr. and Mrs. Morsch and Mr. and Mrs. August Riminsnider of Hinckley; Mr. and Mrs. Carl Baie, Waterman; Mrs. Aurelia Reimer, Chicago; Mrs. Louis Von Ohlen, Ernest Von Ohlen, Mr. and Mrs. Chas. Olson, Mrs. Richard Parks and Mrs. A. Betting, Leland; Herman Ebrecht, Oswego; Mrs. Frank Skinner and Mrs. Spickerman, Sandwich.
———————-
Regarding the death of Mr. Henry VonOhlen, the Somonauk Reveille says:
“Mr. VonOhlen was born in Wenzen Dukedom, Brunswick, Germany, June 27, 1838, and at the age of 14 years united with the German Lutheran church. He came to America at the age of 17 years, locating at Sandwich October 30, 1855, and in October 1865. he was united in marriage to Miss Caroline Leickert. The couple located on the Henry VonOhlen homestead in Victor Township after their marriage and continued their residence there until their removal to Somonauk January 13, 1896, where they have since resided.
Six children were born to Mr. and Mrs. VonOhlen, one of whom died in infancy. One son, H. J. VonOhlen, four daughters, Mrs. E. E. Arnold, Sandwich; Mrs. H. E. Arnold, Oregon; Mrs. Arthur Hazemann, Leland, and Miss Alice VonOhlen, nine children and one great grandchild are left to share the sorrows of the bereaved wife He is also survived by two brothers, William of Hinckley and Christ of Victor; one sister, Mrs. Minnie Baie of Hinckley and a large circle of friends in this community.
Among those who attended the funeral were Mr. and Mrs. William VonOhlen, Mr. and Mrs. Arvid VonOhlen, Arvie Boller, Mrs. Christ Baie and family, August Baie and family, Mr. and Mrs. H. H. Baie, Mr. and Mrs. Louis Baie, Mr. and Mrs. Carl Baie, Mr. and Mrs. Henry Morsch, Mr. and Mrs. Albert Reimsnider, Herman Ebrecht of Bristol, Mr. and Mrs. Charles Reimsnider, Mr. and Mrs. Fred Reimsnider, Mr. and Mrs. Henry Wahlgren, Mr. and Mrs. Charles Darnell, Mr. and Mrs. Frank Wagner, Mrs. Ed Ramer of Chicago, Mr. and Mrs. Henry Manser, Mayor Fred Schmidt, William Baie and a great many friends from this locality.” HR 11/27/1913

Rosie Reingardt 1913.11.19
Rosie, oldest daughter of Mr. and Mrs. William Reingardt, died Friday near midnight (November 7, 1913) at Dr. Wilkinson’s hospital, where she underwent an operation two days before. For a month she has been unable to work. During the past summer she has lived in Waterman, forming many acquaintances who will remember her as a pleasant, conscientious young lady.
She was born in Clinton Township 20 years ago last month, and is the oldest girl in a family of eleven children, who with her parents, will sorely miss her. The young lady was engaged to Hugh Quigley, and they were to be married at holiday time.
The funeral was held Tuesday forenoon–a prayer service at 10 a.m. at the home of her parents, followed by the regular service at the German Lutheran church, Rev. Kroeger having charge of both. The flowers were beautiful; burial was at Clinton Cemetery. HR 11/13/1913

Edward Chapman 1913.11.20
Edward Chapman, electrician of the Aurora, Elgin & Chicago Railroad Company, a cousin of Mrs. Cyrus Dixon, Mrs. D. A. Fuller and Miss Louise Walker, was killed Friday (November 7, 1913) ten miles east of Elgin when the gasoline speeder on which he was riding, jumped the track and turned turtle. In the tumble, Mr. Chapman struck his head and his body fell across the current rail of the track. Death was instantaneous. He was 35 years old and lived at Aurora. Surviving are his wife, one son and three little daughters. William Dixon, Mrs. Charles Stryker, Miss Louise Walker and Kenneth Dixon attended the funeral Monday. HR 11/13/1913

Thomas Metz 1913.11.21
Little Tommy Metz, adopted son of Mr. and Mrs. John Metz, who lives in the western suburb—the old town—passed away at the Metz home Thursday night (November 14, 1913), the affliction being a complication of appendicitis and stoppage of the bowels.
The little fellow was the son of Pete Johnson and his late wife, the latter passing away several years ago. He was taken into the Metz home, and was given the best of care and training by Mr. and Mrs. Metz. He was a bright little follow, and was rapidly taking on the good lessons they were teaching him. His death is a severe sadness to them, and to the father and the little sister who survive him.
The funeral services were held in the First Methodist Episcopal Church, Hinckley, November 16, on his eighth birthday. The church was filled with sympathizing friends and neighbors. Interment was in the Welch Cemetery at Big Rock.
HR 11/20/1913

Elizabeth Caroline Coffin Patten 1913.11.22
Mr. and Mrs. F. S. Greeley attended the funeral of their mother at DeKalb Tuesday. Mrs. Sylvester Patten was known to a large circle of pioneer citizens at Waterman. She had been ill for many years and death relieved her suffering Monday, November 24, 1913.
Elizabeth Caroline Coffin was born July 10, 1839 at Roxbury, Delaware County, NY; when three years old, her parents moved to Illinois and settled near Belvidere, where she received her education. May 1, 1860, she was married to Sylvester Patten, who passed to his reward March 20, 1910. Mrs. Patten has lived in DeKalb since 1893 and is survived by five children—Frank and Edith, Mrs. M. D. Shipman, Mrs. C. F. Toenniges of DeKalb, and Mrs. F. S. Greeley of Waterman
HR 11/27/1913

Joseph A. Nolan 1913.12.04
Joseph Nolan, for several years publisher of the Shabbona Chief, and known among the newspaper fraternity of DeKalb County as “Uncle Joe” committed suicide last night (December 17, 1913) by hanging himself in the press room of his newspaper plant.
He stood upon a chair and threw the end of the rope over a shaft that runs the presses and then kicked the chair from beneath him. He was found about seven o’clock in the evening when members of his family went to call him for supper.
——————–
Joseph A. Nolan, better known in political circles as “Uncle Joe,” editor of the Shabbona Chief and The Lee Standard, was found dead at seven o’clock last night (December 17, 1913) by members of his family. He was hanging by a rope about his neck, which had been fastened to an overhead shafting in the press room of his plant.
It is believed that despondency over financial matters and lack of business prompted the newspaper man to commit the act.
Mr. Nolan was known among the fraternity as the “eccentric of the press.” He had strong ideas along some lines which conflicted with those of other newspaper man. He had written several life sketches of prominent public men, and took a lively interest in the political affairs of DeKalb and Lee Counties.
Yesterday forenoon he conversed rationally with his competitor, Mr. W. H. Ray of the Shabbona Express for the first time in many months, and the two editors mutually agreed to omit an issue of the paper during Christmas week. After his talk with Mr. Ray, Mr. Nolan returned to his plant where he evidently resumed his work. It is not known just what time in the evening he planned and executed the suicide.
In 1912 Mr. Nolan was a candidate for member of the lower house of the state legislature against Abbott of Whiteside County and Tourtillott of Lee County.
About three years ago he suffered a distressing accident while accompanied by his small son on a business trip to Lee. He was conversing with a farmer and was standing in the door of a barn. The young son noticed a shot gun standing against the wall; picked it up; the muzzle dropped to the right range and in some way his finger pulled the trigger. The charge blew off a portion of the back of the head of his father, and for many months it was thought he could not live. He survived, however, to resume his newspaper work and take his own life. He leaves a widow and six children, the oldest a girl fifteen years of age. Mr. Nolan was between forty and forty five years of age.
HR 12/18/1913

M. C. Johnson 1913.12.14
About 5:30 o’clock last night (December 3, 1913) M. C. Johnson died at his home north of Hinckley. Mr. Johnson was one of the best known men in this township and the father of ten children. Those surviving are the widow, four sons and five daughters besides two brothers and sisters.
The funeral will be held from the late home Saturday at 12 o’clock noon and interment will be made at Greenwood Cemetery. The news comes so shortly before going to press that we will give obituary data next week. Mr. Johnson had a host of friends and many extend sincere sympathy to the relatives in his passing away. HR 12/4/1913

Albert Weilert 1913.12.15
One of the saddest deaths that has occurred in this part of DeKalb County in any years is that of Albert Weilert, eldest son of Mr. and Mrs. William Weilert of Hinckley, who died at the East Side Hospital in Waterman Saturday afternoon, December 3, 1913, following an operation performed a week before for appendicitis. At times it was thought that “Bert” as he was popularly known, would recover from the illness, but typhoid fever developed shortly after the operation, and it is thought this complication primarily caused his death.
Albert Weilert was one of the most popular young farmers in this vicinity. He was the eldest son and brother of a large family—all of whom are well known and highly esteemed for their many amiable qualities. He was born on the Weilert homestead farm November 6, 1876, and has spent all of his life here. Married to Miss Carrie Baler November 26, 1862, he was the father of five children, two of whom preceded him in death. The children surviving him are Kenneth, Jeanette and Jessie.
Just three weeks before his death he was taken to the Waterman Hospital succeeding a sudden attack of appendicitis. The physicians and nursed did everything possible to save his life, and with his rugged constitution the case looked very hopeful. A short time after, however, the dreaded typhoid developed, and from then on to the end it was a battle of medical and surgical skill against nature.
The funeral was held at the Squaw Grove Lutheran Church, of which he has long been an active member, Monday afternoon, following brief service at the home. Pastor Kroeger had charge of the service. It was a beautiful service, and the great church was packed with friends and relatives of the young man. The pastor read his text and preached his sermon in both German and English, and he feelingly dwelt on the upright character of the deceased and the many lessons that may be learned by those who remain after him.
Interment was made in the family lot of the Lutheran Cemetery.
Besides the sorrowing widow and children who will always remember “Bert,” are his father and mother of Hinckley; Mrs. William G. Smith, Mrs. Ed Meyers, Mrs. C. R. Hastie, Charles, William, Arch and Harve Weilert—the brothers and sisters of the young man.
The bearers were Ernest Hartman, E. A. Leifheit, Eli Boekenhauer, Charles Leifheit, John Rissman, and Leonard Rissman.
Among those from a distance who attended the funeral were—Mr. Peters and Mrs. Wheeler of Chicago; Mr. and Mrs. John Weiss, Mrs. VanVleet, John Weiss, Jr., Mr. and Mrs. Richard Hunt of Aurora; John Daum, Mr. and Mrs. Albert Daum, Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Daum, Mr. and Mrs. Ed. Daum, Mr. and Mrs. Will Daum and families, Miss Tillie Daum, Mr. and Mrs. Albert Bates and Mr. and Mrs. Albert Kennedy of Steward; Mrs. Fred Baier, Mrs. John Jordon, Fred and Walter Baler of DeKalb; Mrs. Adams and daughter, Mary, Mrs. John Kirby and Mr. Baier of Somonauk. HR 12/11/1913

Kenneth Swift 1913.12.16
Mr. and Mrs. D. C. Swift of Waterman returned from Sterling Friday where they attended the funeral of their nephew, Kenneth Swift. The young man was the oldest son of Mr. and Mrs. R. K. Swift, was 24 years old, and death followed a brief illness. He was a graduate from the township high school and had been clerk at the Burlington Depot for several years. Surviving are his parents and two brothers—Daniel and Paul.
HR 12/18/1913

Alcott W. Fay 1914.01.01
Alcott W. Fay was born in Squaw Grove Township March 21, 1847 and died in Chicago January 9, 1914. Practically his entire life was spent in his native township.
In the fall of 1879 he married Miss Mary J. White. To this union three sons were born–Rollin C. Fay, Wells E. Fay and Everett L. Fay. Everett died when eight years of age. Mrs. Fay died in 1888.
In April 1891 Mr. Fay married Miss Florence B. White and to this union one child, Marjorie Josephine, was born. Mr. Fay is survived by his widow, two sisters, Mrs. E. P. Gardner and Mrs. Lorenzo J. Lamson, two sons, Rollin C. and Wells E., and one daughter Marjorie J. Fay.
Deceased was a farmer, operating as such first with his father, and later for himself on the Austin Fay farm on the west line of Squaw Grove Township. In 1906 he retired from active life and came to Hinckley, remaining here until the time of his death.
Mr. Fay held the Christian view of life, taught by the Advent
Church. His father’s church was his church. There being no Adventist church in the vicinity he fellowshipped with the Methodist Church in Hinckley, giving liberally to its support and attending regularly its public services.
He was a quiet, retiring, unobtrusive man. Justice marked all his dealings with his fellows. Righteousness was grained into the very fibre of his being, while goodness lighted the lamp of his life. Especially in his own home this latter grace ever shone to make glad the heart of sisters, wife, sons, and daughter. In the passing of Brother Fay, Hinckley loses one of its most widely known and highly respected citizens. He, too, has joined the innumerable caravan, moving on to the land of eternal never-ending day.
Mr. Fay was taken to the hospital in Chicago September 29 for treatment of infection on one of his feet which followed a slight trouble with a toe. After several days the surgeons amputated the foot, feeling that he would survive. He was to have been brought home last week, a day or so before his death, as his condition had improved to such an extent that it was thought he would recover more rapidly in his own home and among his old friends. He was at the Lamson home in Chicago at that time, where everything that wealth could provide was done for him. An abscess formed on the base of his spine, and this, coupled with his former trouble, created such a condition so suddenly that his life was taken before the change could be made.
The funeral was held from the Methodist Church Sunday afternoon and a great company of friends and relatives and old neighbors gathered to show their esteem of the departed. Pastor Diehl of the Hinckley Church had charge of the funeral and a mixed quartet consisting of Mrs. Graves and Mrs. Fry and Mr. Welton and Mr. Clark, sang with Mrs. Kennedy at the piano.
The bearers were Wallace and Andrew Gilchrist, George Burkett, George Kessner, H. J. Wilcox and M. H. Beitel. Interment was in Greenwood in the family lot.-Hinckley Review.
HR 1/15/1914

Dora Treat 1914.02.04
Dora Treat, the 14 month old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. P. S. Treat of Sandwich, died Friday morning (February 6, 1914) at 11 o’clock of pneumonia. The child was of triplets. The first one, Doris, died at the age of 3 weeks, and the last of the three is now very low with pneumonia and is not expected to live. Mr. and Mrs. Treat have two other children, William, 5 years old and Alice, 3. The funeral was held from the home, eight miles northwest of Sandwich, Saturday afternoon. Interment was in Oak Mound Cemetery.
——————
Dora, fourteen months old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Pearle Treat, died Thursday (February 5, 1914) of pneumonia. She was one of the girl triplets. Doris died at the age of three weeks and Dorothy, the last, now living, is very sick. Mr. and Mrs. Treat have one boy—William, age five and Alice, three years. The funeral was held Saturday and interment was at Oak Mound Cemetery. HR 2/12/1914

Eldo White 1914.02.08
A telegram was received here last week telling of the sudden death at Minneapolis of Mr. Eldo White. From meager information we learn that Mr. White had eaten a hearty dinner and started for the YMCA building where he was employed.. He had just reached the door when he fell forward dead. His wife will be known here as Miss Alice Harter, a sister of R. K. Harter. –Sandwich Free Press February 26, 1914.
———————
News comes to relatives in Hinckley last night that Mr. Eldo White of Minneapolis, only brother of Mrs. Alcott W. Fay, had died suddenly of heart failure Monday night (February 16, 1914). No particulars of the sad death are procurable at this time. Mrs. Fay has been in Cedar Rapids, IA, since the death of her husband a few weeks ago, and is expected home the latter part of this week. HR 2/19/1914

George M. Kuter 1914.02.12
Mr. George M. Kuter passed away at his home in Hinckley Saturday afternoon (February 28, 1914) about two o’clock. He had been ailing for many weeks with cancer of the stomach, and the post mortem examination conducted by his physicians showed that the immediate cause of death was internal hemorrhage. From Pastor Divan’s obituary we take the following:
Deceased was born in Schulkill County, PA, February 12, 1843, and was 71 years and 16 days of age at his death.
In 1852 Mr. Kuter came with his parents to Illinois, and settled in Pierce Township where he followed farming.
In 1860 at the age of seventeen, while attending a revival service under the leadership of Rev. Fisher, he yielded himself to the Lord and was blessedly saved, uniting with the Evangelical Church. He was a man of pronounced convictions, believing in experimental religion and personal acquaintance with God. He was always loyal to the church of his choice, liberally supporting its many activities and especially its missionary enterprises. A few days before his departure, he gave his pastor a check, completing his first one thousand dollars for our mission in China, and another of fifty dollars for the general treasury as a thanks offering in grateful recognition of God’s goodness toward him, and another for the Illinois conference missionary work.
March 24, 1867 he was married to Miss Amelia Buerer, which union was blessed with 13 children, five in infancy and one married daughter, Mrs. Henrietta Showalter, preceding him to the spirit world.
He leaves his widow and the following children: Mrs. Michael Krieger and Henry of Pierce; Alvin and Miss Nora of Hinckley; Mrs. Rev. William Berge of Emerson, IL; Mrs. Ida Seebach of Franklin Grove, IL, and Reuben of Sandyville IA; twenty grandchildren, one brother, Simon of Rockford and one sister, Susan Bentz of Waterloo, IA.
The funeral was held Tuesday at twelve o’clock at the house and at two o’clock in the East Pierce Church, Pastor Isaac Divan officiating, assisted by Pastor Watson of the Hinckley Baptist Church.
The bearers were Jerry Seyfert, Thomas Morris, Charles Heeg, John Schule, John Plapp and Jacob Plugfelter. The music was by a mixed quartet, consisting of Mr. and Mrs. Elmer Schumacher and Mrs. A. J. Plapp, with Mrs. Albert Schumacher at the piano. All the children and brothers and sisters and a large number of nieces and nephews, the latter mostly of Aurora, were here to attend the funeral, and there was a large gathering of friends who mourn Mr. Kuter’s departure. HR 3/5/1914

Daniel Davis 1914.02.13
One of the well known pioneers and highly respected citizens of the Big Rock vicinity, Mr. Daniel Davis, passed away at his home Sunday night (February 28, 1914). He was a veteran of the Civil War and one of the early settlers of this community. The funeral is being held today and is attended by a large number of Grand Army men and a wide circle of friends and relatives. He was the father of Mrs. Evan James. HR 3/5/1914

Nels Christian Jensen 1914.03.24
The death of Mr. Nels Christian Jensen was briefly reported last week, he having died Wednesday night (March 11, 1914) at the Schale home, just as he was getting settled on the William Coulson farm to which he was moving. He had been ill for several days, and it is thought that the changing from one place to another augmented the attack of pneumonia and caused his death.
Mr. Jensen was born in Denmark August 14, 1852 and came to America when twenty two years old. He was married in Chicago May 6, 1894, to Miss Elvene Clemensen, and five children were born to them, two of whom died in infancy. He is survived by his widow and Arnold, Harold and Marie. Two sisters also survive him—one living in Oklahoma and one in Chicago.
Seven years ago he moved from Chicago and started farming near Rochelle, and a couple of years ago he moved to the Andrew Lange farm near Hinckley, from which he was moving when taken ill. He was converted early in life and for many years was a minister in the Danish M. E. Church, and at the time of his death was a member of the Hinckley Church. He was a man of splendid presence, and although he lived here but two years, he formed a host of warm friendships and acquaintances, and his death is a severe blow to those who are left.
The funeral was held from the Methodist Church Saturday, Pastor Diehl conducting the service. Mrs. Fry and Mrs. Graves sang, with Mrs. Kennedy at the piano. The bearers were Peter Olson, C. C. Larson, August Schale, Christ Dienst, Ensign Strever and George Bushnell. HR 3/19/1914

John C. Cadwallader 1914.03.25
Mrs. Frank Menk received the sad news yesterday (March 18, 1914) that her father had passed away suddenly at Oak Park, where he was living with his son and daughter. He had been ill but ten days, although the illness developed from an old ailment of kidney trouble.
Mr. John C. Cadwallader was born in Wales about sixty seven years ago and came to this country when a young man. For ten years he was pastor of the Welsh Church at Big Rock, and he has a wide circle of fiends and acquaintances in this vicinity who well remember his many splendid qualities, and highly esteemed his Christian manhood. About two years ago he moved to Oak Park where he passed away.
He leaves a widow and three children—Mrs. Will Williams, and John Cadwallader, Jr., of Oak Park, and Mrs. Frank Menk of Hinckley. The funeral will be held from the late home tomorrow. HR 3/19/1914

Mrs. Nathan S Greenwood 1914.03.26
Mrs. Nathan S. Greenwood died at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Giles, in Oberlin, OH, March 26, 1914. She was born in New York. Her girlhood was spent in Ohio. She moved with her parents to Illinois where she was married to Nathan S. Greenwood.
After the death of her husband, Captain Nathan S. Greenwood, of Company K, 105th Illinois Volunteers, she moved to Oberlin where she has since resided. Captain Greenwood was at one time publisher of the Aurora Daily Beacon.
Though in her seventies, she was deeply interested in the problems of the day, taking an active part in home and social affairs, these activities continued until stricken with paralysis.
She is survived by two daughters—Mrs. Delia F. Giles of Oberlin and Mrs. Grace Greenwood Webb of Aurora; a grandson, Cecil Greenwood Webb and a great grandson, Herman Harry Giles. The funeral was held at Oberlin, OH, March 7. Rev. C.A. Bucks of Aurora conducted the services at the Greenwood family lot in Waterman. HR 4/2/1914

Ann McArdle Dale 1914.03.27
Mrs. Ann McArdle Dale, who passed away at her home here Friday, March 27, 1914, was one of the oldest residents of this vicinity, and came to America after her marriage. She was born in South shields, England, October 12, 1825. South Shields is in Duram County. She was the daughter of Thomas and Rachel Dixon McArdle, and on February 10, 1845, she was married to Mr. Thomas Dale at Jerron, England. Later the couple came to America.
To them were born nine children, five of whom are living—James Dale, Mrs. Mary Owens, Mrs. Jennie Owens, Stoddard Dale and Miss Ada Dale. The children who preceded their mother were John, Anna, Thomas and William
The funeral was held Monday, conducted by Rev. W. W. Diehl, and a large company of relatives and friends gathered to pay their last respects to this greatly esteemed lady. There were many from Chicago and Aurora, and the mute eestimony of the floral offerings bespoke the love and regard in which she was held by those who attended the last rites. HR 4/2/1914

W. H. Cook 1914.03.28
A local paper from Greensburg, KS, apprised friends Monday of the death of W. H. Cook, who formerly made Waterman his home. Mr. Cook was born May 9, 1829 at Shoshan, Washington County, NY, and died March 29, 1914 at the home of Mrs. Martha Palmer in Greensburg. He married Miss Sarah Foster in 1852; three years later they moved to Illinois, living near Aurora and in the vicinity of Hinckley. Six daughters were born, five of whom survive—Emma Young of Chicago, Martha Palmer of Greensburg, Anna Loveland and Nettie Dusell of Aurora, and Ida J. Scott of Elgin; twenty grandchildren and fifteen great grandchildren. HR 4/9/1914

William C. Kellum 1914.04.11
William C. Kellum, for many years a prominent resident and an attorney of Sycamore, died at his home there suddenly last Wednesday night (April 15, 1914) between eleven and twelve o’clock. Funeral services were held on Saturday afternoon. Mr. Kellum was born in Sycamore December 14, 1855, and was educated at Todd’s School in Woodstock, IL. He studied law in his father’s office, and was admitted to the bar in 1878 and at once commenced practice. Mr. Kellum leaves a wife and his son, Charles, of Detroit, MI. A brother, Sam Kellum lives at Oak Park. The deceased was the son of Hon. Charles Kellum, who was well known throughout this state.
—————-
Attorney William Kellum of Sycamore passed away suddenly at his home at the county seat Wednesday (April 15, 1914). The funeral was held Saturday and was in charge of the County Bar Association. The deceased was a splendid man and lawyer and had a wide circle of acquaintances who deeply regret his untimely death. HR 4/23/1914

Ross Ballou 1914.04.23
The remains of Ross Ballou who died from pneumonia at Billings, MT, were brought here last Thursday (April 16, 1914). Funeral services were held at the home of H. A. Ballou and interment was at the Millington-Newark Cemetery.
——————-
The Sandwich Free Press of April 16, says:–The remains of Ross Ballou reached here today at noon, from Billings, MT, where he died of pneumonia. Upon receiving notice of his death, his mother, Mrs. M. E. Ballou left her home at Kingsville, OH, for Billings to have the remains of her son prepared for shipment to Sandwich. He was sick but five days with pneumonia. Funeral services will be held this afternoon at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Hosea Ballou and the remains taken to the Millington-Newark Cemetery for burial. HR 4/23/1914

S. William Wallace 1914.04.26
Mr. S. William Wallace, father of Mrs. F. E. Graves of Hinckley, died at her home last night (April 1, 1914) at ten o’clock. Mr. Wallace is an elderly Scottish gentleman and has a host of friends here, where he spends the winters; the summers have been spent with another daughter in the Dakotas. The funeral will be held from the Graves home either Friday or Saturday afternoon and interment at Arlington Heights the following day. HR 4/2/1914
——————-
The funeral of Mr. Wallace was held from the Graves home Friday, attended by relatives and close friends.
Deacon S. William Wallace was born at Sherbrook, just over the Canada line from Vermont, February 4, 1834. When he was two years old his father moved to what is now known as Chicago Heights, IL, then being the town of Bloom. He remained there with his father until 1854, when he moved to Dunton, IL, known today as Arlington Heights. There he engaged with John Fleming in the manufacturing business. Two years later he was married to Miss Mathilda J. Fleming.
In 1885 Mr. Wallace moved to Rockford, purchasing property on Longwood Street. Here he built the family home and two large flat buildings. During his residence in Rockford, Mr. Wallace was an elder of Westminster Presbyterian Church. Since the death of Mrs. Wallace in 1908, he has made his home with his daughter, Mrs. F. E. Graves, in Hinckley, and with his daughter, Mrs. F. J. Herrick, in Mitchell, SD. He is survived by his two daughters, four grandchildren and one sister. Burial took place in the family lot at Arlington Heights. HR 4/9/1914

Josie Anna Reitz VonOhlen 1914.04.27
Mrs. Arvid VonOhlen passed away at four o’clock this morning (April 2, 1914) after a long illness which developed into bronchial pneumonia. Mrs. VonOhlen was one of our most popular women—a member of the Methodist Church and its societies and the Woman’s Club and Eastern Star. Her husband is Worshipful Master of Hinckley Masonic Lodge. No arrangements have as yet been made; a telegram was wired to supervisor William VonOhlen, who with Mrs. VonOhlen have been spending the winter in California, and not until they are heard from will the service be held. Two sons and the husband survive Mrs. VonOhlen.
The entire community expresses its sympathy for the Graves and VonOhlen families at this time. HR 4/2/1914
—————-
Sunday afternoon the funeral of Mrs. Arvid VonOhlen was held at the Methodist Church, and it was the largest funeral ever held in Hinckley. The entire auditorium capacity of the church was taken up, and the floral offerings were beautiful and profuse, a mute tribute to the high esteem in which Mrs. VonOhlen was held by all her many friends.
Miss Josie Anna Reitz was born near LaHoge, Iroquois County, IL, January 8, 1873, and died in Hinckley April 2, 1914. She lived near LaHogue until the time of her marriage, subsequent to her marriage, her life was spent in Hinckley.
January 15, 1895, she was married to Mr. Arvid VonOhlen, and to this union two children were born, both of whom are living—Floyd VonOhlen and Earl VonOhlen. Besides these two sons, she leaves her husband, her father, George Reitz, of Gilman, two brothers—August Reitz of Shady Bend, KS, and George Reitz of Gilman, to mourn her departure. Her mother passed away 14 years ago this month.
She was a frequent attendant upon the services held in the Evangelical Lutheran and Methodist Episcopal Churches. She was also a member of the Royal Neighbors, Eastern Star and the woman’s Club.
Pastor Diehl officiated at the service and the sympathy of the entire community is extended to the surviving relatives.
HR 4/9/1914

Caroline Earl Penton Bachelor 1914.04.28
Mrs. Caroline Bachelor passed away suddenly at her home in Aurora Monday (April 13, 1914), afflicted with pleuro-pneumonia, which developed in to quick tuberculosis. All of her relatives live in London, England, where she was born December 12, 1872. A daughter, Mrs. Ferdinand Baie, lives in the Waterman and Shabbona neighborhood.
Miss Caroline Earl was married twice, first to Mr. Penton, father of Mrs. Baie. She came to America about five years ago, and her illness was very brief, as she was sick but about a week.
The service in Aurora was conducted by Rev. Brandt, and in Hinckley by Rev. Hoeffer. The bearers were Will and Fred Hummel, Elihu Ramer and Ed Filbey. Burial was at Greenwood Cemetery. HR 4/16/1914

Cora Baie Temma 1914.04.29
Mrs. August Temma, formerly Miss Cora Baie, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. William Baie, died about four a.m. today (April 23, 1914) from injuries received as she was thrown from her carriage while driving home from town last evening.
Mrs. Temma had been in Hinckley on shopping errands during the afternoon, and started home about five o’clock. She was alone in the carriage. When in the west end of town, her horse became frightened and started to run. The buggy was overturned, and thrown into the ditch, and Mrs. Temma was violently hurled against a telephone pole. Neighbors in the vicinity at once saw the accident and carried her into the Fred Linn home and doctors were called.
It was found that her skull was crushed, and that there were internal injuries. Everything was done that could be done, but there was no relief and death came this morning.
It is one of the saddest accidents that has happened here for many years, and the wide circle of friends and relatives extend their sincere sympathy to the young husband who survives her, and the near family connections.
Coroner Harry G. Wright of DeKalb was summoned, and he came to Hinckley and held an inquest today. The verdict of the jury was in accordance with the facts in the case—accidental death caused by a runaway horse. HR 4/23/1914
—————-
The funeral of Mrs. August Temma, who was killed in a runaway accident last week, was held from the Squaw Grove German Lutheran Church Sunday afternoon, Pastor Kroeger officiating. Music was by the choir of the church, and interment was made in the church cemetery.
Cora Baie, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. William Baie, was born July 20, 1885. Her mother was formerly Miss Carrie Reidelsperger, and the mother died in 1894.
When Miss Baie was five years old, the family moved to Missouri, where deceased lived until about ten years ago, when she returned to this section of DeKalb County. For several years she made her home with some of the prominent families of the U. P. district, and wherever she was called to help, she made a host of friends. While not a member of any church—Mrs. Temma was a constant attendant at church services. In Missouri she was a member of the Sunday school and an attendant at the United Brethren Church; in DeKalb County she regularly attended the U. P. Church, and since her home has been in Hinckley she has been a regular attendant at the St. Paul’s Church.
Deceased leaves her father and step mother, Mr. and Mrs. William Baie, two brothers, Frank of San Simon, AZ, and Roy of Sandwich; two sisters, Mrs. Harry Troeger of Hinckley and Mrs. Mat Black of Kansas City, and two little half sisters, eight and ten years old. Two grandmothers—Mrs. Chris Baie and Mrs. Frank Reidelsperger also mourn the passing of this young life.
The bearers at the funeral were Martin and Leonard Rissman, W. A. and Will Leifheit, and Will and Ed Borchers.
HR 4/30/1914

Clara Saunders Greeley 1914.04.30
In the death of Mrs. Clara Greeley, the community loses one of its oldest and most respected residents. That small but goodly circle of early settlers, with whom she was most intimately identified, most keenly feel the loss they have sustained.
Miss Clara Saunders was born in West Gaines, NY, March 22, 1839. Here she was married in 1857 to Hiram M. Greeley, and with whom the same year she came to the new home in Clinton Township, where they lived together until Mr. Greeley’s death in 1909.
Mrs. Greeley was of a modest and retiring nature. She was concerned with wholesome simplicity and unaffected sincerity. She companied much with the homely virtues and was thoroughly and frankly genuine. Her nature ever gave optimism a good name. However ominous a situation, her subtle humor relived the strain. She had a happy way of toning all darkness with the bright colors of patience and fortitude. As a friend and neighbor, she was such as one coveted in the sorest striates of life. In sickness or need she responded with heartiest helpfulness. Her tonic sympathy and astringent good humor strengthened the heart of many.
Her life was largely woven into the Methodist Church of which she was a member since her arrival into the community fifty seven years ago. She was long the church organist, at the same time that her husband was the chorister. It was her joyful part in many ways ever to befriend her various pastors and their families.
Her Christian life took on much the same characteristics as her private life. She was quiet and of few words, choosing rather to express her testimony by a humble and gentle spirit, along with active kindliness and unassuming devotion.
One feels as if the following lines were written for her:
I know thou hast gone where thy forehead is starred
With the beauty that dwelt in they soul;
Where the light of thy loveliness cannot be marred
Nor thy heart be flung from its goal.
Among those of her nearest kin that sorrow over her departure, are a brother, Mr. Egbert B. Saunders of Fresno, CA, and her children, all living in this community—George H.; Mrs. Rose Marion of Aurora; Frank A., Carl L., and Dr. Paul E. N. Greeley.
In the large company at the funeral were many from other towns—Dr. and Mrs. G. M. Todd of Toledo, OH; Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Marion, Aurora; Oscar Tomblin, West Pullman; Lee Tomblin, Aurora; Mr. and Mrs. Neal Dean, Somonauk; Mr. and Mrs. C. O. Dean, Hinckley; Mr. and Mrs. S. M. Henderson, Sycamore; Mrs. M. O. Treeman, Batavia. HR 4/30/1914

Carrie Hall Taggart 1914.05.13
Mrs. Carrie hall Taggart died Monday, May 4, 1914, at the home of her brother, W. B. Hall, in Chicago, and the remains were brought here Wednesday for burial beside the parents, Mr. and Mrs. Delormy Hall, in Johnson Grove cemetery. Carrie hall is remembered by friends a beautiful child and young lady; she was born here 46 years ago. She has been an invalid for several years and surviving are two brothers—William R. and Charles Hall. HR 5/7/1914

Louis Leifheit 1914.05.14
Louis Leifheit, son of Mrs. Chris Leifheit, with whom he has lived all his life, and whose companion he has been since the death of the husband and father three or four years ago, passed away at his home in Hinckley about 12:30 Monday morning (May 4, 1914). His heart had been weakened by alcohol and death followed a series of spasms. Everything was done that could be done to secure quiet and rest for him, but there was little hope.
“Louie” Leifheit was one of the biggest hearted boys ever raised in this community. Up to a year or so ago he was of a bright and cheerful disposition, always ready to stop his work long enough for a joke and a laugh. He was popular in every household and business house about town as he distributed the ice, or delivered freight and express packages, or any of the other jobs that come to a drayman. He was a natural born wit and humorist, and has entertained audiences many times here with humorous sketches and skits, and his work was that of a professional. He will be missed by everybody in town and all regret his passing away.
Louie was christened and confirmed at the Squaw Grove Lutheran Church northwest of Hinckley, and pastor Kroeger will have charge of the funeral which is being held from the home this Thursday afternoon. Burial will be in the Squaw Grove Cemetery.
Besides his aged mother, he leaves a sister who lives with her family on the farm in Nebraska. HR 5/7/1914

Frona Ziegler Bloom 1914.05.15
Many friends were saddened Tuesday evening (May 2, 1914) when they received the news that Mrs. Ed Bloom had passed away at the pretty home in Hinckley. While the end was not unexpected, still the climax of a long fight for life is always distressing when death finally conquers.
For nearly two years Mrs. Bloom has been afflicted, but the past six months has seen a steady decline. She has suffered patiently, knowing there was but little hope, and death was a merciful visitor.
Frona Ziegler, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Louis Ziegler, was born in Pierce February 20, 1868, and was married to Edward Bloom February 26, 1893. They made their home in Hinckley at once, where Mr. Bloom was employed by Albert Molitor. In later years Mr. Bloom bought the blacksmith business, and built the fine home on Lincoln Avenue. One child was born to them, Miss Merle Bloom, who with her father, will grieve the mother’s departure.
The funeral will be held at the home at 1 o’clock Friday afternoon, and from there the services will continue at St. Paul’s Church. Rev. Mr. Bauman of Aurora will have charge of the services. The four brothers—Albert, Fred, Henry and Louis Ziegler, will act as bearers, and Miss Stella Wedkemper and Mrs. Will F. Leifheit will sing, accompanied by Miss Hattie Biehl. HR 5/7/1914
————————-
The funeral of Mrs. Ed Bloom was held at one o’clock Friday afternoon at the home on Lincoln Avenue, and from there the service was continued at St. Paul’s Church under the charge of Rev. Mr. Bauman of Aurora. There were many friends and relatives to pay the last sad rites to the memory of Mrs. Bloom. She had suffered long and patiently, and everybody was grieved to hear of her death.
Among those from a distance who attended the funeral were her folks, the Ziegler family, from Pierce Township; Mrs. Frank Ramer of DeKalb; Mrs. Eugene Grimm of Clear Lake, IA; Louis Ziegler of Maple Park; Amel Ahlen of Maple Park; Henry Ziegler of Sandwich. HR 5/14/1914

Henry Edward Ramer 1914.05.16
Henry E. Ramer, a veteran of the Civil War and a relative of the Ramer families of Hinckley, passed away at his home in DeKalb Friday evening (May 1, 19114) after a long illness. For several weeks there has been no hope of his recovery. The relatives from here were in attendance at the funeral Sunday afternoon from the DeKalb Methodist Church,of which he was a member. The services were in charge of the Grand Army of the Republic, of which he was also a member.
Henry Edward Ramer was born in Richland County, OH, March 13, 1840, and was one of the pioneer settlers of this community, coming here with his parents in 1815. Mr. Ramer received his early education here and later engaged in farming, and prospered, later retiring to DeKalb.
In April 1861, Mr. Ramer joined the army as a member of Company F, 13th Illinois Volunteer Infantry. He served over three years and was then honorably discharged.
Following his return from the war, he was married in Sycamore November 1, 1865, to Miss Mary Jane Filmer. They were the parents of seven children: Hiram S. R., Mrs. Isabelle May Schule, Arthur E., Alonzo L., Mrs. Nellie Ziegler, Mrs. Minnie J. Yocum, and Frank E. HR 5/7/1914

Ruth Isabelle Frost 1914.05.17
Mrs. Ruth Isabelle Frost died Monday, May 10, 1914, at the home of her son, Otto Frost, on the Ed Griffin farm. She has been in poor health for many years, but during the past six months her lungs and heart have been exceptionally weak. She was 53 years old. The remains were taken to Mt. Vernon for burial. Surviving are four children—two boys, Otto Frost and Robert Brakey, and two daughters—all with families who live in the vicinity of Waterman and Shabbona. HR 5/14/1914

Joel Wagner 1914.05.18
Early Sunday morning (May 17, 1914) the word was passed quietly in this vicinity that Joel Wagner of Big Rock had passed away at 5 minutes after 1 o’clock. While his death had been anticipated for many weeks and was no surprise to his friends, still there was the shock of the news—the fact that no more would be seen about his daily business—no more among his friends—that always accompanies such information.
Joel Wagner was born in Fort Plains, Montgomery County, NY, November 11, 1834, and when he was sixteen years of age came to Kane County, and settled on a farm near Big Rock, and lived there until the Civil War broke out. He was one of the first to answer Lincoln’s call, and he enlisted in that grand old regiment, the 36th Illinois, and fought with them for his country and his flag until he was wounded in the terrible engagements at Stone River. He was taken to the northern hospital in Nashville, and after recovering he was honorably discharged and returned to the north. Up to his dying moment his patriotism and love of country were the foundation of his character. Throughout life he suffered from the effects of his wounds, but no pain or anguish incurred by them could break that indomitable spirit of patriotism.
In 1895 he retired from the farm and moved to his splendid home in Big Rock, where he passed away.
Mr. Wagner was married in 1865 to Miss Anna Layson and of this union two sons and one daughter were born—Willard. S., Arthur H., and Anna. The daughter died in infancy; Arthur died at the age of 26 years, and the mother passed away in January 1879, so that Willard S. Wagner is the only surviving member of that family Mr. Wagner married again in November 1880, to Miss Elizabeth Deidrich, and she with her two sons, Frank L. Wagner and Clarence F. Wagner, remain to mourn the loss of a loving father and husband.
Besides those of his immediate family circle who survive are H. D. Wagner, a brother, of Hinckley; Mrs. Archie Miller of Hinckley; Mrs. Kate Hall of Springfield, IL, and Mrs. Lydia Jackson of Los Angeles, CA. The funeral was held from the late home Tuesday afternoon and there was a great assemblage of friends. The G.A.R. Post of Aurora, of which Mr. Wagner was a member, exemplified their beautiful ritual at the home. The congregational pastor of Aurora delivered the invocation, and Rev. W. W. Diehl assisted in the service at the home and at the grave.
The bearers were—D. W. Lewis, D. J. Morris, George Davis, John Evans, Will Price and Fred Hamilton. HR 5/21/1914

Elizabeth Such Bradbury 1914.05.19
The funeral of Mrs. A. A. Bradbury was held Tuesday afternoon at the Presbyterian Church. Rev. W. M. White delivered the sermon. Mrs. White sang two solos and Miss Marion Nelson was accompanist. W. J. Randle, W. G. Potter, August Leifheit, George Hall William Richmond and W. T. Nelson were bearers and interment was in Clinton Cemetery.
Miss Elizabeth Such was born October 16, 1823 in London, England, and died May 23, 1914 from the infirmities of old age. When 14 years old, she was confirmed in the Church of England and remained an Episcopalian during her life. July 15, 1847, she was united in marriage to Alfred A. Bradbury, who preceded her in death twelve years go. To them were born seven children. The four surviving are Mrs. A. A. Stryker, Mrs. G. W. Bradbury of Waterman, Charles of Rochelle, and Harry of Oregon.
Mr. and Mrs. Bradbury landed in Chicago 59 years ago but so unpromising was the much talked about city, they immediately went to Arcola, IL. Forty two years ago they moved to Waterman where Mr. Bradbury conducted a grocery and served many years as postmaster.
Mrs. Bradbury, as a rule, enjoyed good health, was vigorous in body and mind, loved nature and saw America advance in all modern improvements.
Six grandchildren also survive and the relatives attending the funeral from away were: Mr. and Mrs. Charles Bradbury, Mr. and Mrs. Frank Bradbury of Rochelle, Mr. and Mrs. Harry Bradbury, Mr. and Mrs. Guy Bradbury of Oregon, Mr. and Mrs. B. B. Bradbury of Arcola, and Shirley Bradbury of Seneca.
HR 5/28/1914, 6/4/1914

August Leifheit 1914.05.20
Quite a number of relatives went from Hinckley and Waterman Saturday, to attend the funeral of August Leifheit, who died at his home south of Yorkville on the preceding Thursday (May 28, 1914).
Mr. Leifheit was one of the pioneers of Kendall County. He came west in an early day, and is the last of the brothers who founded the numerous Leifheit family which has been such a strong factor in the development of Kendall and DeKalb Counties. Mr. Leifheit was ninety years and one month of age when he died, and is succeeded by a wide circle of relatives.
Among those from this part of the state who attended the funeral Saturday were: Mr. and Mrs. Dolph Leifheit, Mr. and Mrs. H. H. Leifheit, Mr. and Mrs. Ernest Greinert, Mr. and Mrs. Louis Greinert, Ernest Leifheit, Charles Leifheit, William Leifheit, Mr. and Mrs. Will Hotopp, Fred Wedemeier, Mr. and Mrs. Herman VonOhlen of Hinckley; August Leifheit of Waterman. HR 6/4/1914

Adelbert W. Fuller 1914.06.10
Adelbert W. Fuller, 67 years old, died Monday night (June 29, 1914) shortly before 6 o’clock at his home, 275 South Lake Street, Aurora, after a lingering illness. Mr. Fuller who was a retired farmer, moved to Aurora from Waterman about a year ago. He was born in New York State, September 21, 1846, and came to Illinois about 60 years ago. He served in the Army of the United States during the Civil War and was a member of Post 20 GAR in Aurora.
The deceased is survived by his wife, Mrs. Susie B. Fuller, two brothers, Harvey L. Fuller of Waterman, E. A. Fuller of West Pullman; one sister, Mrs. W. Wiltberger of Waterman; three children, Charles M. Fuller of Waterman, Mrs. H. N. Guillet of Cortez, CO, John N. Fuller of Sandwich, and 13 grandchildren.
Short services will be held Friday morning at 8:15 o’clock at his home, after which the remains will be sent to Waterman. The funeral will be held from the home of his son, Charles M. Fuller in Waterman. Interment will be at Waterman. The Aurora services will be in charge of Post 20 GAR.
——————-
Adelbert Udney Fuller was born in Carlton, Orleans County, NY, September 21, 1846.
He was the youngest of five children of Obadiah Norman Fuller and Mary Sophronia Fuller. The family moved to Aurora in 1851, when he was five years old. The father died in Aurora and the family came to Clinton, now Waterman, after living in Aurora four years.
He served in the northern army during the Civil war, joining the 9th Illinois Cavalry, and was mustered out in 1865. He belonged to the Thomas Terry Post.
September 26, 1867 he married Susan Heal Curry of Squaw Grove. For many years their home was on a farm two miles northwest of Waterman. Four children were in the family—Frank who died at the age of one year, and eight months; Charles, who has always lived on the home farm; Lida, who married Herman Guillet of Cortez, CO, and John, a farmer southeast of Waterman. There are thirteen grandchildren. In 1875 he joined the Methodist Church.
Eighteen years ago Mr. Fuller and his wife moved to Waterman from the farm, where they lived until last October when they moved to Aurora After an illness of more than a year and a half, he passed quietly away Tuesday morning, June 30, 1914. Besides his wife and children he leaves two brothers—H. L. Fuller of Waterman, E. A. Fuller of West Pullman, and one sister, Mrs. William Wiltberger of Waterman. The oldest sister, Mrs. Charles Mighell, died five years ago.
A great lover of children, he was dearly loved by the grandchildren and nieces and nephews. There are many relatives and a host of friends who will cherish his memory.
HR 7/23/1914
Samuel Lintner 1914.06.11
“Do you mean it Sam?” asked Jacob Miller of Samuel Lintner, back in the early 60’s, as the two boys shook hands together on the old well platform, when Mr. Lintner had said he would go to war if Jake would. Thus was the compact formed which took the two boys off to the front. They enlisted in the 113th Illinois Volunteers, known as the “Board of Trade Regiment,” and they lacked but two months of seeing three years of service.
Mr. Lintner died at the Aurora Hospital Saturday (June 6, 1914), and his body was brought to Hinckley Monday night, and the funeral held Tuesday afternoon.
Samuel Lintner was born at Sinica, Crawford County, OH, seventy two years ago. When just a mere lad he came to DesPlaines with his parents. They resided there but a short time, then settled in Pierce Township, DeKalb County and when in his early teens he enlisted in the army with his boyhood friend Jacob Miller, serving until the war was over.
Returning from the war, Mr. Lintner was married December 31, 1868 to Miss Eliza Kuter, who preceded him in death about thirty years ago. By this union he leaves two children—Mrs. Jennie Jacobson of Kalamazoo, MI, and Mrs. Florence Nelson of Charles City, IA.
October 18, 1888, he was again married, his bride being Miss Anna J. Worthey of Houghton, MI. Three children survive with the widow—Marie and Milton Lintner, 15 and 14 years old respectively, and Miss Ada Lintner, a school teacher in Iowa.
Rev. W. W. Diehl conducted the service at the house Tuesday, and Pastor Divan at the East Pierce Church with interment in the East Pierce Cemetery. The music was by the church quartet, and the bearers were six nephews—Alvin Kuter, Jacob Haish, the Kuntz brothers, Cyrus Schumacher and Henry Kuter. HR 6/11/1914

Belle Winslow 1914.06.12
News was received in Hinckley of the death of Miss Belle Winslow at her home in Westgate, CA.
For several weeks Miss Winslow had been afflicted with paralysis, having the first stroke about four weeks ago. Her condition gradually grew worse until the end came last week.
The funeral and interment was held at Westgate Saturday afternoon, and none of the friends and relatives from here were able to attend.
Miss Winslow lived for many years in the old Winslow home near Lincoln Avenue, and when she decided to move to California about four years ago, the property was sold to the late George Herrington. She is from one of the oldest families of this vicinity, and her passing away removes another one of the descendants of those who were the early pioneers in the mercantile, professional and agricultural life of the county.
HR 6/11/1914

John George Linn 1914.06.13
Johnny Linn passed away at the home of his brother, Fred Linn, Monday night (June 15, 1914) about 10:20 o’clock, after a few months illness from tuberculosis. He was popular about town and had a host of friends, all of whom regret the passing away of this industrious young man.
John George Linn, son of Conrad and Carrie Linn, was born in Pierce Township March 15, 1887, and moved to Hinckley when about three years of age. After attending school here he worked for the Burlington in several capacities—as a helper at the depot, as a section hand and as flagman at the Sycamore Street crossing. He was ever an accommodating and gentlemanly young fellow, well liked by everybody in town, honest, upright and industrious, and his host of friends regret his demise so early in life.
Johnny’s father died four years ago, and those surviving him are his mother, a brother, Fred Linn, and a sister, Mrs. John Powers.
The funeral is being held at the home this afternoon (Thursday) at 1 o’clock, and later at St. Paul’s Church, the services being conducted by Rev. R. Merrnitz, pastor of St. Paul’s. Interment will be in the Miller Cemetery.
HR 6/18/1914

Henry Greeley 1914.07.04
Mrs. Henry Greeley
E. Wayne Richardson
Mrs. Wayne Richardson
While there is a tendency toward a sane celebration of America’s greatest holiday and a gradual getting away from the implements of death that for years have been used in connection with the nation’s birthday, yet each year has its toll paid in the death of many people. Last Saturday was no exception to the rule, though the automobile seems to have supplanted the big firecracker and the dynamite, as death dealing weapons. The metropolitan papers Saturday and Sunday contained many accounts of people who had met their death when autos had turned turtle or when crashed into by trains at crossings.
Without a doubt the most terrible and distressing accident where a train crashed into an automobile in DeKalb County was that last Saturday night about half past six when a Ford machine driven by Dr. Henry Greeley, and accompanied by his wife and her sister and husband, E. Wayne Richardson and wife, drove onto a crossing about a mile and a half Southwest of Shabbona on the Paw Paw branch of the CB&Q Railroad running from Streator to Shabbona. The crossings is more familiarly known in that section as the Burke farm crossing.
The home of the Richardsons was in Chicago where he was Secretary until last spring, of the American Employment Association at 68 West Washington Street. A few months ago he opened an office of his own at 219 South Dearborn Street. He was financial secretary of the Western Avenue Methodist Episcopal Church, and, member of the Epworth League. Mrs. Richardson was an active member of the church. They were married two years ago. Mr. Richardson was 25 years old and his wife 24. Mrs. Richardson had gone to the home of her sister for a few days visit, and for the fourth was joined by her husband. In the afternoon Dr. Greeley who had gone to Lee only a few months ago to practice medicine, accompanied by his wife and Mr. and Mrs. Richardson went out for a pleasure ride and visited with a cousin of the former, Dr. Greeley of Waterman. Late in the afternoon they started on the return trip to Lee, going by way of Shabbona.
The approach to the crossing from both ways is exceedingly limited, especially so in approaching from the East. Whether he did not hear or see the train, or in trying to get across, killed his engine, will never be known. George Schrader and family were coming from the west and had just crossed the tracks and passed Dr. Greeley on the hill east of the crossing when they heard the crash of the freight train into the auto. Stopping his machine he went back to render any possible assistance and found the bodies
Lawrence Schrader, who was with his father, and whom the writer met at the scene of the accident Sunday morning, said the train was known as the Streator way freight, that it was a short one of only five or six cars and was running 20 to 25 miles an hour. From the location of the wrecked car, the unfortunate people had almost cleared the track when the crash came, the auto being struck about at the rear wheels.
The crossing is an especially dangerous one. The construction of the road necessitated a cut of about eight or ten feet and to meet this cut, the highway has been lowered about half that many feet. On South side of the highway weeds and grasses have been allowed to grow and these with a row of trees obstruct the view from the south In fact on both sides of the highway, the view is more or less obstructed.
The train was stopped as quickly as possible, but before the trainmen and Mr. Schrader could get to the crossing, Dr. Greeley and his wife and Mrs. Richardson were dead. Mr. Richardson was thrown on an embankment. The bodies of the dead and Mr. Richardson were placed in the waycar and taken to Shabbona. The limited train was stopped and Mr. Richardson rushed to Dr. Greeley’s hospital in Waterman where he died about 11 o’clock.
The bodies of Dr. Greeley and his wife and Mrs. Richardson were badly mangled, hardly a bone being left unbroken.
The bodies in Dr. Greeley and wife and Mrs. Richardson were taken to Dr. Greeley’s hospital at Waterman and on Monday the four coffins were taken to Chicago where the funeral services were held Wednesday at the Western Avenue Methodist Episcopal Church.
Dr. Greeley graduated from the Chicago college of Medicine about a year ago and went to Lee to practice six months ago. He was married to Mrs. Dammerell a year ago last Friday.
The automobile was a shapeless mass of iron and was picked up and placed on hand car and taken to Shabbona where it was locked in a car by the railroad company.
So terrific was force of the blow that the fence at the cattle guard was broken into kindling wood and a large cedar post was pulled up bodily out of the ground. A heavy cast-iron guard was picked up and thrown several feet and fell upon the body of Mrs. Greeley. Mr. Richardson was thrown upon an embankment and the automobile was beyond the body of Mrs. Greeley.
——————-
While enjoying an automobile ride Saturday evening (July 4, 1914), a slow moving Burlington freight train on the Paw Paw branch, struck the automobile driven by Dr. Henry Greeley of Lee and instantly killed the doctor and Mrs. Greeley and Mrs. E. W. Richardson of Chicago, and injured Mr. Richardson fatally. He died at the East side Hospital in Waterman about six hours later.
The accident is the most terrible that has happened in DeKalb County in many years.
Mr. and Mrs. Richardson came out from Chicago to spend the Fourth with Dr. and Mrs. Greeley, the ladies being sisters. The four young people had planned several little auto parties and picnic parties for the holiday, and were enjoying their ride and talking over old times when they approached the grade crossing about a mile and a half from Shabbona. The railroad crosses the highway at the bottom of a deep cut, the sides of which, along the railroad track, are lined with trees and hedge. In the enjoyment of the hour it is presumed the doctor drove onto the track without taking the precautions he would have taken had he been driving alone or the pleasure of the ride less keen. He did not have time to swerve his machine nor did his guests have time to jump. The huge iron monster was on top or the auto and crushed out the lives of three of its occupants and fatally injured the fourth.
The result was not like an accident with a fast train. The engine seemed to crush and mangle instead of throwing violently to the sides.
The bodies were picked up by autoists and taken to Shabbona, where they were cared for in the undertaking rooms, and Mr. Richardson was rushed to the East Side Hospital at Waterman, which is owned by Dr. P. E. N. Greeley, a cousin of the Lee doctor who was killed. Waterman was shocked by the news. The Greeley family is one of the most prominent and numerous families in the vicinity and the home of the Greeleys has been in Clinton and Shabbona Townships for many generations The deceased and his wife were widely known, and the tragic ending of the pleasure ride is a sad blow which the community will feel for many years. He was a rising young physician and surgeon at Lee. The four young people have been connected by marriage and both marriages were performed by the uncle of Mr. Richardson.
Mr. E. Wayne Richardson was a Chicago business man, and after he was taken to the hospital he never fully regained consciousness. He was in a comatose condition just a short time and those at his bedside managed to hear him utter his street address and telephone number, and that was all he said before his passing away at midnight.
Monday afternoon a memorial service for Dr. and Mrs. Greeley was held in the Methodist Church at Waterman, Rev. Rapp of Lee conducting the service. Mrs. Bryce Ferguson sang two solos, accompanied by Miss Mertys Garner. The bodies of the four young people were shipped to Chicago Monday evening, and Tuesday services were held in the city, and interment made in Forest Home Cemetery.
The coroner’s jury fixed no blame for the accident, simply returning a verdict of death by train No. 94 of the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad Company.
Among those who attended the service at Waterman were Mr. and Mrs. Robert Mullins, Mrs. Sophia Smith, Mrs. Kittleson, Mrs. Robert Nau, Mrs. Frank Childs, Mr. and Mrs. Warberg, Mr. and Mrs. Cofield of Lee, Mr. and Mrs. Lang and Mr. and Mrs. John Simmons of Malta, Dr. Harry Greeley of Duluth, MN, and Liston Greeley of Chicago, brothers of Dr. Henry Greeley, Dr. and Mrs. Marion of Big Rock, and Mr. Henry Greeley of Chicago, uncle of deceased. HR 7/9/1914

Nels Peterson 1914.07.09
Nels Peterson, aged about 60 years, was instantly killed by lightning just before 11:00 Tuesday (July 16, 1914) forenoon at his home on the Wirick farm north of town, later known as the Gardner W. Thompson place.
Mr. Peterson with his two sons and hired man were in the field at work when a severe storm of rain, thunder and lightning came up suddenly. They hurried to the barn and had tied up the horses and Mr. Peterson was standing in the barn door. Lightning struck the iron track above the door, tearing it loose and the bolt then entered Peterson’s body causing death in an instant. The youngest son was knocked down but recovered at once. The hired man was rendered unconscious and for a time it was feared that he was fatally hurt, but he later regained consciousness and was able to talk and move about.
——————-
Mr. and Mrs. Kit Carson attended the funeral of Nels Peterson at Rollo Sunday. Mr. Peterson was instantly killed by lightning Thursday (July 16, 1914) while standing in the barn door. He was 60 years old. Surviving is a wife, three sons and two daughters. He was a brother-in-law of John Larson and often visited in Waterman before the Larsons moved to Adair, OK.
HR 7/23/1914

Mr. Horneman 1914.07.13
Monday evening Mr. William Leifheit of Hinckley and Mr. August Leifheit of Waterman left for Des Moines, IA, to attend the funeral of Mr. Horneman, brother-in-law of Mr. Leifheit of Hinckley.
Details of the death of Mr. Horneman are meager at this time. It is learned that for many months he had been suffering with a severe attack of asthma, and with his relatives, was on his way to a sanitarium on his doctor’s advice.
He was taken violently ill, and in a few moments he passed away before a town could be reached.
The funeral was held Tuesday at Des Moines, and relatives and friends here extend their sympathy to the family in this bereavement. HR 7/30/1914

Lewis Bastian 1914.07.14
While in the yard with his cattle Thursday, July 21, Lewis Bastian was stricken with paralysis. He did not lose consciousness, and was quickly assisted to the home and physicians called. The stroke appeared a slight one, and in a day or so he was once more about the place with the assistance of his people.
However, it is believed that the first of this week another stroke must have been sustained, for he grew worse, and passed away early Monday morning, July 27, 1914.
Mr. Bastian comes from the well known Bastian family of this county. He was the son of the late Mr. and Mrs. August Bastian, and was born on the home farm in Squaw Grove Township, August 17, 1856. He was married April 7, 1881, to Miss Minnie Stahl, and a year or so after their wedding they moved to a farm, a mile and a half south of Kaneville.
Ten children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Bastian, seven of whom are living—Mrs. Lottie Baie, Frank, Ray, Elmer, Everett, Harold and Stanley Bastian. Besides his wife and children he is survived by four brothers and three sisters—Peter Bastian, Mrs. Mary Leifheit, Gus Bastian, Mrs. Bertha Hohm, Frank Bastian, Mrs. Anna Stahl and Charles Bastian.
The funeral was held from St. Paul’s Church in Hinckley yesterday afternoon, conducted by Pastor Mernitz. The music was by the church choir, and the bearers were Fred Humiston, John Florence, Jonathan Garbleman, Christ Dienst, John and Henry Morsch. Burial was in Oak Mound Cemetery in the U. P. District. HR 7/30/1914
———————-
Lewis Bastian a Woodman
Mr. A. F. Prince, clerk of the Hinckley Woodmen Camp, has received official notice from Director S. S. Tanner of that greatest of all fraternal assistance societies, the Modern Woodmen of America, regarding the certificate carried by the late neighbor, Lewis Bastian. Mr. Bastian carried a $3,000 policy in the order, and had been a member 19 years, 10 months and 28 days, paying his monthly assessments regularly, amounting to a total of $414.20. At the time of his death Mr. Bastian was 57 years, 11 months and 10 days of age. The claim for his insurance has been allowed in full and the check for three thousand dollars, in a couple of days, will be placed with the widow and family. HR 8/20/1914

S. E. Shimp 1914.08.13
Word came to Mrs. R. D. Chappell last night that her grandfather, S. E. Shimp of Naperville had passed away suddenly late Tuesday night (August 4, 1914). Mr. Shimp was formerly sheriff of DuPage County and a noted auctioneer in this section of Illinois. He often visited in Hinckley when the Stark families lived here, as he was the father of Mrs. H. W. Stark, now of Minneapolis, who will be here for the funeral which will be held at Naperville tomorrow. Besides his daughter, Mrs. Stark, Mr. Shimp leaves several other children and his wife. He was well up in the eighties and has been ailing for a couple of years, but this summer he seemed to be much better. About four years ago Mr. and Mrs. Shimp celebrated their golden wedding anniversary. HR 8/6/1914

William Freise 1914.08.14
Hinckley folks have received the sad news that William Freise of Yorkville, one of the pioneer retired farmers of that vicinity passed away at his home Monday (August 3, 1914). The funeral was held Wednesday. Mr. Freise was well known among the German residents of Hinckley, and was a close friend of the writer, and all regret exceedingly his passing away. Just a few years ago, he and his good wife moved into town, arranged a pleasant little home and were comfortably established to take life easy for the rest of their days. His passing away leaves a void in a wide circle of friends and relatives, and a good man has passed to the great beyond. HR 8/6/1914

George Jackson 1914.08.15
U. V. Welton and Arvid VonOhlen attended the funeral Tuesday (August 11, 1914) of Bro. George Jackson at Shabbona. Mr. Jackson was one of the members of the Shabbona Masonic Lodge, and was well known throughout the county. He has been ill for a long time, and while his passing has been anticipated for some time, still his host of friends and relatives extend their sincere sympathy and acknowledge the shock that was caused by the news of his death. He was one of Shabbona’s staunch business men for years. HR 8/13/1914

William R. Williams 1914.08.16
William R. Williams, aged 42 years, died Sunday afternoon (August 16, 1914) at the home of his father, Robert T. Williams, at Big Rock as a result of an injury received two years ago when he was working as an electrical engineer at Oak Park. He came out to make his home with his parents last January, after being unable to work since the accident.
Mr. Williams was born in North Wales, December 15, 1871, and is survived by his parents, his wife and a little daughter seven years old; two brothers—Roderick of Chicago, and Robert of Alta, Canada; two sisters—Mrs. Elizabeth Stahler of Hinckley and Mrs. Ellen J. Benjamin of Big Rock.
The funeral was held from his father’s home and from the Big Rock Baptist Church yesterday afternoon, and many relatives and friends from here were in attendance. Interment was made in the Welsh Cemetery south of Big Rock.
HR 8/20/1914

Thomas Cuddeback 1914.08.17
Relatives were apprised Thursday (August 20, 1914) of the death of Thomas Cuddeback at Springfield, KS, at 69 years of age. Surviving are his wife and one son. He was a brother-in-law of the four Stryker brothers of Waterman. Charles and Orvis Stryker left immediately to attend the funeral and will remain with their sister for a short visit. HR 8/27/1914

Henry Charles Hoepner 1914.09.05
Henry Charles Hoepner was born on January 9, 1849 at Vausen, Brunswick, Germany. He came to this country with his parents September 10, 1853. They lived near Plano, Kendall County, IL, for two years. They then moved on a farm near Sandwich where he resided with his parents until his marriage to Margaret E. Davies on December 25, 1875.
He moved with his wife to their present home February 28, 1876 where they resided until his death on Friday September 11, 1914 making a continued residence on this farm of 39 years.
To this union two children were born, one son and a daughter, Wilbertil, of Aurora, and Mrs. Louis Klotz of this place.
He leaves to mourn his death besides his two children his faithful and beloved wife, two grandchildren, three brothers, Lewis and George of Chicago, and Albert of this place, one sister, Mrs. Charles Tiede of Hinckley, and a host of other relatives and friends.
Three brothers, one sister and both parents preceded him to the great beyond.
Funeral service was held at his late home Sunday afternoon conducted by Dr. J. M. Lewis, Somonauk Lodge, AF & AM having charge Burial at Oak Ridge Cemetery.
Those from out of town to attend the funeral services were Mrs. Oscar Tripp of Colo, IA, Mrs. Carl A Dammon, Mr. and Mrs. George Alexander, Ed Frick and Louis Gurkie of State Center, IA, Mr. and Mrs. George Hoepner, Mr. and Mrs. Edwin Rooks, Mr. and Mrs. Elmer Peterson, Mr. and Mrs. Clarence Pagham, Edward Rooks and Mrs. J. H. French, of Chicago.
———————-
Many friends in Hinckley received with sorrow the news of the death of Mr. Henry Charles Hoepner of the Sandwich neighborhood last Friday (September 11, 1914). He was a brother of Mrs. Charles Tiede of Hinckley, and has been suffering for a long time with cancer of the throat and stomach. All regret the passing away of this noble life, but feel that Death, in this instance, was surely an angel of deliverance.
Mr. Hoepner was a member of the Somonauk Masonic Lodge and his fraters had charge of the impressive funeral ceremony. The floral offerings attributed to the high esteem in which he was held by his friends. Rev. Mr. Lewis of Sandwich delivered the sermon.
Many friends and acquaintances from this vicinity accompanied the relatives to the funeral Sunday. Among those from a distance were Mr. and Mrs. Alexander, Mr. Friecke, Mr. Gherke and Mrs. Damon, cousins, of State Center, IA; George Hoepner, a brother, of Chicago.
Deceased is survived by three brothers—Louis and George of Chicago, Bert, who is on the old homestead; and Mrs. Tiede of Hinckley. HR 9/17/1914

Christina Margaretta Lembach Frank 1914.09.09
Mrs. Christina Frank died at her home in Plano on Saturday evening, September 26, 1914, at six o’clock, following an illness extending over a period of several years, at the advanced age of 80 years. Her husband preceded her in death about seven years ago. She leaves to mourn her death, four sons and two daughters, Edward of California, Arnold of Aurora, Charles of Plano, Oscar of Somonauk, Mrs. J. P. Evans of Hinckley, and Mrs. Sylvia Scott, all of whom, excepting Edward, were present at the funeral, which was held at Plano Tuesday afternoon. Interment was in the cemetery at that place.
——————–
Mrs. Christina Margaretta Lembach Frank was born at Arborn, Amt Herboro, Germany, December 7, 1833, and passed to her final rest at the home of her son Charles at Plano, IL, Saturday evening, September 26, 1914.
At the age of twenty one years, she left her native country to make her home in America. Arriving in New York City August 8, 1854, she made her home with friends until September 19, 1858, when she was united in marriage to Henry August Frank.
To this union were born eight children, six of whom survive—Arnold L. of Aurora, Mrs. J. P. Evans of Hinckley, Mrs. J. E. Scott of Chicago, Charles R. of Plano, Oscar of Somonauk, and Edwin of Fresno, CA, all being present at the funeral except Edwin. She also left fifteen grandchildren and three great grandchildren.
Mr. and Mrs. H. A. Frank spent their early wedded life in and near Somonauk, moving from that place to Plano some fifteen years ago. August 5, 1906, this union was broken by the death of Mr. Frank, since which time deceased made her home with her children.
As a member of the German Lutheran Church at Somonauk, she was a constant and faithful attendant during her life at that place and many of her warm friends were in attendance at the funeral which was held Tuesday from the home of her son, C. R. Frank, Rev. Fisher in charge. Interment was in the Plano Cemetery. HR 10/15/1914

Kirk W. Stone 1914.09.10
The message Thursday night to Mr. and Mrs. J. M. Smiley, announcing the death of their brother, Kirk W. Stone, proved a great shock. Mr. Stone had been in bed for a week, to rest a bruised knee that a drain tube might operate. The afternoon of his death he was thought to be recovering nicely; he was up and dressed, ate a good supper, and no one realized the end so near until he fell from his chair and expired.
Kirk W. Stone was born September 8, 1881, at Maryville, MO, and died September 10, 1914, in Aurora. February 27, 1904, he was married to Miss Pearl Rowley, who survives. Mr. and Mrs. Stone lived in Waterman until five years ago, when they moved to Aurora. It is barely possible the knee was injured while working at his trade, laying floors.
His immediate family is almost extinct; an aged mother, Mrs. Frances H Stone, and one sister, Mrs. Ida Smiley of Waterman, are all that are left. He was a member of the Waubonsee I. O. O. F. Lodge and Carpenters’ Union at Aurora; the Modern Woodman and Mystic Workers of Waterman.
The funeral was held Sunday afternoon at Healy’s Chapel, Rev. James O’May officiating and interment was at Riverside Mausoleum. The four Hipple Brothers, W. T. Wiltberger and H. S. Rowley carried the bereaved families and relatives across the country in their touring cars to attend the service. The pall bearers were from the odd Fellows Lodge and the Carpenters’ Union.
Mrs. Stone has packed her household effects and moved to Waterman and for the present will make her home with her parents. HR 9/17/1914

Cornelia A. McGeoch McEachron 1914.09.11
Mrs. George McEachron, a victim for eighteen months with a cancerous tumor, died September 8, 1914 at her Waterman home. About one year ago she was taken to an Aurora hospital for an operation; surgeons agreed, after making an incision, no permanent help would be gained by proceeding with the work, and during the last five weeks she has been helpless.
Cornelia A. McGeoch was born in Washington County, NY, and had she lived until November, she would have been 63 years old. December 21, 1898, she was married to George L. McEachron, who died suddenly of heart failure four years ago. By adoption there is one son, Thomas Reid McEachron, who is now 13 years old. He will make his home at his aunt’s, Mrs. James Graham. Mrs. McEachron was a patient sufferer, even hopeful almost to the last. Her sister, Mrs. Jeanette McKinney, cared for her untiringly. She is survived by many relatives in the east and in this vicinity. Mrs. William Deacon, formerly of Waterman, who died in 1881, was a sister of the deceased.
HR 9/17/1914

Albert Hagen 1914.09.12
Albert Hagen, the 18 year old son of Mr. and Mrs. Albert Hagen of Aurora, died in a Chicago hospital the latter part of the week, where he had been taken for treatment. The young fellow was a popular student at the east High School and a member of last year’s football squad. His father was formerly in Hinckley, selling out a couple of years ago to A. J. Wiest. HR 10/1/1914

George F. Whildin 1914.09.13
The funeral of the late George F. Whildin, who died at his home in Big Rock last Thursday morning (September 24, 1914), was held Sunday and was attended by a large company of his friends. He was one of the oldest residents of that section, and one of the founders of the noted Whildin family. The services were in charge of Rev. E. W. Lounsbury, and interment was made at the Kaneville Cemetery. HR 10/1/1914

Thomas Thompson 1914.10.01
Much surprise came late yesterday (October 7, 1914) afternoon when word was received that Tommy Thompson, a well known farmer and dealer in good horses had committed suicide by hanging himself.
Thompson was a bachelor and lived with his hired man and wife, who came to town in the afternoon and upon their return found Thompson hanging in the barn dead.
No reason is assigned for his rash act. The coroner of Kendall county will hold an inquest this morning.
——————-
Thomas Thompson, tenant on one of Comrade James Hatch’s farms, was found hanging by a rope in the barn yesterday evening (October 7, 1910). There is no reason assigned for Mr. Thompson’s act. He was a bachelor and a Mrs. Murphy of Aurora kept house for him. He always bore a good record, and was well liked by his landlord and neighbors. The suicide was discovered about 4:30 Wednesday afternoon when helpers on the farm went into the barn and were met by the gruesome sight. HR 10/8/1914

Ann Catherine Neer Darnell 1914.10.02
The funeral services of Mrs. Benjamin Darnell were held at Plano on Friday, October 9, 1914. She was born at Harpers Ferry, Virginia June 24, 1839 and was married to Benjamin Darnell April 7, 1858. To them were born nine children, five of whom survive–George and Charles Darnell of Plano, Thomas Darnell of Sandwich, James Darnell of DeKalb and John Darnell of Rush Center, KS, besides three brothers, James Neer of Salem, Oregon, Barton of San Diego, and John of Grandin, MO. Also sixteen grandchildren and six great grandchildren.
——————–
Ann C. Neer was the second child of William and Dorcas Neer. She was born at Harper’s Ferry, VA, June 24, 1839. She had four brothers, James, John George and Barton, and one sister—Mary. Of these, her brother George and sister, Mary, preceded her in death.
Her brother James now resides at Salem, OR, Barton at San Diego, CA, and John at Grandin, MO.
Miss Neer came to Illinois with her parents when she was six or seven years of age; they settled near what is now Bristol Station, and until during the days of the Civil War the family resided in the vicinity of Plano. Some time in the ‘60s her parents moved to a farm near Rochelle where the family resided until a recent date.
Miss Neer was married to Benjamin A. Darnell April 7, 1858. There were born to them nine children, four of whom—Frank, Henry, Helen and Barton—are now deceased.
She leaves her husband, Benjamin Darnell, and sons, George and Charles of Plano, Thomas of Sandwich, James of DeKalb, John of Rush Center, KS, sixteen grandchildren and six great grandchildren.
Early in life Mrs. Darnell united with the Christian Church, in which religious body she held her membership until recent years when she united with the Baptist Church and at the time of her death was a member of the Plano Baptist Church.
Mrs. Darnell has always been a frail woman, yet because of her great will power and determination succeeded in keeping up her physical strength much beyond what her appearance would indicate.
She was a kind, devoted, and patient mother and wife.
Her last sickness was of a few days. She began gradually to fail about two weeks ago and passed away Tuesday noon (October 7, 1914) in Plano at the age of 75 years, 3 months and 12 days.
The funeral services were held in the Plano Methodist Episcopal Church Friday, October 9, Rev. A. L. Fisher officiating. HR 10/29/1914

Belle Campbell Mitchell 1914.10.19
The remains of Mrs. Mitchell, a former Sandwich resident, were brought here from Aurora Saturday morning, the funeral being held on Saturday afternoon at the home of her mother on West Church Street. The services were conducted by Rev. D. M. Ogilvie and the interment was at Oak Ridge Cemetery.
Belle Campbell was born June 10, 1863, at Somonauk, IL, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Horace A. Campbell. Her early life was spent in Somonauk, her parents moving onto a farm north of Sandwich when she was about 18 years of age.
On July 15, 1886, she was united in marriage to Mr. Frank Mitchell. They resided on farms north of Somonauk for a number of years, moving to Sandwich when Mrs. Mitchell’s health failed. Later they returned to their farm near Waterman and spent a season, moving from there about two years ago to Aurora.
Mrs. Mitchell has been in poor health for several years, being a great sufferer, dropsy being the immediate cause of her death, which occurred on October 22, 1914, being at the time aged 51 years, four months and 12 days.
One daughter Mrs. Roy North, was born to this couple, who with her bereaved husband and her mother, Mrs. Campbell, and one sister, Mrs. Nellie Carpenter, are left to mourn her death.
———————-
Mr. and Mrs. J. N. Price, Mrs. Mary Williams, Mrs. Emma Bastian and Mrs. George Averill drove to Sandwich Saturday in the Price car to attend the funeral of Mrs. Frank Mitchell who died at her Sandwich home last week Mrs. Mitchell was a beneficiary member of the Hinckley camp of Royal Neighbors, and was beloved by her wide circle of acquaintances here.
HR 10/29/1914

James Rowe 1914.10.24
Speeding down hill at the rate of fifty five miles an hour, with another man’s wife in the seat with him, Jim Rowe’s automobile struck a nail, the tire went down, the car plunged over into the ditch and turned turtle, and Mr. Rowe was killed and the woman, Mrs. VanStone, was hurt, over on the Kaneville road yesterday evening (October 7, 1914) about four o’clock. The pair were driving from DeKalb, where both are well known, to Aurora, and the accident happened on the hill near the Ford Benton farm. It is presumed that when the nail entered the tire it caused the car to deflect from its course, and, as witnesses say, the couple were traveling fifty five miles an hour, the shock was sufficient to hurl the big car to the side of the highway.
Mrs. VanStone stated that they were hustling to Aurora in order to get there before the banks closed. The body of Mr. Rowe and the smashed car were picked up later in the evening and taken to Aurora. HR 10/8/1914

Charles Olson 1914.10.25
Charles Olson, a well known farmer near Sycamore, was driving to town last week with a load of milk for the Borden Plant, when he was struck by a work train engine near the Williams farm, and suffered fatal injuries.
Mrs. Otto Mueller, who was going to Sycamore, just back of the Olson wagon, says she did not hear the engine whistle for the crossing. The work train was going into the yards to get out of the way of a fast train to come in a few minutes.
The wagon and load were thrown forward by the impact, pinning one of the horses to the ground. The other horse broke loose and ran to Sycamore. Mr. Olson was thrown some distance. The train crew picked him up and hurried to town, but the victim lived but a short time. He had several friends and acquaintances in Hinckley and Waterman. HR 10/15/1914

Mabel Isabella Owen Miller 1914.10.26
Mrs. Isaac Miller died Sunday night at Dr. C. H. Wilkinson’s hospital. Two weeks ago the family accompanied her to Waterman from Englevale, ND, all hoping the change might prove a benefit. The trip was tiresome and she was worse for a few days following, but every care and attention a nurse and doctor could give was administered. Her illness dated back three years and was a chronic lung affliction.
The funeral was held Tuesday afternoon at the Methodist Church, Rev. C. F. Graeser delivering the address, and interment was at Clinton Cemetery.
Mary Isabella Owen was born in Perry County, PA, November 22, 1849, and died October 25, 1914, in Waterman. She was united in marriage to Isaac B. Miller February 6, 1873, and to them were born eight children. Seven survive and are: Walter, married, and resides at Genoa; Mrs. Elsie Davis, Frank, Clayton and Miss Cora of Waterman, Miss Olive and Russell lived at home. Also surviving are the husband and two grandchildren.
Mr. and Mrs. Miller moved from Pennsylvania to Waterman in 1900 and to Englevale, ND, five years ago. The winters of 1912 and 1913 were spent in New Mexico, all with a view of benefit to her declining health.
Mrs. Miller possessed a natural Christian character and was always affiliated with some church. While at Waterman she was a member of the Methodist society and an active worker in the W. C. T. U. HR 10/29/1914

Mrs. J. R. Marshall 1914.11.18
The sympathy of the press of Illinois is extended to Hon. John R; Marshall of Yorkville, whose wife passed away Tuesday morning (November 3, 1914). The suddenness of the death and the unlooked for passing away of this splendid woman makes the grief especially poignant.
Monday afternoon Mr. and Mrs. Marshall drove to Aurora with Dr. and Mrs. McClelland. Mrs. Marshall was in her usual good health, and retired at the usual hour. When Mr. Marshall awoke in the morning he heard his wife’s heavy breathing, and tried to arouse her, but she died before the doctor could be summoned.
She was one of the sweetest dispositioned of mothers and wives; quiet and unassuming, her home was her world, and for all the long years that Mr. Marshall has been in public life, she has been an ideal home-maker and helpmate for him. She will be deeply mourned by all the relatives and her wide circle of friends. Mrs. Marshall leaves besides her husband, a son, Hugh R. Marshall, editor of the Kendall County Record; Mrs. William A. Colledge of Evanston, and Mrs. R. A. McClelland of Yorkville. The funeral is being held this afternoon.
HR 11/5/1914

Charles W. Norton 1914.11.19
A host of friends and many relatives were shocked to hear of the death of Charles W. Norton Sunday morning, November 8, 1914. For many weeks he had been ailing with heart trouble, but the end was sudden and many are saddened.
Mr. Norton was born on the Norton homestead in Squaw Grove Township January 18, 1854, and his whole life has been spent in this township. December 21, 1875, he married Miss Jennie Crosby of Kaneville, and to them were born four children—Elmer, Pearl Carrie, now Mrs. Thomas Austin, and Edna. Edna passed away in 1889, and the other three children remain with the wife and mother to mourn the passing of this excellent son, husband and father.
Funeral services were held Tuesday, conducted by Rev. W. W. Diehl of the Hinckley Methodist Church, and interment was made in Greenwood Cemetery. The bearers were Arch Evans, James Hastie, William Ashton, John Price, John Jones and Eddie Ashton. HR 11/12/1914

Mrs. Hugh Price 1914.11.20
Word was received in Hinckley the first of the week that Mrs. Hugh Price of Sandwich had passed away. She had been ailing for a long time with diabetes, but the news of her death was a sad shock to her many friends and relatives here. Mrs. Price was a sister of Mrs. George Taylor of Hinckley, and a sister-in-law of the Price and Ashton families here. A wide circle of friends and close relatives grieve over the passing of this good woman. The funeral was held yesterday.
HR 11/12/1914

William F. Nehring 1914.11.21
Mr. William Nehring, 92 years old, slipped and fell at the home of his daughter, Mrs. Pauline Graniert, Saturday morning (November 14, 1914), and it is thought the fall later resulted in his death. Up to a year or so ago, Mr. Nehring was very active for one so well advanced in years. He is one of the staunch German pioneers of this country, the father of a well known family, and a popular favorite with all who have known him these many years. The funeral is being held this afternoon and will be largely attended. Obituary next week. HR 11/191/1914
——————–
The funeral of the late William Nehring was held from St. Paul’s Church Thursday afternoon, following a brief service at the home of his daughter, Mrs. Paulina Graniert.
Mr. Nehring was one of the grand old German pioneers who came to this country in an early day to settle the then western wilds. For over sixty years he has been a familiar figure in this community, the last six years being spent with his daughter, Mrs. Graniert, in Hinckley.
Up to a year ago his daily visits down town afforded him much pleasure, but during the past few months he has been blind and gradually failing in health. The morning before he died, Mr. Nehring fell on the floor in the sitting room while going to his chair from the bathroom and it is thought that possibly the fall was provoked by a slight paralytic stroke.
William F. Nehring was born in Tonsdorf, Beiszenburg, Germany, January 28, 1824, and died in Hinckley, November 15, 1914, at the age of 90 years, 9 months and 27 days.
The funeral was attended by a vast throng of old friends, neighbors and relatives, and was in charge of Pastor R. Mernitz of St. Paul’s. Music was furnished by the entire church chorus.
The surviving children are John Nehring of Roseview, Saskatchewan, Canada; Mrs. E. H. Peckman, Mrs. Paulina Graniert, August Nehring, Mrs. Edward Stahl, Mrs. Alfred Carlson of this vicinity; Henry Nehring of Briercrest, Saskatchewan, Canada, and Mrs. Emma Stahl of Downers Grove, IL. Besides the children there are many grandchildren and eighteen great grandchildren. HR 11/26/1914

Fred H. Miller 1914.12.03
Fred Miller, a well known barber in this part of the state, who worked in Hinckley a couple of years ago for Will Haffron, and who also worked for some time for C. C. Martin, committed suicide at Yorkville Monday morning (December 14, 1914) by lying in front of a railroad engine and allowing the engine to run over his body. He was talking with the engine men and as the engineer swung into his cab and pulled the throttle Fred ran around in front of the engine and he was killed before the engineer could stop.
Deceased was a brother-in-law of former Mayor John E. Reddock of Yorkville, and was working in Mr. Reddock’s shop at the time of his death. The coroners jury returned a verdict of suicide, and Mr. Miller was buried in his mother’s lot in the Yorkville Cemetery. —Hinckley Review. 12/19/1914
———————
Fred H. Miller was born in Rever, Hanover, Germany, September 21, 1835, and came to America in 1885, immediately taking up his trade as mason. For many years he has made his home in Hinckley, where his superb integrity and honesty won for him a wide circle of staunch friends. His wife died about eight years ago, and since then he has lived here in his home, working daily.
Twelve weeks ago there came to him the first real illness that he had ever experienced. A severe headache was pronounced neuralgia, and this was followed by a slight stroke of paralysis. The next day he left for Aurora to visit his daughter, Mrs. VanSickle. Two weeks later he went to Savannah to visit two other daughters, and he gradually grew weaker and weaker until he had to take to his bed, from which he said he would never rise again.
He was delirious most of the time, but just before his death on Monday, he had full possession of his faculties.
The remains were brought to Hinckley, and Pastor Mernitz of St. Paul’s had charge of the service which was held yesterday morning, and interment was in the family lot by the side of his wife.
Mr. Miller leaves close relatives in Germany, and four children in America, Charles Miller of Aurora, Mrs. Charles VanSickle of Aurora, and Mrs. J. Frederick and Mrs. G. Showalter of Savannah, besides thirteen grandchildren.
HR 1/21/1914

James William Huey 1914.12.15
James William Huey was born at Pinckneyville, Perry County, IL, May 10, 1857, and May 9, 1886 he was married to Mrs. Lou Ann McCormick. Tuesday morning, December 8, 1914, at 5:15 o’clock, he passed away suddenly with heart trouble.
He joined the Waterman M. E. Church by letter, in 1908, and was a member of the Waterman Camp of M. W. A.
He leaves to mourn his departure a wife, three sons—Charles N., Ray E. and Franklin J., and two daughter—Daisy A. and Mrs. Jesse Hardy; two step-daughters—Mrs. Ed Crisler and Mrs. Robert Brakey; one sister, Mrs. Amanda Flowers, living at Pinckneyville.
For a number of years Mr. Huey and family have lived near Waterman, but last February they moved 2½ miles northwest of Paw Paw, where at 10 o’clock Thursday morning, December 10, 1914, the services were held, Rev. Mr. Otjen officiating.
Music was rendered by Mr. and Mrs. Hicks of Paw Paw.
The bearers were modern Woodmen of the Paw Paw and Waterman Camps. Burial was in Johnson Grove Cemetery.
HR 12/17/1914

Gudman Christopher 1914.12.17
Gudman Christopher fell last Friday and landing upon his head, never regained consciousness and died Monday morning (December 14, 1914) at his home southwest of Hinckley.
He was 41 years of age and leaves a wife, a sister of Enoch Anderson, of Sandwich, and one son, four years old. The funeral services were held at the Lutheran Church at Leland on Wednesday. He leaves a mother, two brothers, John and Martin Christopher, of Leland and four sisters, Mrs. George Miller, Mrs. Gertrude Hetland and Mrs. Jessie Johnson, of Leland and Mrs. Josie Foster of Ames, IA. The funeral services were held at the Lutheran Church in Leland on Wednesday.
———————
Goodman Christopher died at his home near Hinckley, December 15, 1914, from a fractured skull, and lived but a few days without regaining consciousness at the age of 40 years, 2 months and 23 days. The funeral was held at the Lutheran Church at Leland.
January 10, 1899, he was united in marriage to Miss Mary Anderson. This union was blessed with two children; a daughter died in infancy. To mourn his loss are the wife, one son (Gerald), age 5 years, his mother, 4 sisters—Mrs. George Miller and Mrs. Jesse Johnson of Leland, Mrs. Oscar Hatland of Earlville and Mrs. James Foster of Omaha, NE; and 4 brothers—Martin and Noah of Leland, John of Freedom and Benjamin of Sandwich.
Rev. S. A. Johnson officiated and interment was made in the Holverson Cemetery. HR 12/24/1914

Millicent Springer Breeding 1915.01.01
The funeral of Mrs. John C. Breeding was held Sunday afternoon at her country home south of Waterman, where the family has lived for twenty four years. Rev. C. F. Graeser officiated and delivered an appropriate address. Bryce Ferguson and Guy Matteson sang two duets. Four sons–Frank, Davis, Lee and Paul were bearers, and interment was at Johnson Grove Cemetery.
Miss Millicent Springer was born August 10, 1844 near Millbrook, IL, and died January 29, 1915, after two months illness. She was the daughter of Rev. Davis Springer, a Methodist preacher, who had a charge in Kendall County. February 9, 1862 she was united in marriage with John C. Breeding, and to them were born ten children–eight boys and two girls One of each died in early childhood. Those surviving are: John C., of Joliet, Lee of Plymouth, IN, Paul of Clear Lake, IA, Frank, Harry, Davis, and Roy of this vicinity, and Mrs. Frank Kalsey of Kirksville, MO. Mrs. Breeding was one of the admirable pioneer mothers who worked, loved, and prayed, living and striving for her home and family. The aged husband, now 80 years, will deeply miss her sympathy and care. Also to mourn her passing is one brother, Thomas Springer, of Aurora, and one sister, Mrs. Sarah Reaner of California. The children were all present during her last sickness, and all were at the funeral, with the exception of Mrs. Kalsey.
Mr. and Mrs. Breeding’s golden wedding period on February 9, 1912, proved a delightful occasion for the good mother, when all the nine children, and a score of grandchildren enjoyed the home hospitalities. —Hinckley Review. 2/4/1915

W. Gordon Davis 1915.01.05
W. Gordon Davis was born November 12, 1844 in Ogdensburg, Canada. His parents came to the States when he was but a babe in arms and settled in Victor Township. This remained his residence until 22 years ago when he moved to Sandwich.
January 12, 1871 he was married to Miss Ellen Morton of the same neighborhood. They were hard-working, thrifty people and quite successful in their endeavors. And 1893 they retired from the farm making Sandwich their home.
Mr. Davis was a quiet and an unassuming man, but he had a host of friends. He was an accommodating neighbor and a true friend, and thoroughly honest and upright in all his dealings.
Besides his companion, he is survived by his mother, two brothers, Levi L., of Humboldt, NE, and Jason M., residing near Waterman, and three sisters, Mrs. Charles Morgan of Victor, Mrs. Mary Harper of Paw Paw, and Miss Allie Davis.
The funeral will be held at his late home tomorrow afternoon (January 29, 1915), conducted by Dr. James. M. Lewis. The burial will be at Oak Ridge Cemetery. HR 2/4/1915

C. C. Lovejoy 1915.01.10
Rev. C. C. Lovejoy died January 27, 1915 at Winter Haven, FL. The deceased served as president of the Jenning’s Seminary at Aurora, and was the minister in the Rock River Conference until year ago, when he retired. His last charge was at Seneca, IL. He was 70 years old at the time of his death and has been a victim of heart trouble for some years. During 1907 and 1908 he was pastor at Waterman M. E. Church. He was a great student and natural teacher. Surviving are his wife and one adopted daughter, also one brother, Dr. Walter Lovejoy of Maywood. Last fall before Rev. and Mrs. Lovejoy moved to Florida they were guest at H. L. Fuller’s for several days.
——————–
Rev. C. C. Lovejoy died Wednesday, January 27, 1915, at Winter Haven, FL, where he and Mrs. Lovejoy moved last fall, hoping the southern climate would prove of benefit to his health. He served many years as pastor in the Rock River Conference and was located at Waterman in 1907 and 1908. His last regular pastorate work was at Seneca. Jennings Seminary at Aurora prospered under his presidency; he was always a student and a natural teacher. In the early fall, before going to Florida, Rev. and Mrs. Lovejoy spent several days at H. F. Fuller’s and it afforded great pleasure to their many friends to see them looking forward to a delightful southern home during their period of retirement. Surviving are his wife, one adopted daughter, and one brother, Dr. Walter C. Lovejoy, of Maywood. Deceased was 70 years of age. HR 2/4/1915

Edward Leifheit 1915.01.11
Edward Leifheit was the son of William and Carolina Eckhardt Leifheit, and was born November 18, 1852, three miles east of Sandwich in Kendall County. He was the third of a family of six brothers and five sisters. Three sisters have passed away in former years and Ed was the first of the brothers to be called.
At the age of nineteen he decided to become a miner and left the old home to seek his fortune, first working in the Rock Island mines. He had an accident which crippled his leg, and for a short time he was in the meat market business at Big Rock, but finally returned to his chosen trade.
The last of the week relatives here heard of his illness at Springfield, and Mr. Dolph Leifheit and daughter went to Springfield to visit him. They found him in the hospital, in a semi-conscious condition, and he passed away early Monday morning (January 18, 1915).
Mr. Leifheit leaves to mourn his loss five brothers and two sisters—Charles, Harve, Dolph, and Ernest Leifheit of Hinckley, William Leifheit of Minnesota, and Mrs. Ernest Granart and Mrs. Louis Granart of Hinckley.
The body was brought here, and the funeral was held from St. Paul’s Church Wednesday afternoon, Pastor Mernitz having charge. The six nephews–Melvin, Irvin and Will Leifheit, Lester and Harley Granart, and Will Jurris acting as bearers.
HR 1/21/1915

Mrs. Adam Stark 1915.01.12
Word was received here Tuesday morning that Mrs. Adam Stark of Minneapolis had passed away at the hospital Sunday (January 24, 1915). For several weeks Mrs. Stark was a sufferer from rheumatism, which extended to the heart, then paralysis. In the later stage of her illness it was thought some improvement was shown, and slight hopes were entertained for her recovery. She leaves a beautiful little three year old daughter and the husband. Friends and relatives in Hinckley and Naperville extend their sincere sympathy as this is the second wife he has lost. Miss Marion Stark, a charming daughter of twenty years by Mr. Stark’s first wife, will be at home with her father and the little half-sister. HR 1/28/1915

Ben Broughton 1915.01.13
Death has claimed Ben Broughton after an illness of less than one week from meningitis, at his home in Lake View, IA.
Mrs. John Woods (nee Ella Broughton) has visited her brother and family at their “Sunny Slope” farm, where he specialized in purebred Hereford cattle and Poland China hogs.
Mr. Broughton was born in Afton Township forty four years ago next May and died January 28, 1915. He was married to Miss Alice Cleveland of the same community, who survives him, with two children, Marie, age 17, and Preston, age 9. There are two sisters, Mrs. Woods of Waterman and Mrs. J. J. Kingsley of DeKalb and one brother, Preston, at Lee Summit, MO, and two half brothers, Charles of DeKalb and Chauncey of Carlton. Mr. Broughton was prominent in every welfare improvement for his home town. HR 2/4/1915

Robert Weber 1915.02.01
Robert Weber, aged 43 years, died Sunday (February 14, 1915) at the St. Charles Hospital, Aurora of pernicious anemia. He had been ill for the past year but had been able to be about most of the time. His wife, Gertrude, and a son Harry, survive him.
The body was shipped to Hinckley Tuesday morning and the funeral was held from the Methodist Church there at 1:30 p.m.. The Rev. Mr. Diehl officiated. Interment was in the Greenwood Cemetery. The deceased was a former well known resident of Sandwich. He was a brother of H. F. Weber and Mrs. Ralph Robinson of this city.
———————–
Many friends were shocked Sunday to hear of the very low condition of Robert Weber of Aurora, son of F. Weber of Hinckley, and were saddened indeed to hear the news of his death Sunday evening, February 14, 1915.
Robert Weber was born in Sandwich, July 10, 1871, and attended the city schools until sixteen years of age, when he came with his parents to the present farm home of the Weber family south of Hinckley. When nineteen years old, he began learning the brick layers trade, and he developed into one of the most expert men of that trade in this part of the country. He was a hard worker, careful, an expert mechanic and a keen money maker; a man of rugged and stalwart frame.
In 1907 he went to Seattle, WA, returning to Illinois and settling in Aurora fouryears ago, where he resided at the time of his death.
He was married October 27, 1894, to Miss Gertrude Leonard, a Sandwich girl, who was associated with her husband in the confectionery and restaurant business in Hinckley for some years. One manly son, Harry, survives with Mrs. Weber, and he is a great comfort to his mother at this sad time. Besides the widow and son, Robert Weber is survived by his father, Mr. Ferdinand Weber, and by five brothers—Henry, Herman, Ferdinand, Jr., Will and Otto; and by four sisters—Mrs. Claude Farmer, Mrs. Ralph Robertson, Misses Bertha and Tillie Weber. The taking of this young man leaves a deep void in the family circle, and many true friends here grieve with the stricken ones.
The funeral was held from the Methodist Church in Hinckley Tuesday afternoon and all the immediate relatives were here. Rev. W. W. Diehl preached a comforting sermon, and Mrs. Maude Dewey and Mrs. Hattie Fry sang the hymns with Mrs. Kennedy at the piano. The bearers were F. C. Schmidt, H. H. Leifheit, C. O. Dean, S. B. Ward, E. H. Peckman and R. D. Chappell. Burial was in Greenwood Cemetery in the Weber lot.
HR 2/18/1915

Wallace Gilchrist 1915.02.03
Wallace Gilchrist was born in West Hebron, Washington County, NY, June 6, 1848. He died at the home of his brother, Albert in Sandwich, IL, February 3, 1915, at the age of 66 years, 7 months, 27 days.
Mr. Gilchrist came down from the UP neighborhood Wednesday afternoon for dinner and for a visit at the home of his brother. About 2 o’clock, when ready to start for home, he was taken with violent pains and he continued to grow worse. Dr. G. S. Culver was called, but he was beyond all earthly help. Neuralgia of the heart is given as the cause of death.
He was the son of Joseph and Martha J. Randall Gilchrist. He came with his parents to Illinois in the spring of 1864, living the first year at Freeland Corners.
The following spring the family moved to Clinton Township to the farm owned and occupied by the youngest son, Andrew. At the age of 22 he began working at the carpenters trade and for nine years followed this trade, working in the immediate locality of his home.
On December 29, 1881 he was united in marriage to Miss Sarah Jane Stott of Argyle, NY.
To them one child was born, Raymond J., who was spared to them one year and six months.
After his marriage, he with his bride moved to the farm which he had previously purchased in Sugar Grove Township, which he worked until two years ago, when he retired from active farm work, renting his fields, and remaining on the farm.
He was one of a large family of children. Of these but three remain, Albert L., of Sandwich, Andrew of Clinton Township, and Mrs. Jennie McKnight of Washington County, NY. These with his widow are left to mourn his departure. He was interested in every movement extended toward the betterment of the community, both social and religious.
For many years he was a breeder of registered stock and had as wide an acquaintance, perhaps, as any man in the county. His friends were numbered by the score and his hospitality was known to all who visited at his farm.
He was a member of the M. W. of A. and took a great pleasure in the thought that he was helping to lighten the burden of the family of a deceased neighbor.
The funeral services were held on Saturday, February 6 at the UP Church, of which he had long been a member, and a large attendance was evidence of the esteem of those who knew him. Funeral services were conducted by his pastor, Rev. John Atchison, whose address was very beautiful and touching. The singing was done by a mixed quartet composed of George Howison, Wells Fay, Mrs. Atchison, and Mary Howison with Miss Mary Graham as pianist. Burial was at Oak Mound Cemetery.
———————-
Word reached Hinckley and Waterman early Thursday morning (February 4, 1915) of the death of Wallace Gilchrist of the U. P. District.
Wallace Gilchrist, a leader in the U. P. Church and its affiliated brotherhood, a prominent farmer and breeder of thoroughbred stock, active in political and social circles, a man who numbered his friends by the hundreds in every community, drove to his brother Albert’s home in Sandwich Wednesday morning and remained for luncheon. Following luncheon he was taken ill; a doctor was summoned, but relief was not to be had, and he died early in the evening of acute indigestion.
Mr. Gilchrist was between sixty five and seventy years of age, and while he has appeared rugged and robust to his friends the past two years, his health has not been good. His death is a great shock to this part of the county.
The funeral will be held from the United Presbyterian Church Saturday afternoon at 1:30 o’clock. HR 2/4/1915

Wilder Gates Potter 1915.02.08
Supervisor W. G. Potter of Waterman, who has served Clinton Township for eight years in an official capacity, died Tuesday night (February 9, 1915) at his beautiful home in the north part of the village from a malignant stomach malady. Local physicians or the three Chicago specialists, who were consulted, were unable to halt the disease. Probably no person in the community or county had more friends than Mr. Potter. He has not lived 50 years foolishly. He was a good man, reliable and broad enough to see the making of something in everybody and from day to day friends waited eagerly for some rallying change. His two brothers, with his immediate family, were at his bedside, Ed from Colorado Springs, and Bert from Oklahoma.
Mr. Potter was about 53 years of age and has spent his entire life in and about Waterman. He was a prominent farmer and stockman up to five years ago, when he retired from active business and built his beautiful home in the village. As supervisor he was one of the most influential men on the county board.
He is survived by his wife, three daughters, Mrs. Nora Matteson, and Misses Florence and Frances, and one son, Frank. His wife was the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. C. F. Allen, pioneer residents of the middle part of the county who are living in the village at the present time.
He also leaves a sister, Mrs. Orvis Stryker and two brothers, Edward Potter of Colorado Springs, and Bert, of Blackhawk, OK.
The funeral will be held this afternoon at 2 o’clock from the M. E. Church in Waterman, of which church the deceased has been an official and a faithful member for many years.
——————-
Friends all over the county were shocked yesterday morning (February 10, 1915) to hear of the death of Supervisor George W. Potter of Clinton Township at his home in Waterman. Local physicians and trained nurses had combated his malady ever since he was stricken the first of December. He died of cancer of the stomach.
Mr. Potter was fifty three years of age, born and raised in Clinton Township, and was one of the most popular men in this part of the county. Quiet and unassuming in his personal manners, a staunch Methodist man of decided Christian principles, always upright and honorable in all his many business dealings, his death will leave a great void in the church, social and political circles of this county. He was born a farmer and followed the agricultural and stock business until about five years ago, when he bought a handsome home in Waterman and retired. He has always been active in the uplift of his community; always a Republican, he has served community well in places of public trust, and on the board of supervisors he was always assigned to important committees. He was just closing his fourth term, which would have expired in April, and he could have been reelected without opposition had it been his desire.
The widow, who was the only daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Charles F. Allen, comes from one of the oldest pioneer families of Clinton Township, and survives him, with four children—Mrs. William Matteson, Saskatchewan, Canada; and Misses Florence and Frances, and Frank Potter, all young people still at home. The Mattesons have been here since the holidays and did not intend returning north until March first, so Mrs. Matteson has been with her father through all his illness.
The funeral was held at 2 o’clock this afternoon from the Methodist Church in Waterman, of which he has long been a member and officer. Three grandchildren are also left to mourn the loss of an indulgent father. HR 2/11/1915
——————
Sympathizing friends of Supervisor W. G. Potter’s family filled every seat and space at the Methodist Church Thursday afternoon. Rev. C.F. Graeser delivered an extremely touching address. Rev. W. H. Otjen of Compton and Rev. W. M. White assisted in the service. Miss Myrtis Garner presided at the pipe organ and accompanied Guy Matteson, Bryce Ferguson, F. H. Giles and R. C. Fay in two hymns. The tribute of flowers was unusually choice, the clusters banking the gray couch casket; especially attractive was the large wreath from DeKalb County’s Board of Supervisors. The bearers were L. A. Matteson, W. J. Randles, John Mercer, Humphry Roberts, A. C. Baie and G. E. Deming, and burial was in the family lot at Clinton Cemetery.
At the service, seats of prominence were rendered the following leading citizens and supervisors; J. H. Jarboe, Frank Wright, J. W. Lattimer, W. G. Eckhardt, G. M. Tindall of DeKalb; S. M. Henderson, Sycamore; W. G. Baie, Hinckley; Lee Kellum, Sandwich; W. P. Raymond, Cortland; Will Storey, Shabbona; George Hyde, Rollo; Hampton White, Somonauk. Out of town relatives were Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Marion, Mr. and Mrs. William Rich, Miss Minnie Winteringham, Clyde Fuller, Roy Mercer of Aurora; Mr. and Mrs. Freeman Spencer, Joliet; Mr. and Mrs. Charles Burr, Miss Lizzie Potter, DeKalb, and Ray Allen, Chicago.
Wilder Gates Potter was born June 2, 1861, at Waterman, IL, and here he has lived all his life. He was married to Florence May Allen October 3, 1883. He was converted under Wesley K. Beane, a former pastor of Waterman, and joined on probation January 21, 1877, being received to full connection July 22, of the same year. Mr. Potter had an extraordinary personality. His characteristics were such as to draw men and hold them to him with lifelong tenacity. He had a strange identity with the right. His was an open mind—but open only to the true and the square. Sinister motive and double dealing could not associate with him. He seemed to have keen appreciation of his own course—did others disagree with him, unmolested he left them, and clung to his own conviction. So retiring was he that one was likely to get the impression that he was not aggressive. But his aggressiveness had the subtlety of steadiness and persistency. He did not blow a horn or beat a drum to announce his coming or going, his saying or his doing—all was unaffected as the certain efficacy of a ray of light or a wave of warmth. Wherever he identified himself, and whatever he did, as husband or father, as member and official in the church, as citizen, as man, as neighbor and friend, it was ever and only as Wilder could, each relation, each office, each function was marked with his serenity and his sincerity, his sympathy and his simplicity, his stability and his sturdiness.
It was not until about the first week in December that his health seemed below normal, but gradually his condition became graver until expert diagnosis, by three specialists working independently, pronounced his trouble to be cancer of the stomach. This interfering with the physical functions brought on his death which occurred February 9, 1915.
Those nearest to him, and who shall miss most his helpful association are his wife, his daughters, Mrs. Nora Matteson, Florence and Frances, and his son Frank; his brothers Ed of Colorado Springs, and Bert of Blackwell, OK, and his sister, Mrs. Emma Stryker of Waterman. HR 2/18/1915

Martha Williams Henderson 1915.02.11
Death claimed Mrs. Alex Henderson after suffering with rheumatism for 35 years. Not continually has the malady confined her to bed but scarcely a day would pass without some pain from the ravaging disease.
Mrs. Henderson has lived on a farm in Clinton Township and in Waterman for 52 years. She was a good neighbor and esteemed by all. She was affiliated with the Baptist Church and remained a believer in that faith and creed until death. She became the wife of Mr. Henderson and was brought to his home where three young children were left motherless, and one beautiful deed in her life is that she reared and has been a mother to the family.
Miss Martha Williams was born January 10, 1831, in Clearfield, PA, and died February 8, 1915, at her home in Waterman. She was married June 2, 1863, to Alex Henderson, who is 83 years old and at present very feeble. Also surviving is S. M. Henderson, clerk of DeKalb County, and Mrs. Sarah Hampton of Texaline, TX.
Funeral service was held Wednesday at her late home at 1:30 o’clock. Rev. C. F. Graeser and W. W. White officiated. Interment was in Johnson Grove Cemetery.
–Hinckley Review 2/11/1915

Edgar Gates 1915.02.14
Edgar Gates, the 10-year-old son of Mr. and Mrs. Fred Gates, lies dead as a result on accident on Tuesday night (February 17, 1915) when he was shot by his older brother, Vernon “Buster” Gates, 12 years old. The shooting happened on the farm home of the Gates family, known as the VanEmon farm, about two miles east of Yorkville on the Oswego Road. The boys had been playing with a gun in company with their father and, when he went to do the chores, they were told to put the rifle away. This they did not do, and while trying to get a shell from the gun, it was discharged, the 22 caliber bullet striking Edgar just over the heart, causing almost instant death.
———————
Mr. and Mrs. R. D. Chappell are in Yorkville today attending the funeral of little ten year old Edgar Gates, who was accidentally shot at the farm home Monday evening (February 15, 1915). He was coming home from school with his older brother and on the way they stopped to borrow a 22 caliber rifle from a little school mate. When they reached home their father instructed them to carry the gun to the house and not play with it. In some way the little fellows got a shell stuck in the gun, and in attempting to get it out the gun exploded and the bullet entered Edgar’s breast just above the heart. He died almost instantly. His mother had started from town just before the accident happened and could not be reached on the road, and was prostrated when she drove into the yard and learned the news. It is a sad blow to family and relatives as the little fellow was a great favorite with all. HR 2/18/1915

M. D. Warren 1915.02.24
M. D. Warren, one of Paw Paw’s most respected citizens, died at his home Tuesday morning (February 2, 1915). Mr. Warren was about 47 years of age and had lived in this vicinity all his life.
He has been in ill health and for the past year he has been a constant sufferer. He leaves a wife, two daughters and one son besides two brothers. The funeral will be held this (Thursday) afternoon at the M. E. Church with interment in Wyoming Cemetery.—Lee County Times.
Mr. Warren was well known in Hinckley where he has made weekly visits for several years, buying the poultry that has been raised hereabouts. For several years he was with the Legg firm, and later the George Frye commission firm, and as he served as purchasing agent for these people, he won many friends for his honesty and squareness in dealing with all. He was well known to all the poultry raisers and shippers in this part of the county.
HR 2/4/1915
Lorenzo J. Lamson 1915.02.25
Lorenzo J. Lamson was born on the Lamson farm near Freeland Corners October 1, 1840, and died at his home in Chicago Friday morning, February 5, 1915, from hardening of the arteries of the heart, which was augmented by pneumonia.
People in this vicinity remember M. Lamson as one of those kindly, generous gentlemen of the old school—a man who has fared well in this world’s goods and always ready to help in the relief of those less fortunate. February 20, 1868, he was married to Miss Ida C. Fay, sister of Mrs. E. P. Gardner and sister-in-law of Mrs. Flora Fay of Hinckley, and during the summer months he made frequent trips out here with his folks, and our people came to know him quite intimately.
Soon after his marriage the young people moved to Iowa, where he engaged in the osage business; at the time of the Chicago fire he bought a stone quarry south of the city and operated a big business in that for many years; then he went to Michigan and engaged in the fruit farming business, and later he bought a seat on the board of trade and was in the firm with his brother, a man of eighty years who still survives him. The latter years of this great business career he has been connected with his son Warren Lamson and his son-in-law, L F. Gates.
The funeral was held from the home in Chicago Sunday, and among those who attended from here were L. E. Davis, Mr. and Mrs. Will Weiss, and Mrs. Flora Fay. HR 2/11/1915

Mrs. Edward (McCormick) Grady 1915.02.26
After a long struggle for health, Mrs. Grady quietly passed away at 2 o’clock Saturday morning (February 28, 1915) at the family residence in Waterman. The many friends of the family will deeply sympathize with the bereaved husband and children in their deep affliction which came unexpectedly. Besides her husband, Mrs. Grady leaves five children, Mrs. James Donlin and Mrs. Brubeard of Shabbona; Miss Nellie, Dan and Will, who reside at home; one sister, Mrs. Kate Keyser, and two brothers, Thomas McCormick of DeKalb and John of Shabbona. Relatives from out of town were Mrs. Keyser of Chicago, Mr. and Mrs. George Grady of New Hartford, IA; Mr. and Mrs. Messier and Miss Nelly of Cedar Falls, IA. The funeral was held Monday at Lee and the remains were interred in Calvary Cemetery. HR 3/4/1915

George Lentz 1915.02.27
Friday morning, February 5, 1915, in answer to the call of early dawn, Mr. George Lentz, of Blackwell, OK, bid farewell to his temporary home and passed on to the mansion not made with hands, eternal in the heavens.
Father Lentz was born in Alsace, Germany, August 12, 1834. He came to America as a youth of 16 years, making his own living and earning his own way. He was one of the early settlers, who helped make Illinois a great state. For some years he resided near Fulton, IL. In 1869 he moved to LaSalle County, IL.
August 27, 1868, he was united in marriage to Miss Magdelene Dolder. Three children were the blessings of this union, John Lentz of Rockford, IL; Mrs. A. L. Hess and Edward Lentz of this city. He leaves two brothers and two sisters, Mrs. Wallace Klein and Fred Lentz of Hinckley, IL, Mrs. Kate Bruck of Kansas City, MO, also three grandchildren and many nieces and nephews.
Mr. Lentz was true to his Christ and trusted God in all his affections. At the age of thirty three he was converted to a living faith in Jesus Christ, and joined the German Evangelical Church, later he united with the Methodist Episcopal Church and has been a member of this church over thirty one years. In 1901, he with his loving wife, moved from Illinois to Oklahoma and made Blackwell his home. Seven years next month his loving helpmate passed on to eternal home and during the past five years has made his home with his daughter, Mrs. A. L. Hess of this city. During the past few years his age and physical afflictions made it impossible for him to get about. God blessed him with 3 score years and ten. He departed at the age of 80 years, 5 months, and 24 days.
Funeral services were held at the home of his daughter, Mrs. A. L. Hess, Sunday afternoon at 3 p.m., February 7, 1915. Interment was made at the I. O. O. F. Cemetery, Rev. Rudolph C. Doenges, pastor of the Blackwell M. E. Church, officiating.
HR 3/11/1915
Charles E. Weaver 1915.03.03
Charles E. Weaver died Monday March 22, 1915 at the East Side Hospital in Waterman. Deceased was 50 years old, born near Cortland, this county. He has been in poor health for a year suffering from Bright’s disease. Eight weeks ago he came to the Waterman hospital and showed symptoms of improvement by the change and treatment. His wife was Miss Maggie McDiarmid. Also surviving are three children, Mrs. Alta Colburn of California; Mrs. Myrtle Bushnell, Big Rock, and Norman of DeKalb; Mr. Weaver was the youngest brother of Mrs. Elmer Simpson of Waterman and one brother lives at St. Petersburg, FL, and a half sister, Miss Mary Weaver of California. He was an uncle of Mrs. John W. Dean of Sandwich.
———————
Charles E. Weaver died Monday, March 22, 1915 at the East Side Hospital in Waterman. Deceased was 50 years old, born in DeKalb County near Cortland. He has been in poor health for a year, suffering from Brights disease. Eight weeks ago he came to the Waterman Hospital and showed symptoms of improvement by the change and treatment. His wife was Miss Maggie McDiarmid. Also surviving are three children, Mrs. Alta Colburn of California; Mrs. Myrtle Bushnell, Big Rock, and Norman of DeKalb. Mr. Weaver was the youngest brother of Mrs. Elmer Simpson of Waterman and one brother lives at St. Petersburg, FL, and a half sister, Miss Mary Weaver of California. He was a brother of the late Homer Weaver of Hinckley. HR 3/25/1915

G. Adolph Schultz 1915.03.15
G. A. Schultz died at Presbyterian Hospital in Chicago last Saturday (March 13, 1915). He had been sick for several months with a disease rare in medical science and for which there seems to be no cure.
He was prominent in Democratic politics and for a number of years was chairman of the DeKalb County Democratic Central Committee.
Mr. Schultz had no relatives of his own. He was brought up in an orphan Asylum and when a mere lad was taken by the Burmeister family in Clinton Township, who gave the boy a good bringing up. He was industrious and a moneymaker and has amassed considerable wealth in the course of his life.
He was married some years ago to the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John Smith of Hinckley and to them were born two daughters and three sons. Some months ago his friends in the county were shocked to hear of marital troubles in the Schultz household which were later followed by divorce proceedings. Mrs. Schultz has recently been living in Hinckley.
Following this litigation he moved to Chicago and went into the real estate business there. He was doing fairly well until his last illness came.
——————–
The remains of A. G. Schultz were brought to Waterman from Chicago Monday evening, and following the funeral this morning from the M. E. Church, burial took place at the Clinton Cemetery.
Mr. Schultz, has known for six weeks he was suffering with a very grave malady—infection of the lymphatic glands—and death claimed its own Sunday night (March 14, 1915) at the Frances Willard Hospital, where he had been cared for some three weeks.
Mr. Schultz had no immediate relatives with the exception of his four children—Alfred, Adlai, Irene and Evelyn. The Reingardt family took him from an orphanage when he was a small lad. He was sturdy, strong and never sick a day; he was industrious, a good lad and in business proceedings amassed considerable wealth. Politically he was a Democrat and a favorite in the party circle; he aspired to be U. S. Marshal and served Clinton Township in many offices of trust. He was 49 years old, leaving the old world right at the prime of life. His wife was one of Mr. and Mrs. John Schmidt’s daughters. Marital trouble came to their household two years ago and a divorce was granted; since, Mrs. Schultz has lived with her two daughters at Hinckley, Mr. Schultz and the boys at Waterman.
Recently he embarked into the real estate business in Chicago; hardly had he got started when he was stricken with the fatal disease. He was a member of the local Masonic fraternity and a Shriner, and the Masons had charge of his funeral;.
At the funeral this morning were hundreds of friends from various parts of the state, especially was there a great representation from other parts of DeKalb County. Mr. Schultz was so widely known in political, lodge and social circles, as well as among the farmers and cement workers with whom he had labored so long, that the church was crowded to the doors. The Hinckley Masonic Lodge was present in a body as a mark of brotherly esteem for their popular frater. Dolph Schultz knew most everybody in Hinckley where he spent much of his time, and everybody knew and liked him. HR 3/18/1915

Martha Robinson Davis 1915.03.24
Martha Robinson, daughter of William and Ann Robinson, was born in Maitland, Canada, December 25, 1825, and passed away March 19, 1915. She was married to Albert Davis December 13, 1843, at Ogdensburg, NY. Mr. Davis died July 28, 1879.
To this union seven children were born, William Gordon, of Sandwich, who died January 27, 1915; Levi L., of Humboldt, NE; George Nelson of Paw Paw, who died April 4, 1892; Lucy M. Morton of Leland; Mary C. Harper of Paw Paw; Jason M. and Allie E., of Waterman.
Mr. and Mrs. Davis came to Illinois May 11, 1845, and settled at Ross Grove. In the fall of 1846 they moved onto the farm where she has since resided.
There are twelve grandchildren and ten great grandchildren left to mourn her death.
Mrs. Davis’ funeral was held Sunday afternoon from her late home. Rev. C. F. Graeser delivered an appropriate address. Mr. and Mrs. Hicks of Paw Paw sang several selections and interment was in Johnson Grove Cemetery by the side of her husband. HR 3/25/1915

Jennie Stott Gilchrist 1915.03.25
By the death of Mrs. Wallace Gilchrist Sunday, March 7, 1915, closes forever one of this community’s homes of hospitality, wealth and happiness. Mr. Gilchrist died February 5, 1915, following an illness of less than six hours, at his brother Albert’s home in Sandwich. Mrs. Gilchrist has been in poor health several years, and following the shock of her husband’s death, she was stricken with typhoid fever. She was brought to the East side Hospital, where she made a good fight, but her low vitality and general weakened condition could not battle the ravaging disease.
Deceased was formerly Miss Jennie Stott, born 66 years ago at Argyle, NY, there being only two months difference between her own and her husband’s ages. She possessed an attractive personality and was a reliable friend.
One son was born who died when 18 months old. The immediate relatives surviving are two sisters and one brother in New York, one sister-in-law, Mrs. David Stott, a niece, Miss Mildred Stott, of Aurora. The funeral service was held Wednesday afternoon at the United Presbyterian Church, Rev. John Acheson officiating, and burial was at Oak Mound Cemetery in the family lot beside her late husband.
So suddenly is the taking away of this family of influence and good character, no one can tell how much they will be missed. HR 3/11/1915

Shad Sills 1915.03.26
Edward Huff, Luman Whitford and sister, Mrs. Crellen Miller of Waterman, attended the funeral of Shad Sills, Monday (March 15, 1915) at Genoa. Deceased would have been 60 years old had he lived until September 23.
When a boy in his teens, he lived many seasons at the homestead of Mr. and Mrs. Wilson Huff. Upon reaching his majority he began braking on the C. B. & Q. R. R, a work he followed until forced to quit by losing his sight. This affliction followed a painful injury when his head was pinched between two cars until blood was forced from his ears, eyes and nose and for ten years he has been totally blind. He made himself a living by selling small articles and notions and traveled alone all over the state.
Mrs. Sills was at the Genoa Hotel when taken sick and lived three days. Surviving are one sister at Rockford and a brother at Pegg, OK. The funeral was held at the undertaker’s home, Rev. H. Pierce of the M. E. church officiating, and burial was at the Genoa Cemetery. HR 3/18/1915

Martha Woods Lamb 1915.03.27
Martha Woods, daughter of David and Catherine Woods, was born in Cumberland County, PA October 27, 1829. In 1846 her parents moved to Kendall County, IL. Here she was married to Lemuel Lamb in 1848. To them were born five children—three sons and two daughters. Those surviving are Mrs. Cassie Roberts, Mr. Henry Lamb and Mrs. Louise Scott, all of Waterman.
In 1859 they moved to Clinton Township, where they lived until the death of her husband in March 1881, at which time she moved to Waterman, where she has since resided, her death occurring at Waterman March 22, 1915.
The funeral was held Wednesday afternoon at the M. E. Church, Rev. C. F. Graeser, pastor and neighbor of deceased, delivered a sermon full of sympathy and kindly feeling. Mrs. Humphrey Roberts and Miss Georgia Davenport sang. Interment was in Clinton Cemetery.
Grandma Lamb has suffered with rheumatism for years—sometimes better and again down in bed. For a year she has been partially paralyzed and had been helpless for the past three months. The final stroke came about a week before death relieved her. She was 84 years old and a person admired by all who had her acquaintance. HR 3/25/1915

August Melhorn 1915.03.28
Word was received this morning at the William VonOhlen home, telling of the death of August Melhorn in California. No particulars were wired, but relatives expect to hear all the details by mail. The telegram came to relatives in Somonauk.
HR 3/25/1915
———————-
The Glen (California) Transcript contains the following account of the tragedy which resulted in the death of August Melhorn, formerly of this vicinity:
August Melhorn, one of the substantial farmers of the Bayliss section, committed suicide Wednesday afternoon (March 24, 1915) by shooting himself with a 32 calibre revolver. The deed was committed at his home. Mrs. Melhorn, who was in another room, heard the report of the gun, and when she reached the side of her husband she found him dead.
Mr. Melhorn had been acting queerly for a year or more. At times he was decidedly off mentally. He had a penchant for writing poetry and recently he took up song writing. He failed to find a publisher and this seemed to worry him. On his last visit to the Transcript office, he complained that the publishers would not accept his writings because they considered him crazy. On Saturday last he was in Willows and his mental condition was bad.
Wednesday of last week he sat at the table with his wife and nephew partaking of the noonday meal. The three had been conversing together on ordinary topics when the husband suddenly arose and went into another room. He informed his wife through the door that he was going to kill himself and that he wanted his nephew to have the ranch. The wife and nephew made a rush for the door to prevent, if possible, his rash act, but they found that Melhorn had placed his back to the door and thus prevented them from opening it. Just then a shot rang out, and as the body slid to the floor they pushed the door open and found that the suicide had sent a bullet far into the center of the forehead causing instant death.
The funeral was held from the old home in Somonauk Monday afternoon, the body having been shipped from the California ranch. Many friends from this vicinity were in attendance as he was well and favorably known in Clinton and Squaw Grove Townships. HR 4/8/1915
——————
The Somonauk Reveille says:
The remains of August Melhorn arrived here from California Tuesday morning. Accompanied by his wife and William George, and the funeral was held at the residence of Mrs. Louise Sampson that afternoon, services being conducted by Rev. F. Suhren. Interment was at Oak Ridge Cemetery.
Mr. Melhorn was born March 31, 1861, at Zwickson, Saxony, Germany. At the age of twenty one years, he emigrated to this country and settled at Hinckley.
He was united in marriage to Miss Mary George of Somonauk, February 27, 1900. Following their marriage they took up their residence at Big Rock and later moved to Sugar Grove and then to Hinckley where they resided until their removal to Willows, CA, five years ago.
In California the deceased engaged in farming but for the past year or two he had been unable to do a great deal of work on account of his health, and he had intended to give up farming the coming fall. His health became quite poor the past few months which caused him considerable anxiety. He was a great reader and took deep interest in current events, and the war In Europe caused him considerable worry.
Mr. Melhorn was a beloved husband, a kind brother and brother-in-law and an obliging neighbor.
William George, who was summoned to California after the death of Mr. Melhorn, informs the Reveille that some of the statements that appeared in the Glen(California) Transcript, from which we copied the account of his death, were not in accordance with the facts. “Mr. Melhorn did not inform his wife, through the door, that he was going to kill himself,” says Mr. George; “furthermore, no one knows whether the shooting was intentional or accidental. He and his wife and nephew were eating dinner and talking together pleasantly when Mr. Melhorn arose from the table and entered an adjoining room, the others remaining seated. A shot rang out, and on entering the room they found him dead.” HR 4/15/1915

Oliver Lichlyter 1915.04.05
Mr. Oliver Lichlyter was born January 24, 1874 in Smyrna Township, Jefferson County, IN, and died April 12, 1915, at his home near Waterman, IL. He was taken last fall with hemorrhages and has had several attacks since and was taken down about two weeks ago with what proved to be the fatal sickness. He was married to Miss Virginia Abbott and to them were born two children, Blanche and Willie, who with their mother are left to mourn the loss of husband and father. He also leaves a father and six brothers and sisters to mourn his death. Services were held at his late home Monday afternoon, conducted by his pastor, Rev. Acheson and the body was taken to the old home in Indiana for burial.
——————–
Sympathy is expressed by everybody over the death of Oliver Lichlyter, the new tenant on Howison Brothers farm. Deceased enjoyed good health until last January. Soon after settling in the new home, he suffered a hemorrhage of the lungs; he rallied and seemed to be gaining until one week ago the same trouble occurred and one hemorrhage after another followed until death relieved his suffering Monday morning, April 12, 1915.
Mr. Lichlyter was born January 21, 1874, at Madison, IN. Surviving are his wife and two children—William 12, and Blanche 10. Rev. John Acheson conducted a brief service at the late home Monday afternoon and the remains were taken to Madison for burial.
The Lichlyter family came to Illinois four years ago and they have been found loyal neighbors and good workers. Mrs. Lichlyter will return this week and resume the management of the place they had rented. The man that was engaged to help with the work has consented to stay. James L. Lichlyter, father of deceased, and Stevie Lichlyter, a brother, were summoned here shortly before the final summons and Mesdames Craig and Davis of Minonk, two sisters, attended the funeral service.
HR 4/15/1915
Roderick Boget 1915.04.12
Roderick Boget was born at Greece, Monroe County, NY, February 13, 1848. When he was seven years old the family moved to Michigan where he grew to manhood. He came to Illinois in 1868 and had lived in this vicinity about 47 years.
Mr. Boget was married to Emma Avery December 28, 1870. Six children were born to them, five sons and a daughter. The daughter, Alice died in 1880 at the age of seven, but the five sons, Robert, Frank, William, Fred and Delbert are left to mourn, with their mother, their father’s death.
Mr. Boget united with the Presbyterian Church January 30, 1898 and continued to be an earnest and faithful member of it until his death.
On November 29, 1912 he was stricken with paralysis which left him helpless and dependent on the ministrations of his faithful wife. He entered into rest on the afternoon of April 19, 1915.
The funeral services will be held at his late home tomorrow afternoon at 2 o’clock, conducted by Rev. D. M. Ogilvie. The internment will be at Oak Ridge Cemetery.
——————-
Robert Boget died at his home near Sandwich Monday (April 19, 1915) after an illness extending over a period of two years. He suffered two strokes of paralysis, and has been confined to his room and his chair for a long time. He was a patient sufferer, and up to just a short time ago, he daily looked for the great improvement that would allow him to be about among his friends once more.
Mr. and Mrs. Boget formerly lived near Hinckley, and they have a host of warm friends in this locality who deeply mourn his affliction and death. The funeral will be held from the late home tomorrow afternoon, Friday, at two o’clock.
HR 4/22/1915

Ernest Peckman 1915.04.21
The Somonauk Reveille says: Mr. Ernest Peckman died at the Michael Reese Hospital in Chicago at 11 o’clock Wednesday night (April 14, 1915). Mr. Peckman had been traveling in North Dakota and returned to Chicago feeling very poorly about two weeks ago. He was advised by his physician to go to a hospital; but his illness refused to yield to medical treatment and he peacefully entered upon his last sleep Wednesday night.
HR 4/22/1915

Frank Breeding 1915.04.22
The fore part of last week Frank Breeding scratched his hand on some rusty barbed wire. At the same time he was caring for a horse that had been cut. In some ways his hand became infected. It began to pain him but he thought little of it and went to Chicago with stock Thursday evening accompanied by Mr. Watson. In the city Mr. Breeding became very ill and would have been in bad shape had not he had the care that Mr. Watson gave him.
By the time he returned to Waterman Friday evening he was in great pain. Saturday night his condition was alarming. The family was called home and Dr. Wilkinson called a consultation with Dr. Rankin of DeKalb. A trained nurse was called. Monday Mr. Breeding’s condition was still very doubtful and that evening Dr. Rogers of Chicago was called, an operation was performed upon the shoulder in the hopes that it would give some relief.
Mr. Breeding suffered intense pain, and is very ill yet, and is keeping up wonderfully, although but little hope is given for his recovery.
Everyone is anxiously watching his condition and hoping for his recovery. ————-
Mr. Breeding passed away about midnight last night (April 28, 1915). He was unable to overcome the terrible effects of the poison, which had penetrated his entire system. He did not regain consciousness. The funeral will be held from the home Friday afternoon at 2:30 o’clock. HR 4/29/1915
———————
Last week the friends of Mr. Frank Breeding of Waterman were grieved to hear of his death, resulting from blood poisoning which infected a slight scratch on his hand.
The end came Wednesday night, April 28, 1915 at midnight. The funeral services were held at his farm home southeast of Waterman Friday afternoon, the Rev. D. F. Graeser of the Waterman M. E. Church officiating. Songs were sung by a mixed quartet consisting of Ivy Fearon, Sarah MacFarlane, Bryce Ferguson and Mr. Howison, with Myrtis Garner, accompanist.
The pall bearers were five brothers of the deceased—Paul, John, Davis, Harry and Roy and a cousin, Mr. Stringer of Plano. The remains were taken to the Johnson Grove Cemetery for interment, in the beautiful motor hearse from Hinckley, followed by a long line of autos, carrying mourners and friends.
Mr. Breeding’s parents, John and Millicent Breeding, came from the east and settled near Plano where Frank was born April 12, 1865. Here he spent his boyhood, moving to Waterman twenty seven years ago. February 25, 1892 he was united in marriage to Florence Starry, and to them were born seven children, one of whom died in infancy. Those living are Mrs. Ethel Bradbury, Guy, Nellie, Mildred, Weslie and Floyd.
Mr. Breeding’s mother preceded him in death just a few months.
Beside his children, there remain his father, over eighty years old; his wife, his brothers–Paul of Clear Lake, IA, John of Joliet, Lee of Plymouth, IN, Davis and Roy of DeKalb and Harry of Hinckley—and a sister, Nellie Kelsey of Missouri, all of whom were present at his funeral.
Besides those mentioned, Mr. and Mrs. Springer of Plano, Mr. Glenn Bradbury, of Rochelle and Shirley Bradbury of DeKalb were present at the funeral.
Mr. Breeding was a helpful brother, kind and generous neighbor, loving father and a fair, square man in business, and so won a host of friends, who sincerely mourn his loss and sympathize with the bereaved family. He was known far and near and will be greatly missed by all. HR 5/6/1915

Minnie Louise Schumacher 1915.04.23
Minnie Louise, daughter of Elmer and Matilda Schumacher, born January 8, 1912, in Pierce, passed away Tuesday, April 27, 1915, at 6:35 in the evening. She is survived by her parents, one baby sister, her grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. Peter Schumacher, and the Rev. and Mrs. Charles Stockhowe, of Grayville, IL.
Before she was two years old, she entered the primary department of the Sunday school, where she was a faithful and deeply interested, little student of the Bible stories, which seemed to make a deep impression on her child mind. On Easter Sunday she attended for the last time, after which she became a patient little sufferer until Jesus took her into His loving care, where pain and suffering are no more.
Minnie Louise, was an unusually winsome and pleasing little girl; to know her was to love her. She was a little beam of sunshine radiating the home, and will be greatly missed, but in the sunlight of the better world, she still lives. HR 5/6/1915

Cassie S. Lamb Roberts 1915.05.03
A week ago Monday Mrs. Cassie Roberts underwent an operation at the East Side Hospital for cancer. Although in a serious condition she stood the operation fine and seemed to get along well until Saturday evening (May 29, 1915) about six o’clock when she was taken with a stroke of apoplexy and died soon after nine.
The funeral services were held on Wednesday forenoon at 11:00 o’clock at the M. E. Church, Rev. Graeser officiating. The male quartet sang.
Cassie S. Lamb was born near Little Rock May 30, 1849. She was the oldest of five children born to Lenual and Martha Lamb. She came with her parents and located northeast of Waterman when she was but eleven years of age.
She was married to John Deloss Roberts January 7, 1873 and to this union were born Wilder H. Roberts, who now resides in Aurora and Mrs. Grace M. Fay. With her son and daughter she leaves among her immediate relatives a brother, Henry Lamb and a sister Mrs. Louise Scott. Of other relatives she has more than a score and her friends are numbered by the hundred, all who loved and respected her greatly as being a quiet true woman, a staunch and generous friend. She was known and loved by all who knew her and is greatly mourned as a great loss to the church, town and community.
Hundreds of her friends gathered in the church and many followed to the North Clinton Cemetery where interment took place to pay their last respects to a true Christian woman.
Those from out of town who were present are as follows: Mr. and Mrs. E. Tylor and son, Mrs. Emma Lamb, Mrs. Prumnar, Mr. and Mrs. F. Tylor of Plano; Mrs. Ray, Mrs. Brown and Mr. and Mrs. George Denning of Shabbona; Mr. and Mrs. N. Darness of Sycamore; Mrs. Mercer, Mr. and Mrs. Gill Scott and Miss Sadie Scott of Aurora; Alison Gilmore of Chicago; Mrs. Sadie Coullson, Mrs. Lizzie Davis and Mrs. Wells Fay of Hinckley. HR 6/3/1915

James B. Pogue 1915.05.10
James Pogue, cashier of the Hinckley State Bank and lumber man, and treasurer of the DeKalb County Republican Central Committee, died Wednesday morning (May 12, 1915) at 3 o’clock at the Presbyterian Hospital, Chicago, following an operation performed on Tuesday morning in an effort to save his life. He was taken ill about two weeks ago while on a business trip to Montana. He was immediately taken to his home in Hinckley, but became steadily weaker, and Tuesday was taken to Chicago for an operation.
Mr. Pogue has been located in Hinckley for about 30 years, engaged in the banking and lumber business. He was cashier of the Hinckley State Bank; owned a large lumberyard at Hinckley and was interested also in yards at Shabbona and Waterman. He is survived by his wife, Mrs. Anna Shepard Pogue, and two children, Ralph and Mabel. Robert Pogue, a brother, lives at Paw Paw, and his mother and a sister live in California.
The body will be taken to Oswego, his birthplace, for burial and the funeral will probably be held some time Friday.
——————–
Hinckley and community was shocked and stunned when the word came yesterday morning that Cashier James B. Pogue of the Hinckley State Bank had passed away at 3 o’clock at the Presbyterian Hospital in Chicago.
A couple of weeks ago he returned from Montana with his son Ralph. While in the west he was taken with one of the terrible attacks of gall trouble with which he had suffered for a couple of years. The return trip was made under difficulties and he was confined to his bed from the time he arrived home until his demise.
As a last resort to save his life attending physicians and nurses advised removal to the hospital, and he was taken on the fast train early Tuesday morning. A superficial operation was performed to relieve the accumulation of puss, but relief came too late and Mr. Pogue passed away at 3 o’clock the following morning, Wednesday, May 12, 1915.
The remains were brought from Chicago by auto hearse last evening where they are now in state at the Pogue home at the foot of Sycamore Street. The funeral will be held from the Methodist Church Friday afternoon at 1 o’clock, conducted by the Rev. W. W. Diehl, and interment will be made at Oswego, the seat of the Pogue family, where a young son of Mr. and Mrs. Pogue is buried.
Mr. James B. Pogue was without question the greatest figure in financial and business circles of this community during the past twenty five years. For thirty years or more his home has been in Hinckley. As cashier of the State Bank, senior member of the Pogue Brothers’ Lumber Company, with yards at Paw Paw, Waterman and Hinckley, secretary of the Hinckley Grain Company, and directing stockholder and advisor in many other concerns of prominence, he held the unique position of being sought in more cases than any other one man for financial advice. His political affiliations have always been Republican, he being precinct committeeman for Squaw Grove of the county central committee. He was a staunch member and treasurer of the Methodist Church and a member of Hinckley Lodge of Masons.
Mr. Pogue leaves a splendid family—his widow, daughter, Mabel and son Ralph; his mother—one of the pioneers of Kendall County, who now makes her home with the daughter and sister, Mrs. Dr. Livermore, of Chickasha, OK. Mrs. Pogue and Mrs. Livermore arrived in Hinckley on the 10:20 train this morning.
The sympathy of the entire community goes out to the bereaved family. Mr. Pogue’s death, aside from being a severe blow to the loved ones left behind, is a distinct and irreparable loss to the immediate community and this section of Illinois.
Next week we will give a complete historical record of Mr. Pogue’s career. HR 5/13/1915
—————–
The funeral service of the late Mr. James B Pogue, who died at the Presbyterian Hospital in Chicago Wednesday morning, May 12, 1915, was held at the Hinckley Methodist Church Friday afternoon, conducted by his pastor, Rev. W. W. Diehl. It is estimated that over six hundred sorrowing friends and relatives were present to express their sympathy over the passing away of the prominent financier.
Great masses of flowers and exquisite floral pieces banked the chancel of the church, silent tokens of the esteem in which he was held by the bank he founded, by his lodge, and by his host of friends. Mr. Pogue’s business activities had always been on such a tremendous scale and he had been the guiding hand which directed the personal affairs of so many people that his acquaintanceship was limited only by distance, and his loss will be most keenly felt for many years in these circles which did so much to silently expose their sorrow through the voice of the flowers at his last service.
Pastor W. W. Diehl had charge of the service, assisted by the Presbyterian minister of Paw Paw, the local pastor of Mr. Robert Pogue, brother of the deceased. In the choir were Mrs. Maude Dewey, Miss Blanchard, Mr. Wells Fay, and Mr. Arvie Boler, with Miss Aileen Tiede at the piano. The bearers were old friends and business associates of Mr. Pogue—P. F. Slater, A. J. Coster, E. C. McWethy, U. V. Welton and John H. Clark of Hinckley and W. M. McFArlane of Waterman.
Mr. Diehl in his address feelingly spoke of the many characteristics of Mr. Pogue which bound him so closely to his friends; he told of his loyalty to the church and of the great assistance he had been to the church society during the many years he was an active member; he spoke of his broad business ability; his integrity and trustworthiness as a friend, and gave the following statistics of Mr. Pogue’s life:
James B. Pogue was born in Oswego, Kendall County, IL, March 28, 1858. He lived with his parents on the farm until twelve years old when the farm was sold and the family moved to Oswego. James entered the public school in the village and later completed his school life in the business college at Naperville.
In 1884 he married Miss Anna J. Shepard of Oswego. To this union three children were born—Ray S. Pogue, who died in infancy, and Mabel and Ralph Pogue, who are living at home. The immediate surviving members of the family are his widow, Mrs. J. B. Pogue; his children, Mabel and Ralph Pogue; his mother, Mrs. M. J. Pogue, and sister, Mrs. Nettie Livermore, of Chickasha, OK, his brother, Mr. Robert Pogue of Paw Paw, IL.
As a young man Mr. Pogue engaged—with his father in the lumber business in Oswego and later Mr. Robert Pogue became a member of the firm and business was done in the name of The M. J. Pogue & Sons Lumber Company.
In 1884 Mr. Pogue came to Hinckley and purchased the lumber yard of the late Homer Weaver and from Hinckley as a center he enlarged his business activities until he had holdings in the lumber yards at Oswego, Hinckley, Waterman and Paw Paw.
January 1, 1904, he founded the Hinckley State Bank, and through his wise counsel and sane business management this bank has developed into one of the most successful state banks in northern Illinois.
Soon after coming to Hinckley, Brother and Sister Pogue united with the First Methodist Church during the pastorate of Rev. Tibbies. From the first he met and assumed heavy church responsibilities, filling nearly every office in the church open to a layman. His business judgment entered in his constantly expanding life. During the building of the present church edifice and the adjoining commodious parsonage, he served untiringly on the building committee and gave liberally of his time, means and counsel. For many years he was church treasurer, and resigned from this position only when, by reason of ill heath, he was compelled to take a year’s rest from all business activities. During his years of health every church interest received his careful and conscientious consideration. Again and again, during the trying and dark days, out of his own private purse, he met many financial obligations of the church.
In a fine fashion Mr. Pogue projected his Christian life into the business world. Business men, professional men, farmers, and all in need, found in him a trusty counselor and wise helper. Today from regions all around Hinckley men rise up and say: “Mr. Pogue helped me get a start.” He being dead, yet speaketh.
In the passing of Mr. Pogue a wide field of worthy human activity is made vacant. The ceaseless toiler, the conscientious watchman, the constructive builder in business, in church and in family life is silent, and there is no one worthy to bear his armour.
O Love, that will not let me go,
I rest my weary soul in thee;
I give Thee back the life I owe,
That, in thin ocean depths, its flow
May the richer, fuller be.
Following the ceremony at the church, a long line of forty or more automobiles formed for the drive to the Oswego Cemetery, led by the beautiful funeral car of Mr. Nash. At the grave the brief service was said and Mr. Pogue was laid at rest beside the body of his little son, the first child of Mr. and Mrs. Pogue, who was buried in the old home cemetery.
Socially Mr. James B. Pogue was a member of the Hinckley lodge of Masons and the Hamilton Club of Chicago. He petitioned for the degrees in Masonry February 24, 1896; was initiated April 27, passed September 28, and raised October 12 in the same year. One of the peculiar coincidences of his Masonic life is that he was raised to the sublime degree at the same communication in which Brother William Von Ohlen was raised, with whom, eight years later, he was to be so intimately associated in the affairs of the Hinckley State Bank.
Politically, Mr. Pogue has always been Republican, choosing his affiliations in that great political club, the Hamilton Club, whose membership includes many of the most noted men of the United States. For many years he served as precinct committeeman on the county central committee, and at the time of his death was closing a long term as treasurer of that committee.
He was secretary-treasurer of the Hinckley Grain Company, besides the senior member of the Pogue Brothers Lumber Company, which has extensive yards at Paw Paw, with his brother, Robert Pogue, a s resident partner; at Waterman with W. M. McFarlane as resident partner; and at Hinckley with John H. Clark as resident partner.
In many circles his influence and advice will be greatly missed, but his personality will be deeply cherished for many years by those so closely associated with him. HR 5/20/1915
George William Wakefield 1915.05.17
Monday afternoon at 2 o’clock at his late residence, tribute was paid to the memory of George Wakefield by Rev. C. F. Graeser in his funeral sermon. Rev. White assisted with the service and appropriate songs were sung by a mixed quartet consisting of Mesdames Fred Brown and Humphrey Roberts and Messrs. Edgar Hippel and Frank Giles.
Mr. Wakefield had been a Mason so Masons acted as pallbearers and the old soldiers as honorary bearers.
George William Wakefield was born near Rome, Oneida County, NY, August 11, 1837. He was one of nine children, three brothers and one sister surviving him. When about 15 years old the family moved to Maryland. Just preceding the war Mr. Wakefield worked at the carpenter’s trade in Virginia. On account of his Northern sentiments he was compelled to leave and came to Clinton Township where he enlisted in the 105th Illinois Volunteers, seeing three years of service in the army. He was in Sherman’s famous march to the sea. At the close of the war he was honorably discharged as a corporal. Returning home he was married to Mary J. Mighell, eldest daughter of Lewis Mighell, July 12, 1866. To this union two sons and a daughter were born, of which only one survives, George M. Wakefield of Chicago.
Mr. Wakefield had suffered for several years from kidney trouble. The pain became so severe that he submitted to an operation last January for stones in the kidney. Although he apparently made a good recovery from an operation, he was a continuous sufferer and for the last eight weeks gradually declined, until his death shortly after five o’clock Saturday afternoon, May 22, 1915, being 77 years, nine months and the 11 days old. He leaves a widow and son to mourn and respect his memory.
Interment of the remains was made at the North Clinton Cemetery.
Mr. Wakefield has been in the grain business in Waterman for years and is known by hundreds of people. His square upright dealing won him scores of friends in the business world beside the many others who mourn and respect his memory and was demonstrated by the very large attendance at the funeral services.
Those who attended from out of town were: George M. Wakefield, wife and two sons of Chicago; Mrs. Wakefield’s brothers, L. G. and P. S. Mighell of IA; Mary Dearman of Oregon, IL; Mr. and Mrs. Thorpe of Paw Paw and Mrs. Fowler of Paw Paw; also several from Aurora. HR 5/27/1915

Mrs. F. Kroeger 1915.05.20
The many friends of Mrs. F. Kroeger, wife of Rev. F. Kroeger of the Squaw Grove German Lutheran Church, were shocked Friday afternoon (May 14, 1915) when they received the word that she had died suddenly, doubtless from an attack of apoplexy.
For some time Mrs. Kroeger has not been in the best of health and while Mr. Kroeger and the children were in DeKalb, Mrs. Heine, wife of Professor D. Heine, made frequent trips to the nearby parsonage to see that the wife and mother was not in need of anything. Mrs. Heine sent her young son on one trip to ask Mrs. Kroeger if she wished anything and he returned saying to his mother that Mrs. Kroeger was asleep on the floor. Mrs. Heine ran to the home and found the lifeless body of the wife.
The sad death was a great shock to the entire church community and hundreds of friends deeply sympathize with the bereft family. The funeral was held yesterday and interment was made in the cemetery adjoining the church. HR 5/20/1915

George Groves 1915.05.21
The Grove brothers received a cablegram Tuesday from their sister in England saying that they had heard nothing from George, and asking if he sailed on that ship. They had expected him to arrive on that ship, but had heard nothing from him. The Sycamore brothers are sure he has been lost, says the Tribune.
Joseph and Henry Groves, who reside about a mile southwest of Sycamore near Electric Park, believe their brother George Groves, was among the persons who lost their lives when the great ocean liner, Lusitania, was torpedoed by a German submarine.
After visiting his brothers and settling his financial matters, George Groves left Sycamore on Thursday, April 29, and arrived in New York early on Saturday morning with the purpose of taking passage on the Lusitania which sailed that day at 12:20 o’clock. His brothers received a postal card from George dated at New York Saturday morning in which he said he would sail that day. Nothing has since been heard from him. He decided before he left Sycamore to take passage in the steerage, where the least opportunity was afforded to be saved in case of the ship sinking.
He carried with him a draft on London from a Sycamore bank for $9,000. His name has not been reported in either the lists of those saved or rescued. His brothers have given him up for lost.
George Groves was the third in order of birth of seven brothers and one sister, and was the eldest of the three brothers, well known farmers of Sycamore and Mayfield, and the first of the family to come to this country. He first came here from England 42 years ago. He engaged in farming here for many years. He was married to Mrs. Sarah Crmpton, who owned a farm adjoining the Henry Whitmore farm in Mayfield. They bought more land, and accumulated a comfortable fortune. His wife died about 12 years ago, and about a year latter he sold his farm and returned to the home of his early years at Gainsborough, Lincolnshire, England. He visited Sycamore five years ago, and has crossed the Atlantic 14 times.
Mr. Groves was 69 years of age.
Joseph and Henry Groves have written to the steamship company for information, and have watched the newspapers carefully, but have received no encouragement to believe their brother has survived the awful catastrophe. HR 5/20/1915

Viola Weddige 1915.05.22
Friends and relatives in this vicinity were saddened the latter part of the week when a telegram was received from Mr. and Mrs. William Weddige of Briercrest, Saskatchewan, Canada, telling of the death of their daughter, Viola.
Death was caused by appendicitis.
The young lady was eighteen years of age. No particulars have yet been received, and the community extends its sympathy to the bereaved family in the north. HR 5/20/1915
Christian Henry Hartman 1915.05.23
Christian Henry Hartman, head of the well known Squaw Grove family which bears his name, died at his home in Hinckley Friday morning (May 28, 1915) about five o’clock from a general relaxing of the fundamental organs of life, resulting from old age. He was without doubt the wealthiest man in the township, at least before he made the distribution of his property to his children.
At one time he held about nine hundred or a thousand acres of DeKalb County land and sixteen hundred acres of Nebraska land. When his wife and three children came to America, Mr. Hartman’s total wealth amounted to $80 in United States money.
Christian Henry Hartman was born in the town of Wentson, province of Brownswige, German, June 4, 1823. Had he lived a week longer he would have been ninety two years of age. In 1844 he was married to Miss Frederica Walters, and ten years later in 1854, the family came to America. At that time the family consisted of the present Mrs. George Rimsnider, William Hartman and Mrs. John Schmidt, all of whom reside in Hinckley at present. The little family was six weeks on the boat, making the journey, sailing from Bremen. The first stop was made in Sandwich; a year or so was spent in Bristol, and a year or two in Sycamore, and his first purchase of DeKalb County land was the farm of 160 acres northwest of Hinckley, which is still the old Hartman homestead, and where the venerable couple lived continuously for fifty five years, until they moved to Hinckley about three years ago.
Here began Mr. Hartman’s extensive operations in the accumulation of land. The homestead, which today could not be bought for less than three hundred dollars an acre, was purchased for $10 per acre. In a short time, through his industry and frugal living, he had it paid for, and he added 320 acres more at $12.50 per acre. In this way he continued to posses himself of tracks of land in the surrounding country until his holdings were close to a thousand acres, besides a great track of 1,600 acres in Nebraska. The Nebraska land he disposed of several years ago. At the time of his death, he still owned about six hundred acres of land.
To Mr. and Mrs. Hartman ten children were born, two of whom passed away in their infancy, and one, August, died January 16, 1889, leaving a widow and four children. The remaining children are William and Henry Hartman, Mrs. George Rimsnider, Mrs. John Schmidt, Sr., and Mrs. William Wielert of Hinckley; Herman Hartman of Sycamore; Mrs. John Weiss of Aurora.
Mr. Hartman’s greatest public work was his endowment of the Squaw Grove German Lutheran Church, situated about midway, west and east, between Waterman and Hinckley. The church property was donated by Mr. Hartman, adjoining the old homestead on the west. He also donated the plot of the cemetery, and the huge bell in the tower which calls the members to worship. The church is one of the most beautiful and best equipped churches in the county.
The funeral was held from his late home in Hinckley Monday afternoon, conducted by his pastor, Rev. F. Kroeger, and the music was in charge of Mr. Heine. Interment was in the cemetery adjoining the church. Besides the widow and seven children, Mr. Hartman leaves over fifty grandchildren and more than eight great grandchildren. The bearers were all grandsons—Ed Hartman, Ernest Hartman, Louis Hartman, Albert Hartman, Herman Rimsnider, Will Weiss, Charles Wielert and John L. Schmidt, Jr. HR 6/3/1915

Walter Finnie 1915.06.04
No farmer in the vicinity of Sandwich was better known than Mr. Walter Finnie and the news Monday morning that he had taken his own life was startling to his many friends in this city.
The story of the sad event as told to the Yorkville Record is:
Walter Finnie, one of the best known men in the western part of Kendall County shot himself at his home near Millington on Monday morning (June 7, 1915), death coming at once, to relieve his sufferings. Mr. Finnie had been in ill health for the past five or six years, a cancerous growth on the left jaw getting constantly worse, the efforts of the best physician’s being futile in their endeavors to check the trouble. Finally, recalling the sufferings of his father, who had been similarly afflicted, Mr. Finnie made up his mind that he would not live to endure a like fate.
Millington was in mourning Monday after the news of this sudden death was brought to the village and the Millington State Bank, of which Mr. Finnie was vice president, closed its doors. On every side were heard words of sympathy and messages of condolence were heard from the surrounding country for the grief stricken family. As a boy Walter Finnie was known in that village, and as a man he grew to be one of the mainstays of the community, staunch in friendship, willing with his assistance, and prominent as a businessman. He was a man of this sturdy Scotch extraction and his ability has done much for the making of Millington as a town were trade is carried on.
About six years ago Mr. Finnie became afflicted with a cancerous growth which affected the left side of his face. Several operations had each seemed successful at the time but the trouble always returned and the man suffered almost constantly. A few weeks ago he went to Milwaukee where he underwent what is known as the “radium treatment” and for a time seemed to be in his former health and spirits. Gradually, however, the pain and trouble returned. A consultation with leading doctors led to a belief that a return to the radium treatment would be beneficial and plans were made for Mr. Finnie to go back to Milwaukee Monday morning.
Saturday, Tom Finnie, the son, came from Hinckley, where he is an assistant cashier of the State Bank, to visit his father and the family and was reunited for the weekend. When it came time for him return to his business the father asked that he stay overnight to see how things came out. It is thought that Mr. Finnie was a little apprehensive as to the operation he was to undergo and wanted the family with him. until he left for Milwaukee. Miss Ruth Finnie heard her father up and about downstairs during Sunday night and was aroused by the shot that ended the life of the father and friend.
Mr. Finnie had carefully planned his deed. Letters were written to his sisters and children, and Charles Pluess, his brother-in-law and former business partner, was given explicit instructions as to the disposition of his estate. He had gone out to the lawn swing where he had taken much comfort and had ended his six years of suffering with a revolver shot at about 5:00 in the morning (June 7, 1915).
In the absence of a coroner in the County, Justice of the Peace C. E. Sleezer was called to investigate the death. The jurors were F. H. Lord, Ben Rasmussen, Joseph Nelson, Henry Axland, Albert Johnson and Torkel Newtson, who found a verdict in keeping with the circumstances.
Living in Millington all his life, Mr. Finnie was one of the best known men of the community. He was born on the Finnie Homestead in Fox Township August 2, 1851, the son of Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Finnie. The father was born in Scotland and came to the United States when twelve years of age. He brought the Scotch thrift with him and when he started farming in Kendall County he began to accumulate property. Walter Finnie’s mother was at Mary Aldrich, who died in 1900, following her husband, who died in 1897. The children of the family were Mrs. Mary L. Ballou, Mrs. Irene Scoggin, Mrs. Addie Pluess, all of Millington.
Walter Finnie was educated in the district school, the Fowler Institute of Newark, and later in the Illinois State Normal School when he came home to take the management of the farm owned by his father. This property covered several hundreds of acres and kept the young man busy. His care of stock and grain enriched the coffers and he soon branched out into the mercantile business. In 1888 he was married to Emma D. Miller of Ottawa and the two children, Tom and Ruth, mourned her death with their father in 1892. There has been no real business venture in Millington for years in which Walter Finnie was not consulted, and the bank that he and his brother-in-law Charles Pluess, operated was recently changed into a state organization. Mr. Finnie was made director and vice president. He also was a stockholder in the Farmers Trust and Savings Bank of Sandwich.
The funeral was held from the late home this afternoon at 1:30, with the services Wednesday at 1:30 p.m. at the cemetery.
———————-
Word was received in Hinckley early Monday morning (June 7, 1915) that Mr. Walter Finnie, father of Assistant Cashier Thomas Finnie of the Hinckley State bank, had shot himself at this home in Millington during the night. The son is at home with his sister Ruth, and Miss Marvel McAllister has been assisting in the bank during his absence. Mr. Walter Finnie was one of the best known men in the Millington and Newark territory. He was extensively interested in the Millington Bank, grain company, and farming interests of that part of LaSalle and Kendall Counties, and had a wide circle of acquaintances in the business and professional worlds. For several years he has been suffering with a cancer, and at times when the pain became too intense, he would spend the hours of the night walking about the lawn of his country home. He was found early Monday morning in the lawn swing, and a revolver with one chamber exploded told the tragic story.
The late Mr. Finnie leaves two children, Thomas M. Finnie of Hinckley, and one daughter, Miss Ruth of Millington, and the deepest sympathy of the community is extended to the bereaved ones. The funeral was held yesterday and interment made in the beautiful Millington-Newark Cemetery. HR 6/10/1915

Lydia C. Roberts French 1915.06.06
Everyone was shocked and grieved Tuesday morning (June 14, 1915) to learn of the death of Mrs. Lark French, who died about 3 o’clock that morning. Mrs. French (nee Lydia Roberts) was ill at the hospital in Waterman for some time, suffering with a goiter. She had been home a few days and Friday afternoon she was taken worse, her heart rapidly failing.
The funeral services were held in the Presbyterian Church, Thursday forenoon at 11 o’clock, Rev. White officiating.
Mrs. French is well known in Waterman, having spent her life in the neighborhood. She was still a young woman and in her immediate family leaves her husband and two small children. Obituary will be published next week. HR 6/17/1915
——————-
Thursday, June 16, 1915, at 11 o’clock occurred the funeral of Mrs. Lydia French, in the Waterman Presbyterian Church, Rev. White officiating. The Misses McFarlane and Ivy Fearon sang. The church was crowded with the many friends of the French family.
Lydia C. Roberts was born one mile southwest of Waterman April 13, 1880. November 26, 1903, she was united in marriage to Levi Lark French. To this union were born three children—Grace Julia, James W. and Edna Margaret.
Several months ago Mrs. French was taken ill with a goiter, with which she was a constant but patient sufferer until the end came at two o’clock Tuesday morning, her age being 34 years, 2 months and 2 days.
To mourn her loss are her two children, James, and Edna, Grace having died when very small; her husband; her mother, Mrs. Julia Roberts; one sister, Mrs. Eva Esperson; and two brothers, John and Bruce, all of whom reside at Waterman, except John of DeKalb.
Mrs. French was a lover of the home, a faithful, diligent and indulgent companion and mother. Many will greatly miss her, but who can miss her more than her husband and children?
Among those from out of town at the funeral were Mr. and Mrs. Wilder Roberts and Mr. and Mrs. Congdon of Aurora; Mr. French’s father, mother, sister Hazel and brother Ray of Greenville, OH, and Mr. and Mrs. Williams from near Wedron.
HR 6/24/1915

Catherine Bridge Noss 1915.06.11
Everyone was much shocked and grieved Monday morning as the news flashed about telling of the death of Mrs. Kate Noss. She had seemed to be improving rapidly the past few days. Mrs. Noss was one of the family of nine children, two sisters preceding her in death.
At the age of 27 she was united in marriage to William Noss of Dun Cannon, PA. This union was born one son, Harry William. Soon after their marriage they moved to this county, Mrs. Noss having since made these parts her home, her husband preceding her in death 18 years ago.
Mrs. Noss was a hard working woman, a good wife and a Christian mother. By her plain, kindly character and unflagging industry she won for herself a high place in the esteem of Waterman people, all who grieve her loss to earth.
Four weeks ago an operation for a cancer was found necessary. She was taken to the Francis Willard hospital where she received the best of care. After a trying time for a week she began to gain and had been gaining rapidly ever since until death unexpectedly called her home Monday morning.
The deceased leaves to mourn her death one son, Harry W. Noss of Waterman, four brothers, Adam and Henry Bridge of Waterman, Wynn Bridge of Bristol, and Chris Bridge of Bloomfield, PA; also three sisters, Mrs. Anna Wann of Storm Lake, IA; Mrs. Ella Wann of Halifax, PA, and Mrs. Susan Shatte of Harrisburg, PA.
The funeral services were held and the Presbyterian Church Wednesday afternoon at 1 o’clock, Rev. W. M. White officiating. Interment was at Oak Mound Cemetery.
Those from out of town who attended the services were Winn Bridge of Bristol and Mr. and Mrs. Shock of Sycamore.
——————
Mrs. Catherine Noss (nee Bridge) was born January 9, 1862, in New Bloomfield, Perry County, PA, and died June 28, 1915, age 53 years, 5 months and 19 days. Mrs. Noss was one of a family of nine children—two sisters preceding her in death.
At the age of 27 she was united in marriage to William Noss of Duncannon, PA, and to this union was born one son, Harry William. Soon after their marriage they moved to his county, Mrs. Noss having since made these parts her home, her husband preceding her in death 18 years ago. Mrs. Noss was a hard working woman, a good wife and a Christian mother. By her kindly character and unflagging industry she won for herself a high place in the esteem of Waterman people.
Four weeks ago an operation for cancer was found necessary. She was taken to the Frances Willard Hospital where she received the best of care. After a trying time for a week she began to gain and had been gaining rapidly until death unexpectedly called her. Deceased leaves her one son Harry W. Noss of Waterman, four brothers—Adam and Henry Bridge of Waterman, Winn Bridge of Bristol and Christ Bridge of New Bloomfield, PA; also three sisters—Mrs. Anna Wann of Storm Lake, IA, Mrs. Ella Wann of Halifax, PA, and Mrs. Susan Shatto of Harrisburg, PA.
The funeral services were held in the Presbyterian Church Wednesday afternoon, Rev. W. M. White officiating. Interment was at Oak Mound Cemetery. HR 7/1/1915

Nathan Edgar Comp 1915.06.12
Nathan Edgar Comp was born at New Bloomfield, PA, October 4, 1870. He was united in marriage to Emma Jane Carnes at Dun Cannon, PA, on November 1, 1892. To that union were born two children, Andrew Bertus and Emma Jane.
Mr. Comp came to Illinois in 1900 and resided in Waterman nine years. He then went to Aurora, SD, where he resided until his spirit took its flight last Friday, June 25, 1915 at 6:45 PM.
Mr. Comp had accepted Christ as his savior and united with the Presbyterian Church at Dun Cannon, PA, when about 20 years of age. He ever did that which so commendable in anyone, to wit, in changing his place of residence he never forgot his Church letter. He united with the Waterman Presbyterian Church by letter July 7, 1901, and was given a letter June 29, 1913 to the Presbyterian Church at White City, SD.
He was a member of the Waterman Lodge of the Modern Woodman of America.
To mourn his loss to earth are his bereaved wife and two little children, his sister, Mrs. Joseph Adams of New Bloomfield, PA; his three brothers, John W. of Harrisburg, PA; William Frank, of Waterman, and Whitle Robert of New Bloomfield, PA; also two brothers-in-law, Harvey Carnes of Aurora, SD, who accompanied Mrs. Comp on her sad trip here with her husband’s remains, and Oliver Carnes of Waterman. Together with these are many kindred and friends who deeply mourn and sympathize with the bereaved.
The funeral services were held in the Waterman Presbyterian Church Tuesday forenoon at 10: 30 o’clock, Rev. W. M. White officiating. Interment was made in the Johnson Grove Cemetery. HR 7/1/1915

Leon Chappell 1915.06.18
Just as we were going to press, the sad news was received of the sudden death of Mr. Leon Chappell, brother of R. D. Chappell of Hinckley. Deceased had been ailing slightly during the past year or so, presumably the after effects of a fall received at Maywood, IL, several years ago, where he was erecting a row of dwellings in the new addition. He had just begun taking treatment with specialist at Joliet, and was in Aurora the day before his death superintending the erection of dwellings he was putting up in that city. His sudden death was a severe blow to his relatives and friends.
Deceased was a contractor and builder, following in the footsteps of his father and grandsires, carrying the trade of the family through four successive generations. He was still in the prime of life, and leaves, besides his wife and children–all young people in the Plano schools, his father and mother, Mr. and Mrs. Henry Chappell, and sister, Mrs. Fred G. Gates of Yorkville, and the brother in Hinckley.
Funeral services have not been announced, but will probably be held Friday. HR 6/17/1915

John Metz 1915.06.19
Mr. John Metz died at his home in the old town last Friday (June 11, 1915) at a really advanced age, his demise being brought on by heart trouble.
For many years Mr. Metz was a prominent character in this vicinity. He was a blacksmith of the old school, a man who knew metals well, and an expert mechanic. As his years wore on he was gradually compelled to give up his labors at the shop. His widow survives him.
The funeral was held from the Methodist Church Sunday afternoon, Rev. W. W. Diehl officiating HR 6/17/1915

Alice Loretta Oleson 1915.06.20
Little Alice Loretta Oleson died at the home of her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Peter Oleson, south of Hinckley, after five days of intense suffering with pneumonia, June 17, 1915 at 9:30 p.m., aged two months and ten days. She leaves to mourn her loss, besides her parents, 3 sisters and 3 brothers. The funeral was held Sunday at the home at 12 o’clock, conducted by Rev. Mernitz of St. Paul’s Church. Interment was at Greenwood Cemetery. HR 6/24/1915

Frederica Walters Hartman 1915.07.07
Mr. and Mrs. Henry Hartman and Mr. and Mrs. Elmer Riemensnider went to Hinckley yesterday to attend the funeral services of their grandmother, Mrs. Christian Hartman.
Mrs. Christian H. Hartman died at her home in Hinckley on Monday morning (July 19, 1915), only a few weeks after the death of her husband, who died on May 20, 1915 at the great age of 92 years, and who was reputed to be the wealthiest citizen of Squaw Grove Township.
Mrs. Hartman’s maiden name was Frederica Walters, and she was a native of Wentson, Brownswige Province, Germany, where she grew to womanhood and where she was united in marriage to Christian H. Hartman in 1844. Ten years later, in 1854 they emigrated to America, the children at that time being the present Mrs. George Riemensnider, William Hartman and Mrs. John Schmidt, all of whom are residents of Hinckley. They were six weeks on the journey from Bremen to New York. They stopped for a short time in Sandwich, resided for a year or two in Bristol, Kendall County, and after a year or two at Sycamore, and then purchased a farm of 160 acres northwest of Hinckley which is still the old Hartman Homestead and where the family resided for 35 years.
Mrs. Hartman became the mother of ten children, two of whom died in infancy, and one son, August, died on January 16, 1889, leaving a widow and four children. The remaining children of Mrs. Hartman are: William and Henry Hartman, Mrs. George Riemensnider, Mrs. John Schmidt, Sr., and Mrs. William Wielert, all of Hinckley; Herman Hartman of Sycamore and Mrs. John Weiss of Aurora. She also leaves surviving more than 50 grandchildren and more than eighty great grandchildren.
The funeral services were held on Wednesday afternoon at the Squaw Grove German Lutheran Church between Watermen and Hinckley and adjoining the old homestead on the west, which was endowed by Mr. and Mrs. Hartman. The service was conducted by the pastor, Rev. F. Kroeger. The remains were interred beside the remains of her husband in the cemetery adjoining the church. HR 7/22/1915

Isabella Kirkpatrick Harter 1915.07.08
Friday afternoon at 1:30 o’clock in the Presbyterian Church occurred the funeral services of the late Mrs. John Harter. Rev. Nixon of Minneapolis took charge of the services assisted by Rev. White.
Isabella Kirkpatrick was born on March 27, 1833 in Perry County, PA. She was married January 1, 1855 to John W. Harter. The following year they moved west, settling near Waterman. To them were born eight children, 6 sons and two daughters. The sons are Richard, who lives in Plano; Harry, who died in Chicago; Cyrus, living in Texas; Walter of Chicago; John, whose whereabouts are unknown, and Charles of Chicago. The daughters are Jennie of Chicago and Alice White of Minneapolis.
Twenty five years ago while driving a milk wagon Mr. Harter was killed on the main crossing of the Burlington tracks here.
A few years later Mrs. Harter moved to Sandwich where she lived several years before going to Chicago where she died July 14, 1915 at the home of her son, Walter.
Mrs. Harter had been ill since the first of April, suffering intense pain.
Mr. and Mrs. Harter were both members of the Presbyterian Church here and very willing, loyal workers. During her recent illness Mrs. Harter often spoke of the class of boys she taught in the Sunday school at Waterman.
Beside her sons and daughters she leaves to mourn her death, ten grandchildren and two sisters.
Those from out of town who attended the funeral were all the children excepting Cyrus and John; her sister, Mrs. Robert Walker and husband, of Aurora, her sister, Mrs. Jennie Howison of Sandwich, a nephew, Charles Howison of Sandwich, Mr. and Mrs. Pinney and Mr. McGuire of Chicago, Leon Harter, a grandson of Detroit, Mrs. Alice White and two daughters, Mrs. Denning and Miss Josephine White of Chicago, and Mr. and Mrs. Preston of Paw Paw. They were all entertained at the home of Mrs. Howison in Waterman, a sister of Mrs. Harter.
HR 7/22/1915

Calvin Plapp 1915.07.15
Calvin Plapp, son of David Plapp and one of the Plapp brothers, so well known about DeKalb County, was drowned Monday (July 12, 1915) while in bathing in the river at Dixon. He was a young man, being only 20 years of age and he was well known to a large host of acquaintances in this part of the country.
———————-
People of this community were shocked Tuesday when they heard of the death of Calvin Plapp, well known young farmer, who was to have been married soon to Miss Ziegler, one of the party of young folks who were in the company at the time the tragedy happened.
Mr. Plapp was a brother of A. J. Plapp, former implement dealer at Hinckley, and was working for him on the farm in Pierce Township. In telling of the sad happening The DeKalb Chronicle says:
Calvin Plapp, the son of David Plapp and one of the Plapp brothers, so well known about DeKalb County, was drowned Monday (July 4, 1915) while bathing in the river at Dixon. He was a young man, being only twenty years of age and he was well known to a large host of acquaintances about this part of the country
He, in company with Misses Vela Krieger and Bertha Ziegler and Ray Brown prepared to go in bathing and there was a race between the young fellows to see who could get into the water first. The young ladies had gotten into their bathing suits and had gone into the water and were wading around in shallow water, and when the young man came down to the water he supposed the water to be shallow all around the spot and he deliberately jumped in.
Instead of being shallow, there was a hole fifteen feet deep at the place where he went in. He was not much of a swimmer and he began struggling at once. He came up only to go down, and again he came up and this time he called for help but before help could reach him, he was gone forever.
An expert swimmer who was near went in after him but was unable to locate him and it was not until 55 minutes later that his body was found about fifty feet down stream from where he had last disappeared. Everything was done to try to revive him, but he was dead.
The young man was attending a Sunday school picnic which was being held in Dixon as one of the many private picnics which were held Monday in conjunction with the big celebration held by the citizens of Dixon. He had taken part in some foot races a short time prior to his going in bathing and it may be that because of his overheated condition he became cramped upon going into the cold water and thus was unable to help himself.
He has been working for some time with his brother, Aaron on the Austin farm down in Pierce Township, and before Aaron took this farm he had worked in that part of the township for several years where he always has been well liked by all who knew him. His many friends are grieved greatly over this sad sudden death.
Calvin was the youngest of a family of fourteen children, most of whom are living in DeKalb County. One brother lives in Canada.
J. A. Nash, undertaker of Hinckley came to DeKalb Tuesday morning in his auto hearse to get the body which came to DeKalb on the noon train from Dixon. From here he took the body to Aaron Plapp’s place. The funeral was held at 12:30 this noon at the East Pierce Church with interment in the cemetery adjoining the church lot.
Calvin’s unfortunate death is the first break to come in the family circle. HR 7/8/1915

John F. Steward 1915.07.17
John F. Steward, who assisted in the development of the Marsh harvester, one of the pioneers in the harvester machinery business, and for a half century identified with the greatest firms manufacturing reapers, died Sunday evening (July 4, 1915) at his home in Plano, aged 74 years. He had been ill for many weeks. Until Mr. Steward retired recently, he was employed by the William Deering and International Harvester Companies at a great salary as an authority on harvesting machinery. He held many patents on reapers. He leaves a widow and their children, Charles A. Steward of Fox, and Mrs. Winifred Steward Davis of Hollywood, CA. Mr. Steward was born in Plano in a log house beside a wheat field, June 23, 1841, about the time the old original Steward saw mill was built. He served in the Civil War. After his return, he did contract work for the Marsh harvester concerns and then was re-engaged by William Deering as an inventor. For the last three years he has received a large salary as the head of the patent department. HR 7/8/1915

James Ploger 1915.07.18
Hinckley people were shocked last night (July 14, 1915) to hear of the death of James Ploger of Aurora, who shot himself in the head with a small revolver in one of the upper rooms of his garage at his home on Fourth Street.
Many years ago “Jimmy” Ploger lived in Hinckley, where he married his first wife, Miss Hefner. After he moved to Aurora he worked for Frank Button a long time in the buffet, then started in business for himself, his last location being at the corner of Fox and LaSalle Streets. He was a popular fellow with all his friends, and he was well liked by everybody in Hinckley.
About two years after the death of his first wife, he was married again and his present wife has been a splendid mother to the three fine boys, who with her, remain to mourn his death.
No cause is found for the tragedy in the Ploger home. The family circle was one of the happiest in Aurora; Mr. Ploger had a great business and was making lots of money, and the report that he worried over the city going dry next spring is flouted by those who know him. There must have been a sudden stroke of temporary insanity, as no other cause is available. He drove from his saloon direct to his home, left his car outside the front yard, walked to the barn, barred the door and took his life without a word to anyone of his intentions, no did he leave any letter to explain his act. HR 7/15/1915

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *